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Re-Glazing

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I've read a lot about reglazing over less than successful glazes done at cone 5 - using honey, heating the pot before applying the glaze...I've yet to have a reglaze that had any effect whatever. I'm wondering about applying a low fire glaze over cone 5-6 glazes and what to expect.

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Not sure why your re-glazing is not having the desired effect. I just put on more glaze without re-heating. I mix my own glazes. Maybe there is more clay content in them that makes them stick to the glazed surface. Try adding a little corn syrup to the glaze you are using to reglaze. Let that reglaze be thick. Try to get a visibly thicker coating on the reglazed area. To get the glaze thicker , let it dry out a little.leave it uncovered for a few days...depending on the humidity where you live.

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Not sure why your re-glazing is not having the desired effect. I just put on more glaze without re-heating. I mix my own glazes. Maybe there is more clay content in them that makes them stick to the glazed surface. Try adding a little corn syrup to the glaze you are using to reglaze. Let that reglaze be thick. Try to get a visibly thicker coating on the reglazed area. To get the glaze thicker , let it dry out a little.leave it uncovered for a few days...depending on the humidity where you live.

 

 

I've had very good results using a hot plate to heat the peice to be re-glazed with cone 6 glazes. Heat the piece to about 250 FH then re dip or spray. The only difficulty is cleaning the bottom after dipping again.

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Not sure why your re-glazing is not having the desired effect. I just put on more glaze without re-heating. I mix my own glazes. Maybe there is more clay content in them that makes them stick to the glazed surface. Try adding a little corn syrup to the glaze you are using to reglaze. Let that reglaze be thick. Try to get a visibly thicker coating on the reglazed area. To get the glaze thicker , let it dry out a little.leave it uncovered for a few days...depending on the humidity where you live.

 

 

I've had very good results using a hot plate to heat the peice to be re-glazed with cone 6 glazes. Heat the piece to about 250 FH then re dip or spray. The only difficulty is cleaning the bottom after dipping again.

 

Are you re-waxing the bottoms? That would make it easier if you are dipping.

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Not sure why your re-glazing is not having the desired effect. I just put on more glaze without re-heating. I mix my own glazes. Maybe there is more clay content in them that makes them stick to the glazed surface. Try adding a little corn syrup to the glaze you are using to reglaze. Let that reglaze be thick. Try to get a visibly thicker coating on the reglazed area. To get the glaze thicker , let it dry out a little.leave it uncovered for a few days...depending on the humidity where you live.

 

 

I've had very good results using a hot plate to heat the peice to be re-glazed with cone 6 glazes. Heat the piece to about 250 FH then re dip or spray. The only difficulty is cleaning the bottom after dipping again.

 

Are you re-waxing the bottoms? That would make it easier if you are dipping.

 

 

We have success at our community studio with this method, on pieces that have not been soaked in water, etc.:

 

1. Remove water from the top of a settled bucket of the desired glaze, set the water aside so you can add it back when you are done, mix up the now- thicker glaze in the bucket, and scoop up a cup of it.

2. Heat your piece in the microwave (along with a separate cup of water on the side) about 30 seconds at a time, until it's hot, but not too hot to pick up with your bare hands.

3. Now brush the thick glaze on. If the piece starts cooling off, or if you want to put more on, reheat it in the microwave.

4. Don't overdo it and don't forget to add the water back to the bucket.

 

If your piece is larger than a microwave, you need to find another way to heat it up!

If you have already used the piece, or if there is some way it has absorbed water, (even tho vitirified) forget it.

 

Treena Rinaldi

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Reglazing involves keeping the pot hot. Not used m'wave idea and personally don't recommend it because of stress reasons to pot. If you're not able to use a spray gun + paint stripper heat gun; then use brush on method (let glaze settle overnight and decant off water to make thicker for brushing) + paint-stripper heat gun. Place pot on turning wheel. Can wax base, but you'll be needing to hold/grab pot to wipe off droplets of glaze at some point. Why not use an even layer of upholstery sponge using industrial glue to bat (please let sponge + glue cure and dry overnight). Swipe/shimmy base of pot/foot ring on dampened sponge to remove glaze. Heat gun is a wonderful tool in the clay studio, and not only useful for reglazing. Use it as some potters use a "lazy flame" gas gun to dry the walls of a pot -- inside and out -- you're turning or throwing in segments. Easy peasey to set up a holder so as to free hands for turning. No studio should be without one.

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I've read a lot about reglazing over less than successful glazes done at cone 5 - using honey, heating the pot before applying the glaze...I've yet to have a reglaze that had any effect whatever. I'm wondering about applying a low fire glaze over cone 5-6 glazes and what to expect.

 

 

I have had past success reglazing some pieces by prepping the piece with a starch solution sprayed on. (About 30% liquid laundry starch to 70% water.) The starch seemed to help grab the new glaze layer. After the glaze dried, which can take quite a while due to lack of absorption in a fired piece, I lightly sprayed more starch on to harden the glaze coat. I imagine preheating the piece would help, also.

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I've read a lot about reglazing over less than successful glazes done at cone 5 - using honey, heating the pot before applying the glaze...I've yet to have a reglaze that had any effect whatever. I'm wondering about applying a low fire glaze over cone 5-6 glazes and what to expect.

 

 

 

Hi, With cone 6 or 7 refiring I have been wuite successful in brushing a layer of CMC over the ware, let is dry thoroughly and put 2 or more layers of the desired glaze or oxyde. Make sure it dries well between each layer of glaze.

Good glazing! Judith - autour de la terre - CH

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Guest Sherman

CMC is?

 

Carboxymethylcellulose. It's an organic gum that is often used to add raw strength to glazes both wet and dry. It helps wet glazes stay on the piece, and it hardens the dry glaze so it won't be chalky. It's available in powder form, and you should only mix up the amount you need, or it can go rancid and smell.

 

I've never tried a layer by itself to aid in adhering raw glaze to fired pot, but I'll certainly keep that in mind next time I try refiring something.

 

Sherman

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