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Has anyone shot a video?


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#1 Chris Campbell

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:41 AM

I'm thinking of shooting a pottery video and would welcome any and all ideas and technical input.

I have a good 35mm camera that shoots video ... Would this be enough?
Can I use the same lights as I do for photo images?
What software do you edit with? I have Apple computers.
I would like it to have multiple segments ... Do I need to get a professional's help?
How can you make multiple copies of it easily?

Chris Campbell
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#2 Rebel_Rocker

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:12 AM

I take it your camera is digital. So making copies is as easy as copy/pasting it on your computer.

That camera should be great for it, I doubt anyone uses much more. As it's probably for the web anyway the digital format is perfect. You probably have settings for how large you want it, you tube is like 320 pixels or 480 pixels. You don't need higher as it will just take up a ton more memory.

I'd be surprised if your camera or computer didn't come with at least a basic editing package. They are easy to overlook if you started using those items but never looked at using video, but it should be on the program disc.

video editing is pretty easy these days. plug in your camera (probably usb or firewire- should have cable with camera too... or maybe just plug your memory card into computer)

Then open your program and open a file (your video clip). Usually it will appear in the timeline and there is a scissors tool to cut it, then you can delete parts of it you don't want. move the pieces around. add a music track, etc...
Then export.

Segments... do you want to have it all in one video? or do you want to upload part 1 this week, part 2 next week? You can just cut the clip, export part one. then recut it (start fresh) and export part 2, etc...
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More info to help us would which specific apple computer you will use, specific camera make/model... And what you plan to do (you tube, dvd production)


looks like apples now come with iMovie
http://www.alifesoft...0211128316.html

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Lighting is actually more forgiving in video. Of course that depends on quality too, most you tube video isn't necessarily professional dvd production. But film just picks up light better, and since you aren't staring at one image that never changes the light doesn't have to be as good anyway. But it's easy to set up your camera, do a quick clip and watch it and see if you need more light. (you can lighten up a video in software too)

#3 Chris Campbell

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:48 AM

The camera is a Canon 7D and I have Photoshop Elements ... probably the least intuitive product they make!
End use of the video is still in the debating stage ... I guess it depends on how well it turns out.

Chris Campbell
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#4 Rebel_Rocker

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 12:47 PM

photoshop elements is just for pictures.

Do you have imovie? what mac OS do you have? I don't use mac but i bet imovie is probably a pretty easy program to edit with.

it's a very nice camera so I'm sure you'll have no problem getting great looking video. My camera is 2 megapixels and 12 years old and it does alright :) Yours is about 1,000x nicer. Looks like you can shoot HD video
(Full HD video at 30p (29.97 fps), 24p (23.976 fps) and 25p with an array of manual controls, including manual exposure during video shooting and ISO speed selection)
So that would be DVD quality. Sounds like you have a good lighting set-up for pictures already (which you may or may not need).

So the biggest issue is probably just figuring out which video software you have and how to use it.
I couldn't find any info on your camera coming with software (other than a plug in for an adobe video program that probably costs over 1 k).

Also how large of memory cards you have. At full 1920 res you can only capture 4 gb clips (guessing 30 seconds to a few minutes). But at 640 (more than you need for you tube) you can probably get 10+ minutes. But you need at least 4 gb cards.

#5 Marc McMillan

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 02:22 PM

I'm a Mac guy and they have very good software to do just what you are looking for.
iMovie is a very good editing software. I suggest you use that. In short order you will be able to create movies that are awesome.
iDVD will allow you to create segments or chapters and burn it onto a disk.

The combo of the two will get you what you want.

Good luck,

Marc

#6 Chris Campbell

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 02:27 PM

Thanks so much ... I have all that software so I guess I just have to start learning to use it. :D

Chris Campbell
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#7 Pres

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 09:42 PM

Thanks so much ... I have all that software so I guess I just have to start learning to use it. :D


I used to shoot video in school for lessons, and some tutorials. One big tip on these if you can borrow a second camera do it. Using an editing program, I used Premiere, will allow you to splice the two cameras together into a more interesting product. Changing shots while you shoot is tough, and this will make it easier. An non linear editing program like Premiere Elements will allow you to do almost anything you want to do, and add your dialogue after wards to smooth out the transitions on the project. Make certain your lighting is from several directions to eliminate unwanted shadows. You can also steal a frame from the video, take it into Photoshop, add titling, credits etc and then take it back into Premiere. Even though Premiere has title effects, this allows a little more still effect creativity. Sometimes too many bells and whistes like transitions, fades, flying titles and such will ruin more than help. Good luck.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 JBaymore

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 09:50 PM

Chris,

Would you be better off doing what YOU do best and making claywork and doing workshops with all the time you'd invest in learning to shoot and edit good video......... and then hire someone who has the video production skills to do the video work and give you a more professional product? Maybe trade a few pieces for part of the price too?

Just a thought.

best,


....................john
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Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#9 Mark C.

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:54 PM

Chris
I have made a few
years ago I did one for survivor.
First one I story boarded and a had a friend shot it and edit it.I started with a raku night scene.

