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justin1287

Diamond drill bit suggestions

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justin1287    1

need to get some 1/8 drill bits for drilling through glaze......i make products that often have glaze drip through the holes and need a good reliable drill bit....any suggestion of brands/products? Thanks!

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

That is a really good website. I like the instruction pages and rating of various ways to lubricate the drilling.

I have used silicon carbide as an abrasive for drilling, but I prefer diamond. Thanks for the link. I don't have much need for drilling glaze but you never know.

 

Marcia

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Bajamary    0

THis is a little off topic, but reminded me of a great tool. It's a hand held diamond polishing pad. I use it on the bottoms of my pots after final firing and they are as smooth as silk. Go to the web site www.toolocity.com and look for Diamond Hand Polishing Pads, I get the 100 grit one. They are about $10.00 each, and last a long time.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Yes diamond pads are great. I have been using them for several years . I have several different grits.

I have not used the thin pads on that site. They look very useful.

Marcia

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docweathers    79

I have had very good luck drilling glass with some diamond bits that I got from www.drillglass.com. I have not tried drilling ceramic, but I assume they would also drill ceramic.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

What are you sanding with the discs? Greenware, high fired porcelain? My diamond pads have lasted a long time. Some are better that others. The 3M pads were about 7/8 on an inch thick and more flexible the another brand I tried. I think the thin pads would work for my needs. I ended up cutting small bits off my pads , thinned them and used them for my needsI touch up imperfections in the bisque, or tin bits that have stuck to the foot in thee high fire. David Roberts uses them to remove the glaze coat in Naked Clay. I have not done much of that although I love the process and admire the work of others who do it. If you are used adhesive discs on bats, look into silicon carbide discs rather than sand paper. It might work better for whatever it is you are doing.

These pads could be useful but I don't think they'll adhere to a bat.

http://www.toolocity.com/4-jhx-3-step-wet-diamond-polishing-pads.aspx

Marcia

 

 

 

 

 

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Red Rocks    3

THis is a little off topic, but reminded me of a great tool. It's a hand held diamond polishing pad. I use it on the bottoms of my pots after final firing and they are as smooth as silk. Go to the web site www.toolocity.com and look for Diamond Hand Polishing Pads, I get the 100 grit one. They are about $10.00 each, and last a long time.

 

 

BajaMary Where are you in Baja and are these the polishing pads you recommend?

 

JHX dry metal bond diamond polishing pads are designed to polish hard granite and concrete counter tops. They are economical but capable of producing a great finish. They are recommended for use on all granite and concrete counter tops for DIYers. Metal bond matrix help extend the life of the pads. Creamy color of the pads help avoid staining of concrete surfaces. They are recommended for polishing concrete counter tops.

 

  • 2.5mm Thickness
  • Velcro backed and color coded
  • Comes with 7 pieces including 50 grit (Blue), 100 (Yellow), 200 (Orange), 400 (Red), 800 (Green), 1500 (Lime) and 3000 (Brown) grit
  • Dry or Wet use

Or is it these colorful ones?

 

Diamond hand polishing pads are used to perform light on-site polishing/recovering of scratches and other hand polishing jobs. They are ideal for polishing granite, marble, glass and concrete. Electroplated diamond hand polishing pads are more aggressive and suitable for polishing granite and concrete. The electroplated diamond hand polishing pads are also widely used for smoothing out edges of glass. A set of diamond hand polishing pads comes with 7 pads of different grits, 50 grit, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1500 and 3000 grit. 50 grit through 400 grit are electroplated and 800 grit through 3000 grit are resin bonded pads.

 

  • You save $5 when you order in sets compared to order individually.
  • Size: 3-1/2" x 2"
  • Color: 50 Grit - Green, 100 Grit - Black, 200 Grit - Red, 400 Grit - Yellow, 800 Grit - White, 1500 Grit - Blue, 3000 Grit - Orange

All these grits seem like overkill - I would use 50 and 200. What do you use?

 

Many thanks

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Bobg    4

I just use a tile drill bit with lots of water to keep everything cool. Haven't every had a problems with it.

 

bob

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Bajamary    0

Bajamary....is this what you are referring to?

 

http://www.toolocity...d-100-grit.aspx

 

because i really want to get diamond pads too.........sand paper wears out too fast

 

i just put adhesive backed sand paper discs on a bat, put it on my wheel, and sand away at the moment.

 

 

 

Hi, I'm sorry if I'm late posting this. I've been in the states for a little while. We live in a small town called San Felipe on the Sea of Cortez in Baja. It's only 126 miles from the border so I can get back up for "supplies" I use the 50 (green) and the 100 grit (black) and I mostly use them on the bottoms of my pots after glaze firing to cone 6. I like to have a nice smooth bottom so that my customers don't have to worry about the piece scratching their furniture. Just a few minutes by hand with the pad and the finish is nice and smooth. If I have a glaze drip, I have a belt grinder for that. I order from Toolocity, but the invoice shows that they are from Applied Diamond Tools, they have a toll frree number of 800-980-7808... Justin, I've bought one of those sandpaper bats but haven't found it very useful. I.m sticking to the hand pads. Thanks for the info on diamond drills, I'm going to look into that also.

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