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Nelly

Wax drip removal

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Dear All,

 

Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, I recall a way to remove wax drips using a solution.

 

I know you can remove the white pour and paint wax by:

 

1. Microwave

2. Rebisque heating

3. Refiring after glaze applied

 

But...somewhere in my mind I am thinking that I read somewhere you can remove unwanted drips with something else:

 

? rubbing alcohol

? peroxide

? javex

 

I am just not sure what I read or where it came from?? Does anyone have any ideas of a solution I can use to get rid of these unwanted glaze drips that I can see in the middle of bowl? Seems like some sort of cutting-type agent to the wax would be easiest for me. In short, I just want to wipe it off and be able to glaze over it.

 

BTW-do you notice I write using lists of things...it must be the teacher in me.

 

Nelly

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Dear All,

 

Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, I recall a way to remove wax drips using a solution.

 

I know you can remove the white pour and paint wax by:

 

1. Microwave

2. Rebisque heating

3. Refiring after glaze applied

4 -small hand torch-will burn it off and can crack piece as well

You do not have to re bisque only heat till wax burns off-This is around 200-350 degrees

But...somewhere in my mind I am thinking that I read somewhere you can remove unwanted drips with something else:

 

? -this works on your hands better than on clay to remove-rubbing alcohol

? peroxide

? javex

 

I am just not sure what I read or where it came from?? Does anyone have any ideas of a solution I can use to get rid of these unwanted glaze drips that I can see in the middle of bowl? Seems like some sort of cutting-type agent to the wax would be easiest for me. In short, I just want to wipe it off and be able to glaze over it.

 

BTW-do you notice I write using lists of things...it must be the teacher in me.

 

Nelly

 

What we do on glaze day if we spill or drip some is

I keep a wet sponge at the ready as this gets most of it when its still wet

second I sand it off with sand paper then rub it hard and well with broken bisque ware to imbed bisque dust where way was

Then glaze piece and see if it still resists. If it does I rub it out again with broken bisque ware and touch up with glaze

Mark

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Dear All,

 

Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, I recall a way to remove wax drips using a solution.

 

I know you can remove the white pour and paint wax by:

 

1. Microwave

2. Rebisque heating

3. Refiring after glaze applied

4 -small hand torch-will burn it off and can crack piece as well

You do not have to re bisque only heat till wax burns off-This is around 200-350 degrees

But...somewhere in my mind I am thinking that I read somewhere you can remove unwanted drips with something else:

 

? -this works on your hands better than on clay to remove-rubbing alcohol

? peroxide

? javex

 

I am just not sure what I read or where it came from?? Does anyone have any ideas of a solution I can use to get rid of these unwanted glaze drips that I can see in the middle of bowl? Seems like some sort of cutting-type agent to the wax would be easiest for me. In short, I just want to wipe it off and be able to glaze over it.

 

BTW-do you notice I write using lists of things...it must be the teacher in me.

 

Nelly

 

What we do on glaze day if we spill or drip some is

I keep a wet sponge at the ready as this gets most of it when its still wet

second I sand it off with sand paper then rub it hard and well with broken bisque ware to imbed bisque dust where way was

Then glaze piece and see if it still resists. If it does I rub it out again with broken bisque ware and touch up with glaze

Mark

 

 

Hey Mark,

 

That's a good idea. Sanding. I never thought of that?? I am sure the bique ware filing creates a type of grip for the glaze. Will give it a go. Thank you.

 

Nelly

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For small spots, lighter fluid (naphtha) works well.

 

 

Dear Matt,

 

That's it. Lighter fluid. Can't for the life of me remember where I read this but that is the solvent.

 

I will give that a go as well.

 

When I spoke to Tuckers today they said "nothing but bisqueing" again will do get rid of drips. But I will give it a go with this fluid (i.e., if I can find some lying around this old house).

 

Thank you all for helping me again. It is not a big spot but it is on the inside of a bowl.

 

Thank you.

 

Nelly

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I take a pocket knife and scrape off the wax, then run it down a little further with sand paper. It gets it off just fine. You have to get the angle of the blade on the knife just right though. This takes about a minute to do for a moderate sized splash of wax. It of course doesn't work well/at all on concavities, in which case you have to re-fire (or if it's a mug, just toss it and make another).

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I use a paint stripper heat gun to burn off the wax. Usually takes less than a minute with the 1000 degrees heat.

