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Bobg

Chattering?

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Bobg    4

I've been watching some video's on YouTube on chattering. But, they never have said how dry the piece needs to be to do it. Anyone got any suggestions? The first pots I tried it out on we're drier than I normally like when trimming( it was hot out and I didn't get back to them soon enough).

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

Bob

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Mark C.    1,798

Are you trying to prevent or do you want chattering?

I'm unclear on what you want?

Mark

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Bobg    4

Hi Mark,

 

Sorry about not specifying what I wanted.

 

I do want chattering on my pots. Just never seen it mentioned how dry they need to be. I first pots I tried it on were just past the hard leather stage.

 

Bob

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Mark C.    1,798

Chatter occurs when the clay is as you said just past leather hard to leather hard-the speed and trim tool will also affect this.

I have spent most of my years trimming trying to AVOID chattering .

For me it occurs easier when pots are past idea moisture state to trim ( that is drier than I'd like) I also notice that a broader trim tool seems to make it jump (chatter more) as well as a certain RPM. I use a smaller tool and change up rpm's to avoid as well as rewet pot

As noted I always try to avoid this so its harder for me to say exactly how to get this.

Hope this helps you.

Mark

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ayjay    119

I am far from from being an authority on this (or much else), but I've recently started playing with the idea myself and have made precisely two chattered pieces.

 

I did mine on the wheel, right after they were thrown. I also made my own chattering tool so it's possible that that may not be working correctly either. One was only bisque fired at the weekend and it's awaiting glaze and the other I've dared to take a pic and put it below.

 

They are a long way from the finished article, but we all have to start somewhere and I am still experimenting and enjoying experimenting.

 

 

Hopefully someone will be along who knows more than me. :)

 

Edit: I took so long writing that and taking pics that they already have.

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yedrow    8

I like to chatter pieces when the clay is leather hard, about the consistency of a block of cheddar cheese. If it's a little wetter the force can push through and leave marks on the other side, and if its too dry the tool will tend to slip along the surface and not dig in. Also, you have two angles to work with, that of the tip of the tool (lateral so to speak) and that of the tool itself (longitudinal). You can change these to get a better 'dig' in the clay and to alter the pattern.

 

Joel.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Chattering happens when the clay is beyond leather hard but also depends on the speed AND the angle of your tool.

Like Mark I try to avoid it, but it can be a very cool pattern.

Marcia

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yedrow    8

Yes Marcia, that's a chattered piece, thank you for the compliment :)

 

Alice, I have a couple that need editing. I'm on a deadline for getting work done on a building and these days I'm so busy I can't even imagine surviving this phase of my existence. I got some time off last night and I should have done that.

 

Joel.

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LilyT    1

Joel, that's beautiful, such nice form and balance.

 

Take some time for yourself so you don't burn out!

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Brian Reed    23

I have been playing around with Chattering for about 6 months now and have enjoyed the journey. Here is a recent bowl. I like the accidental nature of the chatter and the simple way it is made.

 

 

 

I always do the chatter at high speed on the wheel with a sharpened tool. The clay will need to be a little beyond leather hard as many have stated above. place the cutting edge lightly and at a sharp angle to the pot surface. I then listen for the right frequency that I am looking for and then move it to the right rhythm down the pot from the smallest point to the widest point of the pot.

 

 

IMG_2960.JPG

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LilyT    1

Yes, wheel speed matters. But to get really nice designs I focus on tool angle.

 

gallery_10453_377_838240.jpg

 

 

Nice piece!

 

 

Joel, are the long swirly ridges in place before you started the chatter, or did they somehow develop as a result of repeated chattering?

 

I still love this pot so much.

 

Thanks,

Lily

 

 

 

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JLowes    28

I usually use chattering as an accent, or a place to put some color on a form. I have never gotten chattering close to what Joel achieved in his marvelous example, so I am curious as to how it was done as well. In fact, I have not gotten what Brian Reed has regularly either, so advise on which tool one is using for the chattering is also important.

