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digital scale or triple beam balance


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#1 Muddy Girls

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 03:11 PM

I am currently looking to purchase a digital scale. Do I need to invest in one that measures smaller than a gram? Which type is more accurate? Digital or Triple Beam Balance? Thank you MG

#2 Kohaku

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 03:47 PM

Technically, some high-end digital scales can be more accurate than a triple-beam. However, I think that the difference is negligible for the amounts that go into most glaze recipes. Triple-beams are arguably more robust- this is a consideration if you're worried about spills.

If you're making test recipes in the 100 gram range- or smaller- a scale that goes below 1 gram might be (theoretically) useful- but I don't think that a 0.5 gram difference is going to wreck your recipe in too many cases...
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#3 neilestrick

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 04:29 PM

Digital will give you a greater range than triple beam, which is nice when measuring whole buckets of glaze. The only time less than 1 gram will be an issue is when measuring small test batches with small amount of colorants, like 0.25% cobalt carbonate. Ideally, you want something that can do as little as 1/10 gram and up to least 10 pounds. That will work for small test batches and full buckets.

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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:27 PM

My Ohaus triple beam gets down to 1/10 of a gram-built like a tank
My Ohaus digital is the large capacity and does not spilt a gram much but does 5000 grams total.
Ohaus does make two smaller digital scales that I recall go smaller-I got mine from Baileys
Mark
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#5 Muddy Girls

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:28 PM

Technically, some high-end digital scales can be more accurate than a triple-beam. However, I think that the difference is negligible for the amounts that go into most glaze recipes. Triple-beams are arguably more robust- this is a consideration if you're worried about spills.

If you're making test recipes in the 100 gram range- or smaller- a scale that goes below 1 gram might be (theoretically) useful- but I don't think that a 0.5 gram difference is going to wreck your recipe in too many cases...

Thank you Most helpful!

#6 Kohaku

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 05:45 PM


Technically, some high-end digital scales can be more accurate than a triple-beam. However, I think that the difference is negligible for the amounts that go into most glaze recipes. Triple-beams are arguably more robust- this is a consideration if you're worried about spills.

If you're making test recipes in the 100 gram range- or smaller- a scale that goes below 1 gram might be (theoretically) useful- but I don't think that a 0.5 gram difference is going to wreck your recipe in too many cases...

Thank you Most helpful!


No problem... but note Neil's comment (above) about cobalt carb and other high-impact colorants...
Not all who wander are lost

#7 yedrow

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 09:15 PM

I use an AND FW 100K for batches, it is accurate to 10g. For test batches I use an Ohaus dial-O-gram, it's accurate to 1/10th of a gram. For clay I use a cheap postal scale. At work we have a beam scale that is very nice, but I can't remember the make. It is quite old.

I like digital scales, but they are expensive. Outside of the postal scale I got my scales used and quite cheap. I really like the platform scale since it is digital, easy to tare, and has a large working area. The dial-O-gram is the way to go for a triple beam, IMO. It's fast and tares out easy for a beam scale.

Joel.

#8 Brian Reed

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 11:08 PM

I was told by multiple people that for glazes there is nothing better than a triple beam. If you purchased a super acurate digital with micro gram measures then I suppose, but my Ohaus is nicely built and is teh best in my mind.

I am a beginner so I am speaking from recommendations from those that have been doing this for many many years, and my few weeks of experience.



Good luck.
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#9 Denice

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:20 AM

My Ohaus gave out after 30 years, Ohaus told me the magnets were bad, so I decided to go digital. I would recommend buying one that is 150gX.01g for test glazes I have a American Velocity and the lid flips over and makes a tray for your chemicals. For mixing up batches of glaze I have a American Weigh 3000gX0.1g it has a bowl with it. I have been very pleased with both units, my tests and bigger batches are accurate.

#10 neilestrick

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 11:15 AM

I've got a digital from these guys. I mostly use it for big batches and shipping. Their prices are pretty good.

Neil Estrick
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#11 Diane Puckett

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 03:22 PM

Last time I checked, Amazon had a number of very inexpensive digital scales that measured to tenths of a gram.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#12 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 04:47 PM

I have had my triple beam O'haus for over forty years. it has travelled from early stages of my pottery business in Upstate NY, to my personal studio in Montana and now in Texas. It does measure 0.1 gram and if you are doing smaller amounts for tests, you can take that 0.1 and divide it into smaller quantities visually.
I have additional weights that allow quantities up to 2110 grams to be measured at once. Digital scales may do that we'll also. Look on LabX.com for some scales and balances. I have seen all sizes of digital scales there and often triple beam balances. they are listed under lab equipment scales and balances.
As to your needs, you have to determine what quantities you plan to mix.

Marcia

#13 neilestrick

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 08:35 PM

If you get a triple beam, make sure it has a tare poise. With it you can zero out the weight of the container you're using to weigh in. I use a little 3 inch wide dish that holds about 100 grams when doing small test batches. Very convenient.

Neil Estrick
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#14 yedrow

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 01:35 AM

I had an aggravating day with a digital scale at work today so I thought it appropriate to note that when you buy a digital scale you might want to find one that doesn't click off when you are in between materials during a test, augggggg. I would put a chemical in the beaker then get another chemical and while my back was turned the evil thing would time out and turn off. Pure evil I tell you!

Joel.

#15 atanzey

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 06:29 AM

Joel - have you looked for a means to turn that feature off? I think mine did that when I first got it, but it doesn't now.

Alice

#16 yedrow

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:35 PM

Alice,

I don't know that there is one. I'll look though. It is another guy's scale and I'm not that familiar with it. Now that you mention it I think I'll turn it over and see if there is a shut off for the time out feature. Thanks!

Joel.




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