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KellyRainey

Pottery Wheel

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KellyRainey    0

Good afternoon everyone! Currently I am a hand builder and that is all I have done since I entered ceramics. I really want to do some work on the wheel but I do not really want to and can't invest to much money right now. So I have been looking at a few beginning or rather "training" wheels :-) that I can learn on until or if I can, shall we say, take off the training wheels. In other words, I need something that if I do not get the hang of it or end up not finding it to be my cup of tea I did not invest a lot of money into it.

 

I have been looking at the following Wheels:

 

Speedball Artista Wheel

11" wheel head, 2 part splash pan included, variable speed (hand control), Micro V-belt for smooth, quiet power and long life. Convenient space for two 2.5 quart buckets, Easy to store. Optional legs available - static or foldable. New 5 year warranty! Comes with 2 free bats, and throwing bucket. It also has an optional foot pedal that can be bought separately.<a name="ClayBoss">Speedball Clay Boss Pottery Wheel

(formerly Creative Industries Clay Boss)

 

 

1/2 HP industrial motor Sturdy steel frame 1/2" thick polyethylene tabletop.

(Table Size: 26" x 21") Large 14" diameter wheel head Reversing plug allows quick change of wheel head direction Sophisticated load-sensing control – maintains wheel head speed under varying loads

 

 

 

 

 

 

If anyone has better options that are extremely affordable please let me know.. Thank you...

Adjustable height feet Centers up to 100 lbs of clay Wheel Head Height 19.5" Five Year Warranty Included are...

 

Free Splash Pan Free "How to Throw" DVD 2 Free bats, Free pair of bat pins

 

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Spend a little more and avoid speedball products. The clayboss is not the wheel it used to be (pre speedball ownership) and the artista is kind of a bad joke. Look at a model b from brent, or a shimpo vl-lite for low-end, decent wheels

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neilestrick    1,381

I love the Artista. I've made 10 pound pots on it before and it works great. But it is not a full size wheel for everyday throwing. It's made for portability. Go for a full size wheel if you have the space. I'm not a fan of the pedal used on the Clay Boss. Hold out for a better quality used wheel.

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Bobg    4

I've had a Clay Boss wheel for the last five years and really like it. My brother who has made pots for the last 35 years stopped on a trip and checked it out. He spent the afternoon making pots and really liked it. He teaches pottery to middle school students and He bought five of them based off what mine was like. He said they haven't had any problems with the in four years.

 

Bob

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Buy the best wheel that you can...check craigslist, ebay, amazon, etc...avoid the cheepies!

Good afternoon everyone! Currently I am a hand builder and that is all I have done since I entered ceramics. I really want to do some work on the wheel but I do not really want to and can't invest to much money right now. So I have been looking at a few beginning or rather "training" wheels :-) that I can learn on until or if I can, shall we say, take off the training wheels. In other words, I need something that if I do not get the hang of it or end up not finding it to be my cup of tea I did not invest a lot of money into it.

 

I have been looking at the following Wheels:

 

Speedball Artista Wheel

11" wheel head, 2 part splash pan included, variable speed (hand control), Micro V-belt for smooth, quiet power and long life. Convenient space for two 2.5 quart buckets, Easy to store. Optional legs available - static or foldable. New 5 year warranty! Comes with 2 free bats, and throwing bucket. It also has an optional foot pedal that can be bought separately.<a name="ClayBoss">Speedball Clay Boss Pottery Wheel

(formerly Creative Industries Clay Boss)

 

 

1/2 HP industrial motor Sturdy steel frame 1/2" thick polyethylene tabletop.

(Table Size: 26" x 21") Large 14" diameter wheel head Reversing plug allows quick change of wheel head direction Sophisticated load-sensing control – maintains wheel head speed under varying loads

 

 

 

 

 

 

If anyone has better options that are extremely affordable please let me know.. Thank you...