 

The tool I use is one I made from a piece of steel strapping from a pallet. I have several configurations, including a straight cut across, one with a single vee point and one with two vee points, each one has a "handle" that is the strap folded a a little over 90 degrees to the point. I use the single vee point the most and play with wheel speed, how loosely I am holding the tool, where along the handle I hold the tool and where in leather hard the clay is for variation. I find that you can chatter fairly early, but waiting until the clay surface is quite firm works best for me. I sometimes help get it there with a heat gun I keep at my wheel.

 

I attached a couple examples of my pots with the accent chattering. The pattern on the red on white jar is what I get most of the time.

 

John

post-2045-134642637046_thumb.jpg

post-2045-134642663376_thumb.jpg

post-2045-134642637046_thumb.jpg

post-2045-134642663376_thumb.jpg

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Brian Reed    23

John,

 

Oh my goodness that lidded jar is beautiful. The form is perfect and color treatment fits it well.

 

 

 

To answer you question about tools you are right it makes all the difference. I use a hacksaw blade bent at 90 degrees and sharpened on the end like a knife. I have several ends that I like to use. I see you used a flat edge. That makes a nice texture, but is totally different from a pointed edge, a flattened point, but my favorite is the rounded edge. My biggest tip is to sharpen your tools each time you sit and trim, and use the frequency and sound more that visual to tell if you are getting the chattering right. It should be smooth and rhythmic.

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To answer you question about tools you are right it makes all the difference. I use a hacksaw blade bent at 90 degrees and sharpened on the end like a knife. I have several ends that I like to use. I see you used a flat edge. That makes a nice texture, but is totally different from a pointed edge, a flattened point, but my favorite is the rounded edge. My biggest tip is to sharpen your tools each time you sit and trim, and use the frequency and sound more that visual to tell if you are getting the chattering right. It should be smooth and rhythmic.

 

 

I use a hacksaw blade as well but I never thought to have different shaped cutting surfaces.

 

Thanks for the tip, Brian. B)

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yedrow    8

Lily,

 

That is just from one chattering.

 

John,

 

Just use the tool like a guitar string. I use any piece of flat thin metal. Banding straps make good tools. Here is a pic of the tool I used on the piece in the earlier pic.

 

chatteringtool.jpg

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docweathers    79

On YouTube I've seen some demonstrations of chattering on freshly thrown soft clay. It is still soft enough that they can expand the body of the pot to stretch the pattern. I've tried this with no luck. Any suggestions on how to get chattering to work on soft clay would be appreciated.

 

Larry

 

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Brian Reed    23

Old thread, I know, but I did recently make an instructional video on how I make my tools and use them. I am not great at making videos, but was asked to get this together for an article that I was asked to write.

 

 

 

Let me know what you think.

 

 

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Natania    6

I know this thread is about trying to get the chattering effect, but I had just decided to post a question about avoiding it, although when used intentionally the effect is quite stunning on the examples posted here. I know that trimming pots that are a bit too dry does it, but I am wondering if using dull tools add to this " problem?

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docweathers    79

Sometime ago I found these two YouTube videos of the guy doing great chattering on soft clay.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UNse35898A

 

 

When I could not make it work very well I wrote him. below I've inserted the essence of our email exchange.

 

 

The common wisdom is that you do chattering someplace beyond leather hard. Obviously, from your YouTube videos "Chattering Surface Texture Technique on Tall Forms - Potter's Wheel Demo" and "Chattering technique on flat form - pottery surface texture ". You make it work quite spectacularly with freshly thrown soft clay. I have tried to emulate your chattering of soft clay, with no luck.

 

What's the secret to making chattering work on soft clay.

 

---------

 

The "knobs" are:

 

1) Wheel speed

2) Pressure of spring metal on clay

3) Resistance of clay (how soft or hard)

4) Length of vibrating spring metal measured from point of contact with the clay to where it is held.

 

With he above variables, the frequency or wave length is set and the most difficult part is to start the vibration. Play with all variables until you feel slight vibration. When you sense the first tiny vibration, release the pressure a bit until the vibrations is amplified and the sound gets louder and louder.

 

 

---------

 

I think the key is in his last sentence. I still can't get it to work all the time but occasionally I have had some pretty good luck.

 

 

Larry

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