 

Aloha, ken

 

 

Dear Ken,

 

Yeah, I was thinking about that too. Is paint stripper the same as lighter fluid?? I still have to find the lighter fluid and I think I threw out my paint stripper. My guess is that you put water in between the coats to prevent fire??

 

At this point I will do all the above suggestions and if worse comes to worse put it on a fast glaze cycle in my kiln to heat it up quickly. I don't have a heat gun. I must get one of these. This would make a great topic also--the pro's and con's of heat guns versus the torch.

 

Thank you for your thoughts. Seems like a really quick and easy approach to drips as well.

 

Nelly

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I use a paint stripper heat gun to burn off the wax. Usually takes less than a minute with the 1000 degrees heat.

 

Aloha, ken

 

 

Be careful using methods that involve heat because the uneven heating can cause cracking, especially in smooth clay bodies like porcelain.

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Nelly

My line 4 in your original text that I edited says

4 -small hand torch-will burn it off and can crack piece as well

You may have a small propane torch -just be careful about uneven heating which will crack a piece-

I like the light fluid idea-paint strippers are very nasty.

Mark

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Dear All,

 

Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, I recall a way to remove wax drips using a solution.

 

I know you can remove the white pour and paint wax by:

 

1. Microwave

2. Rebisque heating

3. Refiring after glaze applied

 

But...somewhere in my mind I am thinking that I read somewhere you can remove unwanted drips with something else:

 

? rubbing alcohol

? peroxide

? javex

 

I am just not sure what I read or where it came from?? Does anyone have any ideas of a solution I can use to get rid of these unwanted glaze drips that I can see in the middle of bowl? Seems like some sort of cutting-type agent to the wax would be easiest for me. In short, I just want to wipe it off and be able to glaze over it.

 

BTW-do you notice I write using lists of things...it must be the teacher in me.

 

Nelly

 

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Nelly

My line 4 in your original text that I edited says

4 -small hand torch-will burn it off and can crack piece as well

You may have a small propane torch -just be careful about uneven heating which will crack a piece-

I like the light fluid idea-paint strippers are very nasty.

Mark

 

 

Dear Mark,

 

While I have never worked with a propane torch or a heat gun, I am sure you are right in terms of cracking. I too made an error in my writing. I meant to say "paint thinner" or the stuff used to clean out brushes.

 

Nelly

 

Nelly

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I keep a bottle of nail polish remover in my studio for just such an occassion. Works perfectly !!

 

That would be Acetone...good idea. I usually re-heat in my test kiln.

Marcia

 

 

 

 

 

Also handy if you super glue your fingers together.

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I use a paint stripper heat gun to burn off the wax. Usually takes less than a minute with the 1000 degrees heat.

 

Aloha, ken

 

 

Be careful using methods that involve heat because the uneven heating can cause cracking, especially in smooth clay bodies like porcelain.

 

 

True dat. I hate using direct heat to remove wax since the wax will seep in more deeply unless it is vaporized. The clay also tends to absorbe and disperse a lot of the directed heat. Either it takes forever or you risk breaking the piece.

 

Just scraping away the layer of clay that the wax is attached to, then sanding it even, works fine. I used to do it all the time and have done it on hundreds of pieces. I've never seen a negative effect.

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I use a paint stripper heat gun to burn off the wax. Usually takes less than a minute with the 1000 degrees heat.

 

Aloha, ken

 

 

Be careful using methods that involve heat because the uneven heating can cause cracking, especially in smooth clay bodies like porcelain.

 

 

True dat. I hate using direct heat to remove wax since the wax will seep in more deeply unless it is vaporized. The clay also tends to absorbe and disperse a lot of the directed heat. Either it takes forever or you risk breaking the piece.

 

Just scraping away the layer of clay that the wax is attached to, then sanding it even, works fine. I used to do it all the time and have done it on hundreds of pieces. I've never seen a negative effect.

 

When using the heat gun fan it back and forth over the wax area until it burns off. Works every time, never cracked a piece even on a smooth clay body.

 

Aloha, ken

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When using the heat gun fan it back and forth over the wax area until it burns off. Works every time, never cracked a piece even on a smooth clay body.

 

Aloha, ken

 

 

I've never used a heat gun, but I've used a torch and it causes a carbon residue at best. These days I don't get wax on the bisque. Hmm, I can't actually remember when I last got wax on a pot. I have a heat gun at home, I'll give it a try on a mug sometime.

 

Joel.

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