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wildfire

Using wads in an electric kiln?

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I'm a beginning potter without much experience in glazing and glaze firing. I'm using a ^4-6 clay and ^6 glazes. I'm in the process of making flat Christmas ornaments and am wondering how to keep the glaze from dripping onto the kiln shelves. Tried stilts -- discovered that won't work when firing ^6. Have heard of wadding -- will that work in an electric kiln? What would happen if I formed wads made from the same clay as my pots (without adding the other wadding ingredients), bisque fired (or not?) and just sat the pots on those? Is there some other method I should use?

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I'm a beginning potter without much experience in glazing and glaze firing. I'm using a ^4-6 clay and ^6 glazes. I'm in the process of making flat Christmas ornaments and am wondering how to keep the glaze from dripping onto the kiln shelves. Tried stilts -- discovered that won't work when firing ^6. Have heard of wadding -- will that work in an electric kiln? What would happen if I formed wads made from the same clay as my pots (without adding the other wadding ingredients), bisque fired (or not?) and just sat the pots on those? Is there some other method I should use?

 

 

 

Wading will work, I have not tried using just clay, suppose if you bisque the clay then set the glazed pot on if might work, experiment first…Wading is my first and only choice.

 

Edie.

 

 

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I suggest you add some alumina to the clay-just wedge it in. You would not need much. You could also use silica if you had no alumina.Alumina will resist glaze somewhat better I feel.

Our salt wadding is epk and alumina it does not stick .

Mark

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I suggest you add some alumina to the clay-just wedge it in. You would not need much. You could also use silica if you had no alumina.Alumina will resist glaze somewhat better I feel.

Our salt wadding is epk and alumina it does not stick .

Mark

 

 

Thanks, Mark. Do I bisque fire before use or just stick them on? I've also read about attaching wads w/ hot glue or Elmer's school glue - really?

 

 

 

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I'm a beginning potter without much experience in glazing and glaze firing. I'm using a ^4-6 clay and ^6 glazes. I'm in the process of making flat Christmas ornaments and am wondering how to keep the glaze from dripping onto the kiln shelves. Tried stilts -- discovered that won't work when firing ^6. Have heard of wadding -- will that work in an electric kiln? What would happen if I formed wads made from the same clay as my pots (without adding the other wadding ingredients), bisque fired (or not?) and just sat the pots on those? Is there some other method I should use?

 

 

 

Wading will work, I have not tried using just clay, suppose if you bisque the clay then set the glazed pot on if might work, experiment first…Wading is my first and only choice.

 

Edie.

 

 

 

Thanks, Edie!

 

 

 

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No they do not need bisquing first just make them small say 1/4 inch and fire a tad slow at 1st. Roll them in palm of hand into small balls. When putting pot on shelve push a bit down to level it.

Mark

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I'm a beginning potter without much experience in glazing and glaze firing. I'm using a ^4-6 clay and ^6 glazes. I'm in the process of making flat Christmas ornaments and am wondering how to keep the glaze from dripping onto the kiln shelves. Tried stilts -- discovered that won't work when firing ^6. Have heard of wadding -- will that work in an electric kiln? What would happen if I formed wads made from the same clay as my pots (without adding the other wadding ingredients), bisque fired (or not?) and just sat the pots on those? Is there some other method I should use?

 

 

wildfire-i make and use wadding made from fireclay, sand, and wood dust in equal amounts. add water until right consistency. you can sustitute good 'ol uncooked grits in place of the wood dust for a more meaningful southern experience. fire up to cone 10 - no proble. oh yeah, i do this in an electric kiln, many many times.

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