Adjustable height feet Centers up to 100 lbs of clay Wheel Head Height 19.5" Five Year Warranty Included are...

 

Free Splash Pan Free "How to Throw" DVD 2 Free bats, Free pair of bat pins

 

 

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Chantay    101

I recently bought a used clay boss. I am very happy with it. I'm not sure about another posters comment about the pedal. My pedal is large, heavy metal, sensitive enough, sturdy. I watched craigs list and bought my wheel and kiln used. No supplier locally.

 

 

 

-chantay

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pattispots    0

I bought my Clay Boss about 5 years ago...being new to wheel throwing (I was a handbuilder also) and not knowing if the love affair would last, I wanted an economical one. The affair is still going strong and I have never regretted buying it. I have used many other wheels in the multitude of workshops I have attended and still love it. I think, too, it's all in what you get used to. Ask 10 potters what wheel they prefer, you'll get 10 different answers. I throw at least 2-3 full days a week, and it has been good to me.

 

I also bought an Arista through Craigslist, and I'm not thrilled with it. I've used it a couple of times....ok in a pinch probably, but not one I'd want to use everyday.

 

Good luck with your decision....

 

 

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I have an Artista which is great as a portable wheel to take to demonstrations or for throwing smaller pieces. My larger wheel is a Bailey which I like. I had a Stewart motorized kick wheel which was a good wheel but my new puppy compelled me to get a wheel without a fly wheel. I was afraid she would get squished.

 

Wheels , as you can see by the opinions and experience, are very varied. You really need to go to a showroom and try a few. Things to consider are: how they fit YOUR body, it the torque what you need for your throwing capacity, is the speed what you like (Bailey wheels are slow and I like that.)

 

Marcia

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koreyej    1

It is important to get something you like, and that will work for you. A bad wheel can put you off of throwing. Brent wheels last forever. Kickwheels are also an option, and usually much less expensive (but you have to move it).

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yedrow    8

Wheels are tools. Often with tools if you are spending the same money it is better to get a well made used tool than a poorly made new tool. In my experience the same is true for wheels Ultimately, the foot pedal is the part you are going to tune your body to.

 

Joel.

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Lucille Oka    16

Kelly,

There really isn't such a thing as a beginner's potter's wheel, there are potter's wheels on which you begin.

 

Try to get the best wheel that you can. Pedals are a very good feature for a beginner as well as a splash pan, bat pins, a directional reversing switch, and also try to get one that has a good throwing capacity of 25lbs or more. One more thing, try to get one with a standard wheel head 12" or 14" inches in diameter so that you can buy standard sized pre-drilled bats.

 

Be patient with yourself when you start. It is good that you have been handbuilding you have been introduced to the clay. When throwing on the wheel you push the clay, don't let it push you.

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oldlady    1,323

Kelly,

There really isn't such a thing as a beginner's potter's wheel, there are potter's wheels on which you begin.

 

 

 

before you really invest in a wheel, is there a place nearby where you can get GOOD instruction on using a wheel?

check out work done by the "instructor" and watch that person conduct a class if you are able. if you think you can learn the basics correctly from this person, take a series of classes. you might even be able to try several wheels.

 

if you cannot find a suitable instructor, buy some of the many basic pottery DVDs available or watch some of the GOOD instructors on youtube.

 

keep looking at craigslist every day using different words, potters wheel, pottery wheel and kiln. you would be surprised to know how many people who are not potters think the kiln they are trying to sell has a brand name of "sitter". they sometimes have more than just a kiln, maybe just the right wheel for you. when you are ready, buy a used wheel if you can wait until one comes up that suits you. if you ever decide to buy a new one, the quiet pacifica wheel i have used since 1972 has served me well. i have a clay boss in another location but i love my pacifica for its silence. i did have to replace the belt in 2010. i have used brent wheels in classroom situations but the pacifica makes a h u g e difference in comfort level. you do want to hear that music you throw to.

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