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#1 Brian Reed

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:19 PM

Mission – Bring amobile pottery studio to K-12 institutions to educate young people on the joysand technology of working with Clay

Vision - Develop anew generation of Potters.

Low budgets and shrinking staff at all levels of educationin our country really worry me. Thefirst thing to go are the arts and specifically ceramics. When I was in junior high I took a potteryclass and this started my like life long journey in clay. Without this exposure I may have never knownthis joy.

My plan is to put together a mobile pottery studio andcontract with some schools to do real ceramics classes. Not painting bisque ware (nothing wrong withthat), but real understanding of clay and glazes with formula understanding andminerals and elements and origins of compounds. The way I learned it many years ago. I do not think it is a money making proposition, but one I am passionateabout.

Curriculum

Grades K-3

Learning through play

Development of fine motor skills making pinch pots, glazingwith brushes

Development of gross motor skills by rolling out slabs andusing press molds

Grades 4-8

Elemental education of clay and glaze formulas

Develop skills from pinch, slab, and coil pots

Introduction to wheel throwing

Grades 8-12

In depth look at the elements and how they interact withinthe atmosphere of the kiln.

Advanced slab projects as well as advanced wheel throwing

Glaze chemistry and glaze formulations

More advanced students can attend a local art show orgallery where their work will be displayed and sold once per year



Budget Planning

Reed Pottery charges a flat $200 a class with a maximum of15 students in a class. Paid quarterly in advance.

We require a minimum of 3 classes a week all conducted onthe same day. For each hour of classtime we have about 4 hours of work in prep, firing, and travel.

This equals about $23,000 a year for three weekly classesduring your school year.

How can a smallschool pay for this?

Each year Reed Pottery will conduct a fundraiser based on afew selected works of the students in your school. All proceeds will be collected by the schooland used in your general fund.

Silent Auction and well as live auction for students work aswell as other donated artwork

Dinner will be served during the auction at $25 a plate

Reed Pottery will donate 12 pottery pieces to the school touse in the auction



Do any of you know anyone who has done this or is currentlydoing this? I think I can figure out themarketing and the structure, I was just wanting feedback.


Brian Reed

Throwing down in Washington State

http://www.reedpottery.com

Northwest Clay Club

#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 06:25 PM

I think I saw an article about a mobile pottery lab in Philadelphia. Not sure of the city, but have seen the idea in an article.

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 06:48 PM

This has been done. Called "Claymobile" I think. Might be from Baltimore Clayworks. Search Ceramics Monthly's index.....there was an articel.

best,

................john
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#4 TJR

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:13 PM

Doesn't the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Montana do one? I could be wrong
TJR

#5 Cass

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 08:51 PM

seems like a good idea, not so hairbrained

when schools started cutting back on arts in the 80's my mom did something like that, but out of her little honda civic, she went to schools, brought everything, brought it all back home to bisque in her kiln...spent hours fixing the kids stuff...brought it all back to glaze, back n forth again to deliver...all this for practically nothing, if she made her gas, material and firing costs i would be surprised (not to mention her actual time)

#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 09:28 PM

The Clay Mobile from the Clay Studio in Phildadelphia was a model for such programs. they started decades ago. the work from each class is separated by colored flats and buttons fired with the work. A great organized system. They use many volunteers and resident potters from the lay studio. they also had many grants. it would be a good idea to talk to them.
Marcia

#7 JBaymore

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 06:41 AM

The Clay Mobile from the Clay Studio in Phildadelphia was a model for such programs.


Thanks Marcia... that is the one I was thinking of.

best,

..............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#8 SShirley

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:25 AM

You might check out Kickstarter.com. There is a project on there about a guy starting a mobile art lab (printing, typesetting, etc) that is similar to this fort of program. That might be a way to get funds too.

http://www.kickstart...and-en?ref=live




#9 Edith Marie

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 12:20 PM

Check out this web site http://www.theclayst...ile/gallery.php and in Springfield http://www.springfie...rol/claymobile/

Hope these help ya.

Edie

#10 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:20 AM

The Clay Mobile from the Clay Studio in Phildadelphia was a model for such programs.


Thanks Marcia... that is the one I was thinking of.

best,

..............john

My college friend, Kathryn Narrow , was the one primarily responsible for getting that going. She retired from the Clay Studio as Managing Director ( I think that was her title)
In 2008 or so. They have named a gallery in her honor. She was a tremendous force in the community. She still is!
Marcia

#11 Pres

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:49 AM

Mission – Bring amobile pottery studio to K-12 institutions to educate young people on the joysand technology of working with Clay

Vision - Develop anew generation of Potters.

