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If you are making leaf ash for glazes...........


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#1 JBaymore

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 10:13 AM

In Japan it is somewhat typical for many potters to burn various plant materials to make pure ash (of various types) for use in glazes. Some western potters do this also. Brother Thomas did this for a lot of his glazes.

I saw this item and thought..... hum.... nice idea.

http://www.drpower.c...tm_medium=email

best,

.................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#2 JLowes

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 10:22 AM

There are several videos on YouTube by gindaup (Gary Navarre) about a burner made from bricks he calls a Koie Cooker after the Japanese potter, Ryoji Koie, that showed him how to build and fire it.

http://www.youtube.c...c.1.g9E4y8WMsXw

I haven't tried it, but it seems like it would work. It is not as sophisticated as the stainless steel one, but I doubt it woul cost $349 plis shipping either.

John

#3 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 11:09 AM

That BurnCage is genius. Thanks for sharing John. It's a bit expensive though and, living in Europe, I can't order it from drpower. I will search the web if I can find something similar here in the old world....:D

Evelyne

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#4 JBaymore

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 12:08 PM

That BurnCage is genius. Thanks for sharing John. It's a bit expensive though and, living in Europe, I can't order it from drpower. I will search the web if I can find something similar here in the old world....:D


Evelyne.

Well I imagine you COULD order it... but the shipping would require a mortgage. ;)

However, if you don't go with stainless.... you can maybe fabricate one from cheaper materials. The stainless is nice because it does not add much iron scale though.

The IDEA is pretty sweet.

best,

.................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#5 JBaymore

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 12:19 PM

I haven't tried it, but it seems like it would work. It is not as sophisticated as the stainless steel one, but I doubt it woul cost $349 plis shipping either.


John,

If you have a lot of brick laying around...... it is just the cost of the construction time. And note that you can make these using red brick also. The temperatures you hit don't actually require firebrick. And certaily low duty firebrick are more than adequate for this too.

If you bought new HD firebrick for building that "Giant" one Gary shows... it likely would cost well MORE than the stainless one ;) .

best,

..............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#6 yedrow

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 08:17 PM

I just had an idea, now someone tell me why it won't work, lol. I was thinking, couldn't you put a sagger full of leaves (or whatever you want to make ash from, and just put it in a bisque firing? Or is the volume too low to make it worthwhile? Or, would it fuse too much?

Joel.

#7 JBaymore

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 09:18 PM

Joel,

For the most part, the volume is too low. A lot of "stuff" makes a tiny bit of ash. Other wise... it would work OK.

best,

...............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#8 SmartsyArtsy

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 09:58 PM

I think if one rummaged around a recycled materials shop there would be a selection of grates and registers, etc to fabricate a burn box yourself. The dr company is a past client of mine from my graphic design days.




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