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bobostski

softening hard in the jar comercal glaze

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The ceramics shop gave me some glazes (cone 6) that had become hard in the jars. They didn't dry out but had become very stiff. I added water and used a blender to soften them up. I ended up with a jar and a half of glaze when done. Now here is the problem, with so much water in the glaze, it shrinks, crackes and falls off the pot. The glaze is now the consistancy of pudding and not runny. Anybody know of a way to make these glazes usefull. I teach in a high school and have 120 ceramics students. I have about 50 jars of glazes in this condition and would be great if I could make them usefull.

Thanks

Bob

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The ceramics shop gave me some glazes (cone 6) that had become hard in the jars. They didn't dry out but had become very stiff. I added water and used a blender to soften them up. I ended up with a jar and a half of glaze when done. Now here is the problem, with so much water in the glaze, it shrinks, crackes and falls off the pot. The glaze is now the consistancy of pudding and not runny. Anybody know of a way to make these glazes usefull. I teach in a high school and have 120 ceramics students. I have about 50 jars of glazes in this condition and would be great if I could make them usefull.

Thanks

Bob

 

 

 

 

 

 

spectrum sells a product called glaze thinner. if you call and talk to the technical guy, he will tell you what it is. it does work but you will need to find a place that sells it. i got mine from bailey.

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The ceramics shop gave me some glazes (cone 6) that had become hard in the jars. They didn't dry out but had become very stiff. I added water and used a blender to soften them up. I ended up with a jar and a half of glaze when done. Now here is the problem, with so much water in the glaze, it shrinks, crackes and falls off the pot. The glaze is now the consistancy of pudding and not runny. Anybody know of a way to make these glazes usefull. I teach in a high school and have 120 ceramics students. I have about 50 jars of glazes in this condition and would be great if I could make them usefull.

Thanks

Bob

 

 

Thanks, I'll give them a call. Most of the glazes are Amaco so I think I will call them first.

 

 

 

spectrum sells a product called glaze thinner. if you call and talk to the technical guy, he will tell you what it is. it does work but you will need to find a place that sells it. i got mine from bailey.

 

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The ceramics shop gave me some glazes (cone 6) that had become hard in the jars. They didn't dry out but had become very stiff. I added water and used a blender to soften them up. I ended up with a jar and a half of glaze when done. Now here is the problem, with so much water in the glaze, it shrinks, crackes and falls off the pot. The glaze is now the consistancy of pudding and not runny. Anybody know of a way to make these glazes usefull. I teach in a high school and have 120 ceramics students. I have about 50 jars of glazes in this condition and would be great if I could make them usefull.

Thanks

Bob

 

 

It sounds like you initially added too much water (ended up with a jar and a half . . . shrinks, cracks and falls off the pot). But it sounds like some of the water has since evaporated (glaze is now the consistency of pudding and not runny). To rehydrate, add a little water at a time and mix with blender . . . but the amount of water and glaze should not be more than can fit in the original jar. If it is still too thick, add a drop of Darvan . . . that will make it flow easier but not make it more watery. And, only a drop . . . a little goes a long way.

 

Check out the Linda Arbuckle video clip for how to mix glazes and get viscosity correct . . . http://ceramicartsdaily.org/ceramic-supplies/ceramic-glaze/video-of-the-week-how-to-flocculate-a-ceramic-glaze-for-better-coverage/

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The ceramics shop gave me some glazes (cone 6) that had become hard in the jars. They didn't dry out but had become very stiff. I added water and used a blender to soften them up. I ended up with a jar and a half of glaze when done. Now here is the problem, with so much water in the glaze, it shrinks, crackes and falls off the pot. The glaze is now the consistancy of pudding and not runny. Anybody know of a way to make these glazes usefull. I teach in a high school and have 120 ceramics students. I have about 50 jars of glazes in this condition and would be great if I could make them usefull.

Thanks

Bob

 

 

It sounds like you initially added too much water (ended up with a jar and a half . . . shrinks, cracks and falls off the pot). But it sounds like some of the water has since evaporated (glaze is now the consistency of pudding and not runny). To rehydrate, add a little water at a time and mix with blender . . . but the amount of water and glaze should not be more than can fit in the original jar. If it is still too thick, add a drop of Darvan . . . that will make it flow easier but not make it more watery. And, only a drop . . . a little goes a long way.

 

Check out the Linda Arbuckle video clip for how to mix glazes and get viscosity correct . . . http://ceramicartsda...etter-coverage/

 

The video was good but that is not the problem. When the glaze dryes, it shrinks ,crackes and falls off the pots. The glaze in the jars had to be scraped out with a screw driver. the glaze was still wet but more like real thick slip. I used a top loading blender to mix the glaze. When I was finished some of the glazes were tlhick like pudding but were very wet and did not need more water. I thought maybe the blender has added to much air. The glaze was like a thick milk shake. I called Amaco but the teck was not in so I will let you know what he had to say.

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Do not add anything yet.

If the glaze is still wet and thick add small amounts of water and stir slowly at first, then vigorously with a paint stirrer, then shake until you get to the consistency you want. For hard glazes you add small amounts of warm water just upto the glaze line set it aside and allow the water to soak into the glaze. Later or the next day you will be able to stir, shake and even add a little more water if needed.

 

Call or email Lori Jenkins at Amaco. Explain to Lori your problem I am sure she will help you.

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