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rutile conundrum


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#1 Natania

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:39 PM

I recently mixed up a batch of cone 6 glaze (called "Bone" from "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" and fired some ware with it on at school. When I did the same thing at home I got the lovely amber color the glaze is supposed to be. When I fired the new batch at school, it turned out clear (a nice glossy clear, but no color at all) on my whiteware. I thought perhaps I forgot to add the rutile to the new batch. I know my electric kiln at home fires hotter, and even a touch reduction-y perhaps, than the one at school. Would this explain the lack of color, or did I simply forget to add the rutile when I mixed up the batch at school? Hmmm....

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:23 PM

Are they the same color in the bucket? The glaze in the bucket should be a dirty grey-mustard color if you put the rutile in. If it's firing clear you either forgot the rutile or didn't put enough in.
Neil Estrick
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#3 Natania

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:24 PM

Are they the same color in the bucket? The glaze in the bucket should be a dirty grey-mustard color if you put the rutile in. If it's firing clear you either forgot the rutile or didn't put enough in.


It was a dirty grey. I thought I put in the 6% that the recipe called for. I decided to go for it and just added another 6%, so we'll see what I get....

Thanks!

#4 atanzey

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 11:38 PM

I use this glaze, too, and get anywhere from 'bone' colored, to almost clear to sunny yellow, depending on clay body and reduction/oxydation atmosphere. So far, I can't completely predict, although all of the variations are nice.

Alice

#5 Mark C.

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:37 AM

Many rutile glazes are highly variable -thats the beauty of them-never know till you unload.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com




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