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what is the best studio advice you have received?


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#41 Nelly

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 05:57 PM

Best advice:
ALWAYS test a sample of your latest clay delivery before diving in and making a ton of pots with it.

The same should be said for each new batch of glaze you make.

This small precaution can save you a lot of work and money over time.

Don Kopyscinski
Bear Hills Pottery


Dear Don,

Well, after reviewing my previous post...you could be right. I pulled out a bunch of stuff that was just gawd awful. New clay body that did not match my glazes well or my kiln was too hot. Something?? So yeah, okay, you could be right.

But I will still experiment. I just now know I have a pile of bowls waiting for my sledge hammer. They simply cannot be seen.

Nelly

#42 JBaymore

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 10:45 AM

Best advice:
ALWAYS test a sample of your latest clay delivery before diving in and making a ton of pots with it.

The same should be said for each new batch of glaze you make.



Spoken by a wise man who obviously has "been around the block".

I almost bankrupted by pottery business once by not doing that with the clay.

best,

...............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#43 koreyej

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:30 PM

Does it count if the best advice I was given is summed up in "Finding Nemo"?

Just keep swimming!

My struggle to stay in the clay has been a difficult journey since I was 15 years old. Through meaningless jobs, no money or room to pursue my interest, no kiln space, no ceramics programs near my home. I have kept going, kept creating, kept moving forward. 21 years later, I now have a full blown pottery studio in my home. Wheel, kiln, and all. It didn't just fall out of the sky. It is the result of years of work, acquiring equipment, and continuous refining of my craft. The best advice I got is the best advice I have to give to others. Just keep swimming!

Korey Averill
ka Studios Pottery

www.kastudios.com


#44 koreyej

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 04:36 PM

My husband told me in regards to the first thing I ever made, "Do you want to take a hammer to that, or do you want me to?"

It makes me smile just thinking about it. I have to admit smashing that teapot was very satisfying.


lol That's one of the best things I have taught my students: How to Properly Smash a Pot. These things are not precious, they are just clay. If it's fired, and it's bad, by all means smash it into little pieces! It sure helps get over the disappointment of a bad pot, or a glaze that failed miserably.

Korey Averill
ka Studios Pottery

www.kastudios.com


#45 Tara M B

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 08:51 PM

A teacher picked up one of my finished pots, felt the bottom and informed me that I was "too good of a potter to leave the bottom like that". I wasn't a good potter... But I realized that it didn't take skill to smooth out the bottom. It always stuck with me as something I could control.

#46 yedrow

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 09:18 PM

Hmm, I forgot one, "Shut up and load the kiln. I'll put you on the wheel when I'm ready."

#47 Nelly

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 10:00 PM

Hmm, I forgot one, "Shut up and load the kiln. I'll put you on the wheel when I'm ready."


Dear All

From a world reknown majolica artist/historian/academic--"the world does not need anymore ashtrays or bad pots--either do it right or don't do it at all."

Nelly

#48 Chantay

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 02:27 PM

[quoteFrom a world reknown majolica artist/historian/academic--"the world does not need anymore ashtrays or bad pots--either do it right or don't do it at all."
][/quote]



I'm cracking up over this one. Last week someone wanted to custom order an ash try (cigar size, please).:blink:
- chantay

#49 kathi

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:35 PM


My husband told me in regards to the first thing I ever made, "Do you want to take a hammer to that, or do you want me to?"

It makes me smile just thinking about it. I have to admit smashing that teapot was very satisfying.


lol That's one of the best things I have taught my students: How to Properly Smash a Pot. These things are not precious, they are just clay. If it's fired, and it's bad, by all means smash it into little pieces! It sure helps get over the disappointment of a bad pot, or a glaze that failed miserably.



I have a wonderful 2 lb sledge hammer!
My first pottery teacher told me, "Don't get emotionally attached to your pottery."
I have a gravel floor in my kiln room; to that, I have added a great deal of smashed pottery. It actually looks kind of great.....

#50 Lucille Oka

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:58 PM

I used to make every tool, 'doo-dad' and 'doo-hickey' I needed, and maybe wanted to use in the future. One day one of my professors simply said, “Lucille you don't have to make every tool.” It was an epiphany. I hadn’t realized that while I was working out this and that I could have just as easily bought the tool I needed. Now before I think of making a tool I 'need', I see if it is readily available. If it is, I'll buy it, if it is not I might make it but only if I really, really need it. I have no more excuses for not working.