Low budgets and shrinking staff at all levels of educationin our country really worry me. Thefirst thing to go are the arts and specifically ceramics. When I was in junior high I took a potteryclass and this started my like life long journey in clay. Without this exposure I may have never knownthis joy.

My plan is to put together a mobile pottery studio andcontract with some schools to do real ceramics classes. Not painting bisque ware (nothing wrong withthat), but real understanding of clay and glazes with formula understanding andminerals and elements and origins of compounds. The way I learned it many years ago. I do not think it is a money making proposition, but one I am passionateabout.

Curriculum

Grades K-3

Learning through play

Development of fine motor skills making pinch pots, glazingwith brushes

Development of gross motor skills by rolling out slabs andusing press molds

Grades 4-8

Elemental education of clay and glaze formulas

Develop skills from pinch, slab, and coil pots

Introduction to wheel throwing

Grades 8-12

In depth look at the elements and how they interact withinthe atmosphere of the kiln.

Advanced slab projects as well as advanced wheel throwing

Glaze chemistry and glaze formulations

More advanced students can attend a local art show orgallery where their work will be displayed and sold once per year



Budget Planning

Reed Pottery charges a flat $200 a class with a maximum of15 students in a class. Paid quarterly in advance.

We require a minimum of 3 classes a week all conducted onthe same day. For each hour of classtime we have about 4 hours of work in prep, firing, and travel.

This equals about $23,000 a year for three weekly classesduring your school year.

How can a smallschool pay for this?

Each year Reed Pottery will conduct a fundraiser based on afew selected works of the students in your school. All proceeds will be collected by the schooland used in your general fund.

Silent Auction and well as live auction for students work aswell as other donated artwork

Dinner will be served during the auction at $25 a plate

Reed Pottery will donate 12 pottery pieces to the school touse in the auction



Do any of you know anyone who has done this or is currentlydoing this? I think I can figure out themarketing and the structure, I was just wanting feedback.



Not to put water on your fire, but if there is a healthy living community of artists in an area, why are they not fighting the cuts in the budgets at the local level to make certain that students are getting the education they deserve. This day and age of the "No child left behind" and the high stakes testing is putting too much emphasis on test taking. It is one of the stresses that encourages more emphasis on the academics and less on the unqualifiable arts. I would hate to see the dependency on a Mobile pottery studio that takes the place of a healthy arts program in the schools. At the same time I do realize that there are several public and private school programs out there that fall short of quality. That said, I believe it is indicative that local artists be involved in their schools, many times locals are asked to be on hiring committees when their expertise is needed-make your expertise known to the administrators, volunteer, be involved. At the same time make friends with your local art teachers, search them out find out what their strengths are, and help them where you can. Most of us in the public schools started as art teachers with strong backgrounds in design, drawing, and painting with a shotgun approach to the crafts and other fine arts. After all when you have so many pedagogy classes to take, so many of the non major courses to take, and only a limited amount of time left, it leaves little time for studio and art history. Many time you will find a teacher with a strong background in fabrics, or jewelry, or printmaking, or ceramics teaching in a situation with little need of those media-sometimes those rise to the top to form top notch programs in their area of expertise. Guess I got long winded here, thought is tie to the schools, support and nurture local programs in all the arts, after all they are the future in our media and as our consumers.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#12 JBaymore

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 02:05 PM

It is one of the stresses that encourages more emphasis on the academics and less on the unqualifiable arts.


I think that might be the unQUANTIFIABLE arts. If you can't precisely count it mathematically, it is clearly not important. Education basically as job training, .... not education as education. As a nation we have moved away from teaching people how to think.

best,

........................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#13 bciskepottery

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 04:24 PM

"Not to put water on your fire, but if there is a healthy living community of artists in an area, why are they not fighting the cuts in the budgets at the local level to make certain that students are getting the education they deserve."

This is the parents fight, not the artists. School boards are more inclined to listen to parents. So, if the parents don't object, the cuts will continue. And parents have, by and large, been brain-washed -- by some educators and politicians -- that test scores are the end-all. Those parents who want their children to have art lessons will find a studio or artist to provide what the school does not, same as ballet lessons, etc. Those who cannot afford private lessons, well . . .

