Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ginny C

Re-attaching handle on almost bone dry pitcher?

Recommended Posts

Ginny C    5

I guess my beautiful pitcher was a bit dryer than the handle I attached, because even though I wrapped them, the handle detached at the bottom, before it was bone dry. It must have shrunk more than the pitcher, I assume, since the pitcher was already a bit dryer. I tried to re-attach it using paper clay mending slip made with vinegar (per Martha Grover), and I held it tightly for a couple of minutes and then re-wrapped it. Today, 4 days later, it has separated again, and this time when I touched it the whole handle fell off, rather than just pulling away at the bottom attachment.

 

Is there any way to fix this? Should I slowly dampen both parts again somehow (how?) and try to re-attach the handle? Or must I give up and ditch the pitcher entirely??

 

Oh- I'm using Laguna B-mix 5 clay and will electric fire to cone 5.

Thanks for any useful suggestions!

Ginny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Benzine    609

I guess my beautiful pitcher was a bit dryer than the handle I attached, because even though I wrapped them, the handle detached at the bottom, before it was bone dry. It must have shrunk more than the pitcher, I assume, since the pitcher was already a bit dryer. I tried to re-attach it using paper clay mending slip made with vinegar (per Martha Grover), and I held it tightly for a couple of minutes and then re-wrapped it. Today, 4 days later, it has separated again, and this time when I touched it the whole handle fell off, rather than just pulling away at the bottom attachment.

 

Is there any way to fix this? Should I slowly dampen both parts again somehow (how?) and try to re-attach the handle? Or must I give up and ditch the pitcher entirely??

 

Oh- I'm using Laguna B-mix 5 clay and will electric fire to cone 5.

Thanks for any useful suggestions!

Ginny

 

 

I would say the best bet, is to slowly work water back into both the pitcher and handle, by wrapping them with a wet paper towel, then covering them with plastic. I've had similar issues, and this solution always works well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Edith Marie    1

I guess my beautiful pitcher was a bit dryer than the handle I attached, because even though I wrapped them, the handle detached at the bottom, before it was bone dry. It must have shrunk more than the pitcher, I assume, since the pitcher was already a bit dryer. I tried to re-attach it using paper clay mending slip made with vinegar (per Martha Grover), and I held it tightly for a couple of minutes and then re-wrapped it. Today, 4 days later, it has separated again, and this time when I touched it the whole handle fell off, rather than just pulling away at the bottom attachment.

 

Is there any way to fix this? Should I slowly dampen both parts again somehow (how?) and try to re-attach the handle? Or must I give up and ditch the pitcher entirely??

 

Oh- I'm using Laguna B-mix 5 clay and will electric fire to cone 5.

Thanks for any useful suggestions!

Ginny

 

 

I would say the best bet, is to slowly work water back into both the pitcher and handle, by wrapping them with a wet paper towel, then covering them with plastic. I've had similar issues, and this solution always works well.

 

 

 

 

Hello Ginny,

 

 

Benzine is correct, I have used some slip as well, and there is magic water CAD on Magic Water that helps stick clay together.

 

Edie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
perkolator    54

 

I would say the best bet, is to slowly work water back into both the pitcher and handle, by wrapping them with a wet paper towel, then covering them with plastic.

 

 

this is what i'd recommend also for trying to attach something to another piece that's slightly too dry, but not yet bone dry. ultimately, i'd recommend you just re-make the whole piece (especially for a wheel-thrown object) since the 2nd version will usually come out better since you'll already know so much more about the piece/method/engineering behind making it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Making a new one will be faster and better.

 

 

This. to the nth degree. Seriously, when I teach beginning ceramics classes I watch belabored attempts to "save" work eat up time and energy that would be better spent remaking the piece (sometimes a few times over...) and in doing so learning better and more effective ways to achieve the desired effects... It is not precious--slake it down and start again with the knowledge you've gained from this failure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dinah    6

Take the handle and spray it with vinegar water to dampen. Wrap it up for a day or so. Dab on vinegar water to attachment ends when ready to attach; place pitcher or body horizontal on props so as to make gravity work for you in re attaching handle. Don't make handle dangle into bloody space on a vertical. Duh! Spray/brush vinegar water on the scored attachment points. It is always a good thing to be able to attach something again. Points made in above posting about starting again and slaking all pieces are also valid if it's a naff pot.

 

BUT it will do your soul good to be able to put the bloody thing back together. I've stupidly whacked off bits to an important piece. Bone dry. I've used the vinegar with dry body clay in a slip formula more times than god's had a hot dinner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lcar    1

I find that starting over usually takes less time and energy, and I encourage my students to do that, but.... sometimes I lose my mind and spend the extra time "saving" something. I find cheese cloth works best to "re-damp" a pot and you can spray it a few times with a water. I worry about attaching handles to pots that are too dry though, and avoid it at all costs. This is because once, (years and years ago), a handle fell off a mug while someone was using it. I was so embarrassed. I'm sure it was because of the difference of moisture between the handle and the mug when I joined them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kohaku    22

smash it in the slop bucket.... make another, better one

 

sorry!

 

 

 

If you'll forgive the disgusting allusion, I find this process to be almost akin to vomiting when ill. Horrible to anticipate, wonderfully cathartic and cleansing when finished.

 

I just smashed and slaked a three-piece fountain last week that had cracked at a joining point. I almost cried as I did it, but it was so satisfying to know that I wasn't going to move forward with a flawed effort...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×