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Marcia Selsor

Nan bread oven

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

post-1954-134132692947_thumb.jpghere is a Nan bread over in use. It is a simple teardrop shaped pot with a fire in the bottom that heats up the walls.

I was treated to this bread after a night train from Tashkent to Bukhara. Several of us stayed at my friend's house there. We arrived about 6 am. His mother was baking the bread in the courtyard as we arrived to the house. The bread drops off when it is cooked. She made a big stack for us. It was delicious.

 

post-1954-134132681645_thumb.jpg

 

post-1954-134132681645_thumb.jpg

post-1954-134132692947_thumb.jpg

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I did watch the process but it was back in 1994 and after riding the night train. I can't remember if she used a tool to pull out the bread to not. I would think some tongs would be better than a bare hand. Obviously it is hot enough to bake bread. It is a very simple oven...and the speed would be similar to a good Italian pizza oven ..about 3 minutes.

She had a stack of no less than 20 of these for about 7 guests and 5 family members.

Marcia

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~janie    8

What did the bread taste like? Is it crusty, or soft, like tortillas? I would like to know how to make one of these ovens.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

It is Nan as you eat in Indian restaurants. There are tools with pins to poke the center before baking to avoid doughy texture. It is flat bread. Thicker than a tortilla.

Nice crust on the edge and somewhat in the center.

 

Marcia

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DAY    8

It is Nan as you eat in Indian restaurants. There are tools with pins to poke the center before baking to avoid doughy texture. It is flat bread. Thicker than a tortilla.

Nice crust on the edge and somewhat in the center.

 

Marcia

 

Many years ago I baked a pizza atop an electric kiln. Used a few stilts and a shelf to make a top to hold in heat.

Has anyone used that "excess" heat to cook? I bet a stew pot could work some magic over a 10 hour firing. . .

 

 

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Frederik-W    23

It would be interesting to know how people would see this in different settings,

e.g. 100% purely functional or art if it is put in in e.g. a sculptural garden.

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