#14 Idaho Potter

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 05:31 PM

In my area, the arts were the first cutbacks--followed quickly by music. Seems like the only classes of any import are science and math. The "powers that be" can't or won't realize that if students are to be innovators in the math and science fields, they must also be exposed to and take part in the arts otherwise they will be unable to think "outside the box".

About five years ago, a small group of investors/parents who were alarmed by the lack of creativity offered in the public schools started a private school that would emphasize the arts. Sadly, after two years they were tottering on the brink of bankruptcy. They had the interest, a good bit of the money, but no expertise in setting up and running a school. In stepped another group of people--retired educators, more concerned parents, investors with a vision, some good curriculum and money managers. They recruited some local artists, musicians, and academics, all interested and dedicated to the idea of making it work. It started out as a grades 9 through 12 arts high school, and now enroll students from K-12. The idea must have stirred a lot more interest than first thought, because now it is one of three schools offering college prep courses in academics and the arts.

The public schools are foundering because the basis of their teaching is so tied to tests. They teach classes that will show well on the standardized tests. Federal snd state funds are closely tuned to these tests, and none of the tests are tied to the arts. Pity.

#15 Benzine

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:59 PM

"The public schools are foundering because the basis of their teaching is so tied to tests. They teach classes that will show well on the standardized tests. Federal and state funds are closely tuned to these tests, and none of the tests are tied to the arts. Pity."

While this is indeed true to some extent, many schools try to improve test scores, in weak areas, by having each content area incorporate skills from said categories. While this may be an inconvenience to some content areas, it is indeed better than being cut. For instance, I've taught at a couple schools that were on the "Watching" list. So I've had to incorporate lessons that focused more on reading and writing. Was it a hassle? Not really, because it was essentially things I had been doing anyway. The only extra work I had, was filling out the paperwork saying what exactly I was doing. Sadly, I don't think it was necessary. The grade that performed poorly did remarkably better, when they absolutely had to. It was simply a matter of motivation and effort.

Luckily for the arts, incorporating elements from other content areas is relatively simple. Science, math, history, all blend seamlessly into art.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#16 Cass

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:13 PM

regardless, there needs to be more art in the schools, they need help, that is the reality of the situation as it is..... and this 'hairbrain' idea would be useful and welcome in almost any school system...bravo, bon courage!

#17 Pres

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 09:36 PM

It is one of the stresses that encourages more emphasis on the academics and less on the unqualifiable arts.


I think that might be the unQUANTIFIABLE arts. If you can't precisely count it mathematically, it is clearly not important. Education basically as job training, .... not education as education. As a nation we have moved away from teaching people how to think.

best,

........................john


Word change-yes agreed, I was groping for the right word. And yes the rest of your comment is right on, part of my point. Thank you John

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#18 meisie

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 04:22 PM

In my area, the arts were the first cutbacks--followed quickly by music. Seems like the only classes of any import are science and math. The "powers that be" can't or won't realize that if students are to be innovators in the math and science fields, they must also be exposed to and take part in the arts otherwise they will be unable to think "outside the box".

About five years ago, a small group of investors/parents who were alarmed by the lack of creativity offered in the public schools started a private school that would emphasize the arts. Sadly, after two years they were tottering on the brink of bankruptcy. They had the interest, a good bit of the money, but no expertise in setting up and running a school. In stepped another group of people--retired educators, more concerned parents, investors with a vision, some good curriculum and money managers. They recruited some local artists, musicians, and academics, all interested and dedicated to the idea of making it work. It started out as a grades 9 through 12 arts high school, and now enroll students from K-12. The idea must have stirred a lot more interest than first thought, because now it is one of three schools offering college prep courses in academics and the arts.

The public schools are foundering because the basis of their teaching is so tied to tests. They teach classes that will show well on the standardized tests. Federal snd state funds are closely tuned to these tests, and none of the tests are tied to the arts. Pity.




Pro's and con's of having the tests tied to the arts. In my state not only are they testing the students in math and science the DOE has now developed a new teacher evaluation system and the test scores are one piece of the data for teacher evaluations. I'm kinda glad art is left out because I don't know what kind of test they would come up with and it would most certainly stifle the creativity my students now enjoy.

#19 Lucille Oka

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 12:55 AM

I am not sure what the tests would be but if you read the Federal Standards as they pertain to art, they are great. I especially like the milestones and the incorporation into other subjects. The children and teachers would experience a wider clay culture with new images and techniques that they can employ into their own work; there is nothing stifling about that.
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