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#1 potter232

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Posted 29 June 2010 - 04:32 PM

Please can someone tell me how to prepare clay to be used for flameproof cooking pots, and also the temperature at which to fire it? They are made in their millions in places like Spain and Morocco, and work very well, but no-one seems to know what makes them useable on top of the stove, when most pottery would crack. They are usually glazed inside, but not outside. I would be glad of some help please...

#2 Guest_LGHT_*

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 12:57 PM

Please can someone tell me how to prepare clay to be used for flameproof cooking pots, and also the temperature at which to fire it? They are made in their millions in places like Spain and Morocco, and work very well, but no-one seems to know what makes them useable on top of the stove, when most pottery would crack. They are usually glazed inside, but not outside. I would be glad of some help please...


I think your looking for Flameware clay. It's basically clay bodies that contain a high amount of petalite. Most large vendors sell flameware and I believe it's just fired to cone 10.

#3 potter232

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 05:18 PM


Please can someone tell me how to prepare clay to be used for flameproof cooking pots, and also the temperature at which to fire it? They are made in their millions in places like Spain and Morocco, and work very well, but no-one seems to know what makes them useable on top of the stove, when most pottery would crack. They are usually glazed inside, but not outside. I would be glad of some help please...


I think your looking for Flameware clay. It's basically clay bodies that contain a high amount of petalite. Most large vendors sell flameware and I believe it's just fired to cone 10.



Thank you very much for your reply. Unfortunately I live in UK and the suppliers don't seem to have such a thing as flameware. I do have petalite so maybe I could add some to ordinary clay and try it to see what happens ( if I can be brave enough!) Thanks again!

#4 Guest_LGHT_*

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 06:49 PM

I have never made my clay as I have 2 huge suppliers within driving distance, but here are a few you can try out.

Ron Propst's Flameware Formula Spodumene (200 mesh)30 Pyrophyllite (200 mesh)10 Feldspar (200 mesh)10 Ball clay (OM#4)20 A.P. Green Fireclay30 Western Bentonite2 Macaloid1

Here is a link to the full article




The craft and art of clay: a complete potter's handbook
By Susan Peterson, Jan Peterson

Also seems to have some info on making flameware: Here is a link to some info from the book.

CLICK HERE


Hope it helps.


#5 potter232

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 03:51 AM

I have never made my clay as I have 2 huge suppliers within driving distance, but here are a few you can try out.

Ron Propst's Flameware Formula Spodumene (200 mesh)30 Pyrophyllite (200 mesh)10 Feldspar (200 mesh)10 Ball clay (OM#4)20 A.P. Green Fireclay30 Western Bentonite2 Macaloid1

Here is a link to the full article




The craft and art of clay: a complete potter's handbook
By Susan Peterson, Jan Peterson

Also seems to have some info on making flameware: Here is a link to some info from the book.

CLICK HERE


Hope it helps.


You are very kind! Thank you for the very useful information - I will have to try now I have the recipes. I am glad I liked chemistry at school (a long time ago!) so it should be really interesting - as is everything with clay! I am just an amateur potter, but enjoy it very much. Thank you yet again for taking the time and trouble to help.

#6 karstyl

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 09:30 AM

The other way to go is with low fire, high grog and high temper (organic material) earthenware. This is how it has been achieved for thousands of years.

It might be hard to glaze the pot as you would have to find a glaze that fits the body, but if you burnish it before you fire, and then oil it and season it in the oven like cast iron, it is not porous.

It is not possible to heat such a pot quickly without cracking, but I have used a gentle flame from my stove to make nice stews and the like.

#7 potter232

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 09:48 AM

The other way to go is with low fire, high grog and high temper (organic material) earthenware. This is how it has been achieved for thousands of years.

It might be hard to glaze the pot as you would have to find a glaze that fits the body, but if you burnish it before you fire, and then oil it and season it in the oven like cast iron, it is not porous.

It is not possible to heat such a pot quickly without cracking, but I have used a gentle flame from my stove to make nice stews and the like.



Dear Karstyl,

This sounds like the Spanish cooking pot that I have already. I was told to soak it in water before using on a gentle heat. It is glazed (on the inside only), but as you say, these people have been making this pottery for thousands of years, and would no doubt have tested quite a few glazes to get the right one. Your suggestion to burnish before firing, then oil and season it in the oven sounds a good one. Many thanks for your help.

#8 Sherman

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 10:22 AM

potter232,
Here is an article by Robbie Lobell about flameware that was originally published in the December 2008 issue of Ceramics Monthly. I've attached an image of her wonderful work as well. Lobell has been making flameware for many years, and she includes her clay and glaze recipes in the article. One thing to keep in mind is that glaze recipes need to be matched to the flameware body, since the thermal properties of expansion and contraction are lower for flameware than for a "regular" clay body. Special clay requires special glazes.
There also are issues regarding litigation if the ware fails and injures someone, which is why there are not many individuals selling flameware---just something to keep in mind.
Happy testing!
Sherman

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Sherman Hall
Editor, Ceramics Monthly
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http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org

#9 potter232

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Posted 01 July 2010 - 11:40 AM

potter232,
Here is an article by Robbie Lobell about flameware that was originally published in the December 2008 issue of Ceramics Monthly. I've attached an image of her wonderful work as well. Lobell has been making flameware for many years, and she includes her clay and glaze recipes in the article. One thing to keep in mind is that glaze recipes need to be matched to the flameware body, since the thermal properties of expansion and contraction are lower for flameware than for a "regular" clay body. Special clay requires special glazes.
There also are issues regarding litigation if the ware fails and injures someone, which is why there are not many individuals selling flameware---just something to keep in mind.
Happy testing!
Sherman



Dear Sherman,

Many thanks for your reply to my question. The article by Robbie Lobell is really good and very practical, especially as she includes recipes for both the clay body and the glazes. I can see I am going to be busy for a while! I will have to pluck up the courage to use my propane-fired kiln, bought second-hand and not yet used as the electric kiln is less scary! I once felt like that about the electric kiln, but soon got used to firing it. Hopefully it will be the same with the gas-fired kiln. It is good to know about the safety aspect of the dishes, too. For now they will be for my own use only, but still need to be safe.

Thank you again for your help - it is much appreciated.




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