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photgraphing pottery


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#1 Patti Moss

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Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:20 PM

Patti:rolleyes:src="http://ceramicartsda.../rolleyes.gif">
Patti Moss

#2 bigDave

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 08:43 PM

keep hoping for something interesting here




#3 Chantay

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 05:04 AM

I did a search on Bing and found this, looks helpful. -chantay



http://www.sanjoaqui...raphing_Art.pdf


- chantay

#4 voceramics

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 06:33 AM

I usually photograph in front of a north facing window after noon so that the light is warmer and less blue, using a $10 vinyl remnant draped from the ceiling down onto a table as a background which helps to capture as much natural indirect light as possible. White poster board works well too.

It helps to use the macro (flower) setting on the camera. I also increase the white balance a couple of clicks because I prefer crisper colors without the moody glow.
Phuong
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#5 bigDave

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:14 PM

Vo,

Your pics look good, thanks for the tips

:Dsrc="http://ceramicartsda...t/biggrin.gif">

#6 Mark C.

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:26 PM

I use a graduated background white to dark grey in a large photo cube (use google to find one like at B& H camera)
The look is like this.
Mark

Attached Files


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#7 neilestrick

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:32 PM

I have a home-made light box that hangs from the ceiling, with nine 100 watt equivalent CFL bulbs. I used to use photo floods, but they got expensive and run really hot. Plus with digital cameras color correction is super simple. The bottom of the box has diffusion plastic, so the light is very soft. My backdrop is a 4 foot wide piece of medium gray photo backdrop paper that hangs down onto the table. This provides a great fade to black that can be adjusted depending on the size of the pot. I'll try to get a photo of the setup this weekend.

Attached File  Carved-Platter-Matte.jpg   249.99KB   90 downloads

Neil Estrick
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#8 bigDave

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 10:55 PM

I use a graduated background white to dark grey in a large photo cube (use google to find one like at B& H camera)
The look is like this.
Mark

Your photo really pops, no shadow and colors are amazing
Explain more about photo cube, google is not helping

#9 JLowes

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 06:35 AM

Dave,

Google ezcube for a good start. There are many other brands, but these are good.

John

#10 Mark C.

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:11 PM

Big Dave I bought my setup here-lights and cube-got the graduated background elsewhere
http://store.tabletopstudio-store.com/
This guy above is in Carpenteria in so-cal and is a photographer

You can get these cubes at many places-this place has the lights-I bought a larger cube but shows are my livelihood so great photos are most important
B and H camera(new york mail order house) has the cubes and sells the lights as well.
Here are few more shots with this setup.
I grew the bamboo for the handles
Mark

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Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#11 bigDave

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

Big Dave I bought my setup here-lights and cube-got the graduated background elsewhere
http://store.tabletopstudio-store.com/


cool thanks

#12 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:48 AM

I use two blue bulbs, an ez cube and a varitone backdrop.

For larger pieces I used the North side of the house in the shade with a roll of thunder gray backdrop paper.

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#13 Mark C.

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 07:19 PM

I use two blue bulbs, an ez cube and a varitone backdrop.

For larger pieces I used the North side of the house in the shade with a roll of thunder gray backdrop paper.

Marcia,
My backdrop also is a veritone
What"s a blue bulb exactly?
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#14 bigDave

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:14 PM

yOU GUYS ARE GOING TO LAUGH, BUT I HAVE BEEN EXPERIMENTING WITH MIRRORS, CUSTOMERS THINK IS IS COOL

opps sorry caps. just had surgery and still on percoset...frikin hernia....lift with your legs friends ---oh wait that wouldnt help, make your friends lift for you.... yeah thats it

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#15 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 07:00 AM


I use two blue bulbs, an ez cube and a varitone backdrop.

For larger pieces I used the North side of the house in the shade with a roll of thunder gray backdrop paper.

Marcia,
My backdrop also is a veritone
What"s a blue bulb exactly?
Mark


Day light photo bulbs are blue in color.
Marcia

#16 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 07:22 AM

To be exact: blue bulbs are photo lights "BCA". I have both 115 W @ 120V and 250 W @ 118V.
My photo shop in Montana just referred to them as Blue Bulbs for Daylight bulbs.

Marcia

#17 justanassembler

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:03 PM

I've been using a couple of these for larger work, and hanging a single overhead for smaller stuff. They are cheap and work well, they use a high output 5500k CFL bulb that is rated for ~10,000 hours and doesn't heat up like old tungsten. They're easy to white balance for and with either a veritone or seamless grey backdrop, easy to shoot good images with... With the increased availability of photo lights and the decrease in their cost, there is almost no reason not to have a modest photo setup. If you're serious about documenting, applying to shows, schools, or for publication, there is no other way to go.

#18 Natania

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 07:27 PM

Attached is a pic of my set up - I made a "light box" -type thing from foam core and white "fabric" shower curtain liner (and lots of white duct tape). The photos I take of my work look good, but the one I took of the set up is a little dark because of being back-lit from the windows (I was in a hurry). The cost of the whole thing was only for the photo floods, long-armed lamps and of course the camera...

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#19 Mark C.

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:08 PM

I've been using a couple of these for larger work, and hanging a single overhead for smaller stuff. They are cheap and work well, they use a high output 5500k CFL bulb that is rated for ~10,000 hours and doesn't heat up like old tungsten. They're easy to white balance for and with either a veritone or seamless grey backdrop, easy to shoot good images with... With the increased availability of photo lights and the decrease in their cost, there is almost no reason not to have a modest photo setup. If you're serious about documenting, applying to shows, schools, or for publication, there is no other way to go.


I use three of these lights and a photo easy cube and a varitone graduated backgound-these are the lights to get.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#20 Lucille Oka

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 10:32 PM

yOU GUYS ARE GOING TO LAUGH, BUT I HAVE BEEN EXPERIMENTING WITH MIRRORS, CUSTOMERS THINK IS IS COOL

opps sorry caps. just had surgery and still on percoset...frikin hernia....lift with your legs friends ---oh wait that wouldnt help, make your friends lift for you.... yeah thats it



That is a cool effect.
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"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".




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