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Red Rocks

Infuential Books

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Red Rocks    3

I just finished reading the old thread on potter's who influenced your life, started by Marcia. How about an off-shoot? "The top 5 books on pottery that influenced you the most. I would list mine as:

 

- Marguerite Wildenhain - The Invisible Core: A Potter's Life and Thoughts

- Bernard Leach - The Potter's Challenge

- Michael Cardew - A Pioneer Potter

- Charles Counts - Pottery Workshop

- Frederick Olsen - The Kiln Book

 

I am always looking out for new books (or old ones for that matter) on pottery and the philosophy of pottery – so hopefully this will start a thread of us sharing books that have inspired us.

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Mark C.    1,797

Getting it down to 5 is hard

HAMMADA,potter

Clay and glazes for the potter-Rhodes

Stoneware and Porcelain-Rhodes

The Kiln book-Olsen

The art of Firing-Nils Lou

 

runner -up all studio potter issues

Mark

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Wendey    0

I just finished reading the old thread on potter's who influenced your life, started by Marcia. How about an off-shoot? "The top 5 books on pottery that influenced you the most. I would list mine as:

 

- Marguerite Wildenhain - The Invisible Core: A Potter's Life and Thoughts

- Bernard Leach - The Potter's Challenge

- Michael Cardew - A Pioneer Potter

- Charles Counts - Pottery Workshop

- Frederick Olsen - The Kiln Book

 

I am always looking out for new books (or old ones for that matter) on pottery and the philosophy of pottery – so hopefully this will start a thread of us sharing books that have inspired us.

 

 

Michael Cardew - Pioneer Potter

Robin Hopper - Functional Pottery

Leila Philip - The Road Through Miyama - memoir about living in a small Japanese village as a pottery apprentice.

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IronMike    0

Here are my top five:

- Out of the Earth, into the Fire: A Course in Ceramic Materials for the Studio Potter

- The Ceramic Spectrum by hopper

- Glazes from Natural Sources by Brian Sutherland

- Wood-Fired Stoneware and Porcelian by Jack Troy

- Gas Burners for Forges, Furnaces, and Kilns by Michael Porter

 

 

 

Then if you are into wood fire like me look into "The log book" series. by Coll Minogue and Robert Sanderson

 

 

 

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I would say

for my education early on in ceramics:

- Bernard Leach - The Potter's Book

- Michael Cardew - A Pioneer Pottery

-Stoneware and Porcelain; the Art of High Fired Pottery by Daniel Rhodes

-The short Kiln Building book by Paul Soldner

-The Potters' Alternative by Harry Davis + the Studio Potter Book 1978

 

and some other favorites for looking at how others made their way in ceramics:

-Grand Feu Ceramics- Taxile Doat

biography of Bernard Palissy by Leonard Amico

Glory in Porcelain , biography of Adelaide Robineau by Peg Weiss

The Ceramics Career of M Louise McLaughlin

Mad Potter of Biloxi

 

Marcia

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Amy Waller    7

10,000 years of pottery by Emmanuel Cooper (earlier printings/editions titled Ten thousand years of pottery)

 

Pottery analysis: a sourcebook by Prudence M. Rice

 

Pottery in the making: world ceramic traditions edited by Ian Freestone and David Gaimster

 

Gifts of the Nile edited by Florence Friedman

 

Ceramics from Islamic lands by Oliver Watson

 

I love these book threads.

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Red Rocks    3

There are some really great books listed here…should really add some inspirational books to our reading lists. I saw Marcia called out a book about George Ohr, the mad potter of Biloxi. A really amazing character – if you have never heard of him, you should definitely look him up. He was someone way ahead of his time.

 

 

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

There are some really great books listed here…should really add some inspirational books to our reading lists. I saw Marcia called out a book about George Ohr, the mad potter of Biloxi. A really amazing character – if you have never heard of him, you should definitely look him up. He was someone way ahead of his time.

I visited his museum in Biloxi last year. it is a growing institution and awesome museum.

Marcia

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Piccolpasso's Three Books of the Potter's Art add to my list!

 

is a great book on traditions during the renaissance. I visited the De Gracie Pottery in Deruta, Italy in 2004 where they were still practicing traditions for majolica production as described in the book.

 

The Studio Potter's Book , add this one too. Very resourceful.

 

Marcia

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Pres    896

I mentioned this one in another thread or two, Penland School of Crafts, Book of Pottery. Ten influential potters from the 60's talking about their work and graphically demonstrating pieces they have done. A short gallery with each potter. Notables are Reitz, Turner, Larsons,  Bringle, Peiser, and Takaezu. Work that I have admired for years, and have borrowed from in my own work.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Alexandra Copeland wrote a great little book for discovering ceramics collections in Europe. I have used it often.She was a presenter at the Majolica conference in Toronto in 1992. She had them for sale there.

 

A Guide to Ceramics in European Museums

organized by countries.

 

Marcia

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Biglou13    202

Kilns..... Rhodes

Japanese woodfired ceramics- kusakabe

Clay glazes....... Rhodes

Stone ware and porcelain- Rhodes

 

Only 4. But I just found art of firing in a reference library.

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Natania    6

I just finished Emmanual Cooper's biography of Lucie Rie. Very inspiring and interesting to read about her life and that of Hans Coper. Also, the Pot Book by Edmund de Waal is a fun coffee-table type book, and he lists artists who work in a similar way on each page. This is a fun aspects as it can send you on a little journey of research and appreciation. The pots are listed alphabetically (by their makers) so you get some interesting juxtapositions as well.

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smb    0

Can anyone recommend some books on 18th ,19th century functional pottery. I am wanting to throw some historically correct mugs, bowls, pitchers, etc.

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ChenowethArts    461

My Top 5 list is a mixed bag of things...but I seem to come back to these:

And thanks to all... I will be adding several of the recommendations in this thread to my wish list!

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Mark369    6

The Potter's Complete Book of Clay and Glazes by James Chappell

Clay and Glazes for the Potter by Daniel Rhodes

Ceramics A Potters Handbook by Glen C Nelson

Clay Bodies by Robert Tichane

Ceramic Formulas: The complete compendium by John W Conrad

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I am repeating myself for the most part. But these are the first ones that pop into my head.

 

The Potters Booka by Bernard Leach

16th century Piccolpasso's Three books of the Potter

Bernard Pallisey' s biography of his trials and errors in majolica 17 or 18th century

The Potters Craft pre Charles Binns. 19th century

 

I had a copy that belonged to Dave Finklenberg's Aunt Augusta who lived in Montana

Grand Feu Ceramics by Taxile Doat who worked at the Sevres Porcelain factory before coming to the US to work at the Women's university in St. Louis with Adelaide Robineau.

Paul Soldner's kiln book more like a monograph.

The AP Green Pocket manual with brick combos for arches.

 

Marcia

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JBaymore    1,432

I "grew up" on "A Potters Book"....... it was the 'bible' when I started clay.

 

best,

 

..................john

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Chilly    329

I "grew up" on "A Potters Book"....... it was the 'bible' when I started clay.

 

best,

 

..................john

I can't believe my county library don't have a copy of this book.  :angry:

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I agree with John, the Potters Book was a Bible. I reread it when I started working with oil burners and that part made sense the second time around after experiencing clinker buildup from poor combustion. That helped tremendously in redesigning our oil burner adaptation with three nozzles. The burners were published in the Studio Potter Book in 1973!

Thank you, Sir Leach.

Marcia

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