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Transfer of Toxic Airborne Manganese Fumes: Kiln to Pool


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#1 J. Shiloh Gastello

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 08:43 PM

Hello everyone,

I am test firing cassius basaltic clay, which releases the dangerous neurotoxin manganese during the firing and the only outlet that is available in a safe location (away from people) is near a pool. I researched manganese and found that this dangerous neurotoxin does mix with water, but the articles did not specify if airborne manganese "fumes" mix with water. To be more specific, Is it possible for excessive amounts of toxic manganese fumes to escape into the pool during the firing?

Assistance would be much appreciated.

Thank you.
J. Shiloh Gastello - Fine Art Studio Artist

Polychrome@comcast.net

https://www.facebook...astelloCeramics

#2 JBaymore

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:20 PM

I am test firing cassius basaltic clay, which releases the dangerous neurotoxin manganese during the firing and the only outlet that is available in a safe location (away from people) is near a pool. I researched manganese and found that this dangerous neurotoxin does mix with water, but the articles did not specify if airborne manganese "fumes" mix with water. To be more specific, Is it possible for excessive amounts of toxic manganese fumes to escape into the pool during the firing?


"Fumes" are actually very fine particulates, not gases. The particulates will settle out of the effluent when they are no longer suspended by the action of the molecules of the air. They are very fine, so this likely will happne far from the kiln's stack exit point as the hot gases disipate into the surrounding cooler air.

The partioculates of course coule be mixed into the water....just like any dust of anything might. Water is not a solute for manganese dioxide (manganese dioxide does not disolve in water). I'd be more concerened about any potential inhalation issues for the fumes rather than worry about skin contact from particles suspended in water. Inges tion might be more of an issue.... except that no one is deliberately going to be drin king large quantities of pool water..... and the concentration you might get there is going to likely be very low.

best,

.................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#3 J. Shiloh Gastello

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 10:49 PM

John,

Your advice has been extremely helpful.

Thank you for taking the time to respond. It is greatly appreciated.
J. Shiloh Gastello - Fine Art Studio Artist

Polychrome@comcast.net

https://www.facebook...astelloCeramics




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