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Nan bread oven


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#1 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 09:49 AM

Attached File  UzbekBukharabreadoven2.jpg   27.17KB   79 downloadshere is a Nan bread over in use. It is a simple teardrop shaped pot with a fire in the bottom that heats up the walls.
I was treated to this bread after a night train from Tashkent to Bukhara. Several of us stayed at my friend's house there. We arrived about 6 am. His mother was baking the bread in the courtyard as we arrived to the house. The bread drops off when it is cooked. She made a big stack for us. It was delicious.

Attached File  Uzbekbreadovn.jpg   24.94KB   74 downloads


#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 10:36 AM

Did you watch the process? I'm assuming she sticks her hand inside each time she has to put one in or out ... so how hot is the oven?

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#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 11:49 AM

I did watch the process but it was back in 1994 and after riding the night train. I can't remember if she used a tool to pull out the bread to not. I would think some tongs would be better than a bare hand. Obviously it is hot enough to bake bread. It is a very simple oven...and the speed would be similar to a good Italian pizza oven ..about 3 minutes.
She had a stack of no less than 20 of these for about 7 guests and 5 family members.
Marcia

#4 ~janie

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 12:29 PM

What did the bread taste like? Is it crusty, or soft, like tortillas? I would like to know how to make one of these ovens.

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 12:43 PM

It is Nan as you eat in Indian restaurants. There are tools with pins to poke the center before baking to avoid doughy texture. It is flat bread. Thicker than a tortilla.
Nice crust on the edge and somewhat in the center.

Marcia

#6 DAY

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 07:04 PM

It is Nan as you eat in Indian restaurants. There are tools with pins to poke the center before baking to avoid doughy texture. It is flat bread. Thicker than a tortilla.
Nice crust on the edge and somewhat in the center.

Marcia

Many years ago I baked a pizza atop an electric kiln. Used a few stilts and a shelf to make a top to hold in heat.
Has anyone used that "excess" heat to cook? I bet a stew pot could work some magic over a 10 hour firing. . .



#7 Frederik-W

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 11:35 AM

It would be interesting to know how people would see this in different settings,
e.g. 100% purely functional or art if it is put in in e.g. a sculptural garden.





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