Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Sanding down glaze drips on Cone 6 ware


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 clayshapes

clayshapes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 156 posts
  • LocationToronto

Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:07 PM

I experimented with using wire stilts on cone 6 ware recently, and it worked well enough -- that is, the wire did not melt, and the pieces mostly remained standing! -- but I did have a few pooling glaze drips on the bottoms of pieces where they were sitting on the stilts. This was mostly because of the kind of glazes I chose to use (lesson learned). I'd like to grind these bumps down smooth, so that the pieces are stable. What is the best sanding attachment for my drill for this job? I've seen all kinds of sanding discs at the hardware store -- some for removing paint from metal -- some rough synthetic looking discs, and regular sandpaper of various grit levels.
Any suggestion for what to use to smooth down glaze? My dremel grinding stones aren't quite doing the job.

#2 Bill T.

Bill T.

    member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 74 posts
  • LocationGilmer, Texas

Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:51 PM

Attached File  Holder.jpg   12.36KB   58 downloads I use a diamond disc in my dremel tool. Also try to drip some water on it as I grind. Being a sort of new potter I'm always looking for suggestions from more experienced potters, and I picked up this trick. I try to cut a shallow depression near the bottom of each piece to give excess glaze a little place to pool up in. Also wiping with a sponge around the edge of the bottom has helped. Here is a picture of a utensil holder with real runny glaze that this process worked on.

#3 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,985 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 07 November 2012 - 03:39 PM

For working on the bottoms of pots, I think a bench grinder works well. You can grip the pot and hold it to the wheel of the grinder.

Marcia

#4 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 07 November 2012 - 04:57 PM

And don't forget eye protection.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#5 clayshapes

clayshapes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 156 posts
  • LocationToronto

Posted 07 November 2012 - 05:01 PM

I guess I better invest in a grinder. Already have the goggles!

#6 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,985 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 07 November 2012 - 06:13 PM

I have safety glasses. I think someone on here suggested storing them in an old odd sock to prevent them from scratching in a toolbox.
Marcia

#7 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,066 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 07 November 2012 - 10:47 PM

I have safety glasses. I think someone on here suggested storing them in an old odd sock to prevent them from scratching in a toolbox.
Marcia


I have gotten used to using sanding discs on the wheel head-Harbor Freight has some discs that are white, that work extremely well to smooth bottoms and edges after the largest drip areas are ground off. I usually don't get much in runs or drips, but once every 4-5 loads. I use the sanding disc always to just freshen up the base, to make certain nothing is there to scratch a table... When I have problems on the side of the pot with a ground area, I follow up with a soft rubber grinder, then a hard buff with tooth paste to polish to the same as rest of pot. Most small areas cannot be found afterwards. This also works with debris that may fall on plates etc.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 koreyej

koreyej

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 49 posts
  • LocationBouton, Iowa

Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:33 AM

Good tips! Yes, my old bench grinder finally died and I had to replace it with a new one. I had to take off half the safety stuff to use it, though! I wear goggles and a dust mask always, and often my ear protection if I am grinding several pieces in a row. It is one of the most appreciated tools in the studio and takes glaze drips off very nicely. Diamond bits for the dremel get those smaller spaces.

Korey Averill
ka Studios Pottery

www.kastudios.com


#9 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:31 AM

If the drip is small a Dremel tool with various silicon carbide grinding bits may be better. For larger drips use the bench grinder to get most of the glaze off then use the dremel to finish cleaning the drip so nicely that you can't tell it was ever there. You have to be careful because some of the bits that cut the glaze off best will also cut into the clay so use those carefully and finish with broader bits maybe switching to aluminium oxide bits to finish. It sounds a little complicated but it isn't and the bits are cheap.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#10 clayshapes

clayshapes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 156 posts
  • LocationToronto

Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:36 AM

Thanks everyone -- I discovered a wonderful tool for this task at the hardware store that attaches to my drill - a 4 inch disc with a backing pad designed for scraping paint and rust off metal - but works beautifully and quickly to sand down glaze, smooth. I finished it with a light sanding of a finer grit sandpaper...and yes, I wore safety glasses and a mask!
I was using my dremel grinding bits in the past for different kind of drips -- but these were pretty serious drips and this solution worked.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users