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What to use to draw on stoneware.


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#1 nancylee

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 06:33 AM

Good morning,
Happy Thanksgiving to our Canadian friends, and Columbus Day to Americans! Well, I know we are all Americans, technically, but I didn't want to say USA-ans!

I was inspired to draw some silly faces, etc. on pottery, and have searched around for what to use, and can't find anything that sounds right. Does anyone know of anything that is like colored pencils that can be put on b mix stoneware so that I don't have to paint them on? I would like vibrant colors that stand up under the clear glaze. And what is the best glaze to put over a drawing so tha it isn't dull?

Thanks in advance, I appreciate the generosity you all show here,
Nancy
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Northern Woods Pottery
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#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 09:48 AM

There are ceramic pencils available from some suppliers. They are made by various manufacturers. I think Amaco may make some. There are also chalks or pastels as well.
Marcia

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 10:10 AM

There are ceramic pencils available from some suppliers. They are made by various manufacturers. I think Amaco may make some. There are also chalks or pastels as well.
Marcia

#4 nancylee

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 10:17 AM

Thanks, Marcia. Have you used them?
Nancy
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www.northernwoodsstudio.blogspot.com

#5 SShirley

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:29 AM

Here's a link you might find useful.
http://ceramicartsda...s-and-trailers/

#6 nancylee

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 01:49 PM

Thank you sshirley! The axner pens he talks about might work great!
Nancy
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www.northernwoodsstudio.blogspot.com

#7 perkolator

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:46 PM

those underglaze pencils are pretty handy for drawing. you can also make your own. just simply make an underglaze with the standard equal parts frit, clay, and colorant - mix it into a thick paste and make "crayons" of this rolled up in newsprint. use it pretty much exactly like a crayon/pastel/drawing utensil. you'll still want to glaze over/under the colorant to make sure your colors pop. glaze will be up to you depending on effects wanted (like crazing, running/bleeding, stable, etc)

#8 bobinette

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:57 AM

hello
I'm french and I have found here recipes to make ceramic pens and pencils that suits me. My problem is : i don't understand the word "trailer" (and therefore : what's the difference with pens ?) I've tried various dictionnaries but i always find : "remorque" (attached to a van) or "bande annonce" (related to movie) which doesn't make sens ! Any idea ? Thank you.

#9 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:26 AM

A trailer is a flexible bottle or bulb with a narrow tip. The blue and white, round things in that photo are bulbs. You fill the trailer with glaze, underglaze, or slip and squeeze the trailer as you move it along to create your design. I guess they are called trailers because the liquid trails along behind. The ones with long, narrow, metal tubes give a narrow, controlled line. Using trailers always reminds me of decorating a cake.

As I write this, I keep thinking about you translating it into French.
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#10 bobinette

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 07:47 AM

yes ! I understand !
Posted Image
Am I right ? It's called in french a pear for slip.
Thank you so much !

#11 bobinette

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

the thinest tip i have found on trailers in France is 0.8mm wide (diameter). Do you haver thiner tips in USA ? If the answer is yes, do you think I can use it with a slip or a glaze that had been dry sieved through an 120-mesh screen ? (I hope my english is good enough so that you can understand me ! If not, i really apologize...)

#12 Nancy S.

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 06:21 PM

the thinest tip i have found on trailers in France is 0.8mm wide (diameter). Do you haver thiner tips in USA ? If the answer is yes, do you think I can use it with a slip or a glaze that had been dry sieved through an 120-mesh screen ? (I hope my english is good enough so that you can understand me ! If not, i really apologize...)


I'm not sure if there is anything thinner than 0.8mm diameter...I don't use the bulb (pear) style slip trailers. I actually prefer to use tips made for cake decorating, and the smallest available is size 000 -- which is about 0.8mm. I looked around online for different sizes, and 0.8mm is the smallest I've seen for sale.

You might be able to get a finer line with a hypodermic needle (see the "inner diameter" column at http://en.wikipedia....parison_chart). I don't know where you might find them in France; here in the US, you can often get them at "farm supply" stores because people need them for livestock....though I'm not sure if you can find one that small!

I'm leaving the sieving question up to someone who knows more about that!

#13 Chantay

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

Because the underglaze pencils are hard and don't make a very good line I usually draw what I want first with a soft pencil (6B) then go over it with a slip trailer. If it protrudes to much I go over it with a brayer.

-chantay


- chantay

#14 Diane Puckett

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 09:13 PM

If you look at syringes, the higher the number of the needle, the smaller it is in diameter. Just to add confusion.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#15 Jo-Ann

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 09:52 AM

Bobinette


Try looking for Henna applicator bottles and tips, I think you can find a tip as small as .05 mm

#16 Jo-Ann

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:01 AM

Nancylee

I have used the pencils, I do really like them, after you apply a good clear glaze the colours are nice, the red is red not wine or maroon and the black is black not charcole for example. They are very expensive tho $10 a pencil where I live . . . to save I sharpen them with a knife not a pencile sharpener might not be much of a saving but it makes me feel better. Try buying one or two brite colours and give them a test before making the investment maybe.

#17 bobinette

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

here's a video related to our subject (one day i'll be able to do this...)
At the moment I've made my own pens. I'll tell you wether or not it is satisfying when they will be ready and give the recipe of course! These pens are very expensive in France too ! However I like them very much so I hope my home-made pens will be efficient.




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