The next one was an underwater one I shot and edited with IDVD which is on most macs . It very easy to use.
That all said my friends was far better than mine as he knew his stuff.
Mark
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#10 trina

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 06:56 AM

Hi there,

I made a video of me making a big mural. The biggest thing to learn is move the camera SLOWLY. You can always get help with the Teci stuff but jerky and fast moving scenes are terrible to watch. This is what not to do :)



#11 Chris Campbell

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:44 AM

Trina, your video was awesome ... Maybe not technically professional level ... but a perfect insight into how beautiful art builds and enhances a community ... The final piece was lovely and I am sure it is a beloved local landmark. Thanks so much for sharing.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

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#12 Chris Campbell

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 09:48 AM

You have a good point John, but last time I talked to a pro about doing one I was boggled by the room he needed for lights and cameras, the idea of scripts and story boards ... Or maybe .., now that I think of it ... Maybe it just scared me to take it so seriously. Hmmm... Something to think about considering my new favorite saying below.

Chris Campbell
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#13 JBaymore

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 10:06 AM

You have a good point John, but last time I talked to a pro about doing one I was boggled by the room he needed for lights and cameras, the idea of scripts and story boards ... Or maybe .., now that I think of it ... Maybe it just scared me to take it so seriously. Hmmm... Something to think about considering my new favorite saying below.


Chris,

In my life, I've found that ceramic artists first thoughts on getting something done always seem to head immediately to "I'll do it myself". Our tendency toward self-reliance is sort of a curse. We are always thinking of how doing it ourselves will "save" us money (that we often don't have anyway). But sometimes the "cheapest" and best way to get something done................ particularly when it is really important..... is to "hire a professional".

I bet if you have a toothache you don't pull your own tooth. ;)

I've attempted to do some video work... and so far, approaching the idea has taught me that as a visual artist... I know too much about what a GOOD piece of film/video would look like. So with the level of expectation I have for the end product representing me, I'd want a "professional job". For ME to get to that level of work would take a HUGE investment of both time and money (in equipment like the right mikes for really good sound, extra camera for A-B roll shots, professional level titling and effects software, etc.). I'm still playing with learning to do it... and maybe someday I'll do something...... but it is a daunting task.

Most of us have learned to take our own photographs of our work and have invested in that aspect of "media". We've bought lights and backdrops and film and digital cameras. Some of us have gotten pretty good at that.... others, not so much. So with the trend toward video/media becvocoming so important in the life of an artist, ........ maybe this is just something that HAS to happen.

But just as poor quality photos (of great work) do things like limit acceptance into exhibitions, publications, and such..... I wonder what poorer quality videos actually do to an artist's situation. I know I hate to watch stuff that is basically a "glorified home movie".

This is a whole new can of worms.

best,

........................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#14 SShirley

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 11:56 AM

Trina,

That was wonderful! I loved the mural AND the video. It was such a big project! How long did it take you to make the mural?

Sylvia

Hi there,

I made a video of me making a big mural. The biggest thing to learn is move the camera SLOWLY. You can always get help with the Teci stuff but jerky and fast moving scenes are terrible to watch. This is what not to do :)

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=N59SoQLbM44



#15 trina

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:10 PM

Trina,

That was wonderful! I loved the mural AND the video. It was such a big project! How long did it take you to make the mural?

Sylvia


Hi there,

I made a video of me making a big mural. The biggest thing to learn is move the camera SLOWLY. You can always get help with the Teci stuff but jerky and fast moving scenes are terrible to watch. This is what not to do Posted Image

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=N59SoQLbM44


Hi there,

Thanks! It took me about 3 months from start to finish. It was a really big thing to do and cost me a few sleepless nights. The miracle was that not one single tile got broken or needed to be remade. If I remember correctly there are about 200 tiles. I wish that I had invested in one of those mountable time frame cameras that take a picture every two minutes or so. I think that would have been better of me zooming all over the place. :) Anyway I learned from this and agree with John, if you really want it to be something great hire hire hire someone. T

#16 neilestrick

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 02:56 PM

In addition to good camera work, lighting in VERY important. That's why the pro needed all that scary gear. Just like when you shoot slides of your work, the color of the lights will dramatically affect how good the images look. If you try to shoot a video lit by incandescent or fluorescent lights, the color will be really bad, unless your camera can correct for it. I know your camera can color-correct in photo mode, but I'm not sure about video mode. But even then, shadows and such will can ruin it. Big, soft lights that reduce shadows, with good color are really essential to making a professional looking video.
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#17 JBaymore

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 03:14 PM

I've been involved in TV production shoots as "on camera talent" for a couple of shows a few times and also been on-camera in numerous interviews and news shows and such. The time spent on stuff like lighting and sound and such behind the scenes in a professional shoot is pretty amazing. In the end... all that attention to detail shows in the final product. There is a reason why pro video / film production is so darn expensive.


best,

.......................john


PS: I can remember re-shooting scenes over and over and over and over to get it "just right"...... hours of work for less than a minute of final screen time.
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#18 oldlady

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 09:15 PM

would some of you who know enough please tell Ceramic Arts Daily to get a professional videographer and plan shots so we do not watch the back of someone's hand or a face and miss what the fingers are doing? and get a plain background so it is not so distracting???
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#19 JBaymore

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 10:32 AM

..........tell Ceramic Arts Daily to get a professional videographer and plan shots................


In the end... all that attention to detail shows in the final product. There is a reason why pro video / film production is so darn expensive.


How much does CAD charge for those free videos? ;)

best,

................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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