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pottery chic

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most that you would buy are an amalgam of various (cheap) metals....steel's melting point is well above that, definitely not copper

 

i would get various candidates and test them, the only way to be sure that a nail marked 'steel' really can take the temp

 

shrinkage of the clay body could be a factor too, cracking around a non-shrinking metal, you may need to modify to suit the metal additions

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Avoid anything with zinc in it. What exactly are you trying to accomplish? With that information, we may be able to give you more specific advice.

 

I just want these boxes to "look" as if they are "nailed" together. I guess a trip to the hardware store is my next move. Can I assume that since zinc is used in glazes that it's melting point is below cone 6?

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if you just want the look...i would make slightly larger holes (for the shrinkage) and epoxy them in postfire, then you can use whatever nail looks good to you, and probably avoid the firing headaches

 

i do alot of stone additions to my stuff for handles, works great, the clay will break before the epoxy bond

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What type of metal tacks [small nails] will hold up at cone 6 and/or cone 10 firing? I want to use them on seams on hand built boxes.

 

 

You could try stainless steel nails. They may be found often at Lowes or other hardware stores.

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No metal tacks will hold up at cone 10-steel pliers turn to a slag mess (how do I know this?)

The stainless may and I use may will a ?? mark still look like a tack at cone 6-best add them after the fire or make them from clay to look like metal..

Mark

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No metal tacks will hold up at cone 10-steel pliers turn to a slag mess (how do I know this?)

The stainless may and I use may will a ?? mark still look like a tack at cone 6-best add them after the fire or make them from clay to look like metal..

Mark

 

 

I thought the same of most metals, but when at PSU in the 70's another student was doing a series of S&M female sculptures(no other way to describe them politely). These often had nails and other metal pieces embedded in them-sticking out etc. Admittedly many of these would melt, warp etc. but often the nails would leave hollow spikes protruding from the bodies. An interesting effect, especially with the runny shiny metal on the sides of the figure-almost like blood dripping down. I would think that stainless would hold up to ^6, but one only knows if one tries.

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There is a big difference between cone 6 oxidation and cone 10 reduction in how metals respond. As usual, the answer is test, test, test.... We used to fire a lot of pallet wood and construction waste in the wood kilns in grad school. If we missed a nail/screw it would melt through the pots or eat through the floor of the kiln. Personally, I think the best bet is to really push your skills and make the whole thing out of clay and use metallic glazes to get the effect. For example: My lihttp://research-arm.blogspot.com/2009/03/marilyn-levine.htmlnk

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