John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#51 slurriedthoughts

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 11:26 AM


sometimes when i read the questions from new members i wonder if they have ever read any pottery books, talked to experienced potters, taken classes or in any way prepared themselves for the roller coaster they got on when they first touched clay. some of you are kind enough and patient enough to answer even the most elementary questions. i think i have lost my patience with the impersonal internet questions that cover the same ground over and over. if that questioner were right there in front of me, i would be much more involved and able to answer the most basic question politely and in detail but the written question makes me want to ask the writer if they know that what they are asking is already answered somewhere in the archives. look there first.

maybe i am just getting old and grumpy. or maybe i am just stalling about getting out to the studio and mixing up the glazes i need for an upcoming show.


Funny this should come up this morning as I have been thinking about the forum as I did other chores ... reflecting on how well this forum has worked out. We do have a place where newbie questions are answered with respectfully presented information. None of the "Why don't you check the archives first" stuff that is often seen on other forums.

When I was on the Board of the Potters Council, we saw the need for a "newbie friendly" forum and thanks to ACerS and the Potters Council this is what became of the idea. Biggest thanks to ALL of the people who ask and answer questions. We are slowly but surely building up a base of experienced potters who are not necessarily 'Names' but have years and years of solid, on the ground experience to share. Slowly but surely lurkers are coming out with their first posting to ask or answer a question. Subjects that would have flamed other forums to a standstill have been dealt with easily and openly without harsh words.

I hope I never get tired of answering questions ... the only reason I am where I am in pottery is because other people took the time to answer mine. The only dumb question is the one you don't ask because you are afraid to, or don't want to look clueless or whatever.

So here is where I welcome lurkers to post, newbies to ask and all to answer. The WELCOME mat is always out.

Oh yes, on topic ... the best advice I ever got on any subject was to ask the question.



#52 slurriedthoughts

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 11:35 AM

I am one of Chris's "lurker newbies" but learning so much from these forums...I spend way too much time reading you guys...however, once I get into my shop I feel more confident and willing to experiment. I am sure it's because my working time is so isolated...it's just me out there with my mud ! After reading the lessons and advice that you all are so generous in sharing I feel like I am not alone on this creatively fun road I have chosen to take. Thank you all!!! Please keep sharing and do not ever think you are not being heard....I HEAR you and DEPEND on you to teach me. Hopefully one day I will be giving the advice from experience that you all do.
Oh, and my favorite mantra? "Fake it 'till you make it"
Thanks !! Kristi

#53 JeanB

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:09 PM

Chris, your 'newbie friendly' forum is a godsend. Its been a big confidence booster to know that if I am stuck, I can ask questions. This alone encourages me to forge ahead with new techniques. Living in a rather remote village in South Africa, I was persuaded to start teaching 4 years ago and wouldn't have dreamt of it if there was no-one to turn to for advice. So thank you for being there and for creating a welcoming vibe where one can ask questions without fear of being mocked!
My best advice was given to me by a young man who I started on the clay path when he was 7 years old. Now selling his work in New York, I told him that I was sometimes uninspired and couldn't start work. He said 'Just go to your studio and start tidying up and you will get inspired'. Out of the mouth of babes! Well, it works for me. I go to the studio and as you know, there is always some mundane maintenance to do. It seems having your mind relaxed and without pressure to perform, ideas start flowing quickly and clearly. I really recommend it and if all else fails, your studio will bein better shape!

#54 RemosMom

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:38 PM



Hi~

I mostly lurk but thought I'd pop in on this thread. A very wise potter and friend told me to never fall in love with anything I create Posted Image


For me, it was "when given lemons make lemonade.'
The point of this comment was when something you make does not turn out as expected, look for something new in it and consider other possibilities. Doing this has kept me fresh in my approach.

Another one was "if you don't know what to do copy the next guy." This advice has also helped me to learn that my creation will never be the exact same as "the other guy" as I will put a new spin on it and it will definitely be different.

Nelly



Best Advice....hard to pin point just one....from a friend who also introduced me to pottery, "set aside an evening during the week after work and a morning during the weekend to play with clay".


Thanks for sharing that! I haven't touched clay in about 7 years, but have the itch and just ordered some videos through Ceramics Art Daily. I am going to begin with donating time one evening and one weekend morning planning and dreaming of a space to work in... set a goal and work toward it! Thank you God for inspiration!

... and on the subject... "grumpy" everyone has a bad day... I'm sorry this was yours. I am grateful to the many generous potters I know....
Posted Image

#55 Paris2

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 09:30 AM

Thank Oldlady fot this topic ! I admit, I'm a beginner but I love ceramics and all these advices are very useful! Thank you very much!

#56 Joy pots

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:39 AM

I was advised to keep 1 piece every year that you just could not part with, as a result I have many pieces from over the years .

#57 JBaymore

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:52 AM

I was advised to keep 1 piece every year that you just could not part with, as a result I have many pieces from over the years .


You are proactively preparing for your retrospective exhibition. ;)

best,

...............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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