Jump to content


Photo

historical design:consider this one


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 29 June 2012 - 12:15 PM

This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads

#2 AmeriSwede

AmeriSwede

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • LocationFörslöv, Sweden

Posted 29 June 2012 - 01:17 PM

This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


First thing that comes to my mind..... I like this setup Posted Image more than anything that Weber® offers... hands down!


------Rick



Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it. (Fernand Leger
)

#3 Nelly

Nelly

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 379 posts

Posted 29 June 2012 - 03:43 PM


This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


First thing that comes to my mind..... I like this setup Posted Image more than anything that Weber® offers... hands down!


Rick,

I think you make a good analogy. It does seem to have all the things needed for a great cooking stove. I remember a number of years ago many people were busy buying those outdoor fire pits for the backyard. I forget the name of this store. A chimonea or something like that. It seemed like every backyard had one. I can't imagine the weight in hauling one of these home for a contained fire but many people did. To me, this is one great set-up done for cooking in a time past. I wonder if it was actually used for the purpose it appears to be intended for or if it was similar to this backyard fire chimonea that everyone purchased a while back. Interesting piece.

Nelly

#4 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:10 PM

This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


A very interesting piece I would have liked to have seen it 'in situ'. It has an efficient use of fire.
I had no idea this forum was just for 'contemporary ceramics'. I didn't pay attention to the sub-heading. Didn't mean to over step the bounds.

John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#5 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 29 June 2012 - 07:06 PM

Lucille,
I think aesthetics can be applied to contemporary through reflecting on historical pieces. I really liked your posts on "What is it". I only noticed the description on the "Aesthetics" following with the description.
Marcia

#6 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,259 posts

Posted 29 June 2012 - 07:58 PM

Contemporary is relative; considering the age of ceramics and humanity -- this could easily be considered quite contemporary.

#7 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 29 June 2012 - 09:22 PM

This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


So very interesting! Do you have more info and bigger pics of the stove?

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#8 Frederik-W

Frederik-W

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 291 posts
  • Locationa distant moon of Uranus

Posted 30 June 2012 - 12:23 AM

Thanks for that.
I think a lot of pottery from the past is far more beautiful than some of the pretentious ceramics objects of today.


#9 AmeriSwede

AmeriSwede

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • LocationFörslöv, Sweden

Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:27 PM



This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


First thing that comes to my mind..... I like this setup Posted Image more than anything that Weber® offers... hands down!


Rick,

I think you make a good analogy. It does seem to have all the things needed for a great cooking stove. I remember a number of years ago many people were busy buying those outdoor fire pits for the backyard. I forget the name of this store. A chimonea or something like that. It seemed like every backyard had one. I can't imagine the weight in hauling one of these home for a contained fire but many people did. To me, this is one great set-up done for cooking in a time past. I wonder if it was actually used for the purpose it appears to be intended for or if it was similar to this backyard fire chimonea that everyone purchased a while back. Interesting piece.

Nelly



Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image I remember years back when those chimonea seemed to be the 'pet rock' item of the backyard.... and I laugh again as it now seems that little quirk has now made its way to Sweden as I'm beginning to see them more frequently around and in stores.

My only hope is that that grill contraption was indeed used for the intended purpose as it seems so diverse in its cooking range and ability to do so much at once, full meal (4 course) cooking . More so than that chimonea which never seemed to be much more than an open fireplace on the deck.... Posted Imagehttp://ceramicartsda...ult/biggrin.gif for those that still had room on the deck after setting up their hot tub / jacuzzi.


------Rick



Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it. (Fernand Leger
)

#10 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:52 PM


This is from 6th century BCE on the island of Delos. I realize this is suppose to be a topical discussion of contemporary ceramics, but I think reflecting on the past can develop a healthy knowledge for aesthetics. Marcia

Attached File  small.jpg   38.66KB   94 downloads


So very interesting! Do you have more info and bigger pics of the stove?

Jim

I thought posting here had to be 48 k or less.
Marcia



#11 AmeriSwede

AmeriSwede

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 142 posts
  • LocationFörslöv, Sweden

Posted 01 July 2012 - 01:14 PM

I thought posting here had to be 48 k or less.
Marcia




Judging from some of the 'full wall size high definition' (at least 10x bigger than my laptop monitor) pics that some post, I'm led to believe otherwise....Posted ImagePosted Image




------Rick



Above all, it is a matter of loving art, not understanding it. (Fernand Leger
)

#12 DBCurley

DBCurley

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 01 July 2012 - 01:27 PM

That stove is beautiful!
My gallery. please visit!

"A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet,balance accounts,build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying,take orders,giveorders,cooperate,act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." — Robert Heinlein

'....and throw a mug!' -- Brandon Curley

#13 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,960 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 01 July 2012 - 08:48 PM

Marcia - Would those pots have been thrown on a foot or hand operated wheel or were they hand built ... do you know? They are lovely.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#14 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:07 AM

I would assume the Greeks were using wheels by this time.
Marcia




#15 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,960 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 02 July 2012 - 09:30 AM

In this ancient vein, does anyone mind if I add one of my favorites from 4,000 BCE Eastern Europe?

What I love about this one is that even though it is a functional pot, the surface is decorated. More is always wonderful!!

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#16 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,543 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 02 July 2012 - 10:01 AM

I love the woman on the upper part.
Marcia

#17 Lucille Oka

Lucille Oka

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 02 July 2012 - 04:15 PM

One of the best things about ancient utilitarian pieces is they can be read. This vessel looks like a water carrier. Why? It is large with a rounded bottom to be carried on the head. It has texture to help grip and a narrowing spout for pouring. I love it!
John 3:16
"For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life".

#18 Idaho Potter

Idaho Potter

    Learning all the time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • LocationBoise, Idaho

Posted 02 July 2012 - 04:39 PM

Please, keep offering up What Is It (s) and other discussion pieces. The latest by Chris is fabulous, and I want one of those thingys that Marcia posted. No more having to run between patio and kitchen to check for boilovers or burnt offerings--I could do it all in the same place!

I don't spend much time Googling for pottery, so miss out on a lot of good stuff. Lucille has kept me interested (even if sometimes confused) with her offerings. And the discussions from all of you more versed than I have me searching for other examples.

Please, please, please, my education is not complete and I need all the help I can get. Keep 'em coming!

Shirley

#19 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,960 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 02 July 2012 - 08:28 PM

Thanks for the insight Lucille ... All the cards were in German, a language I can't even fake read!
We stumbled on this museum one afternoon and it had one whole floor of ancient pottery from digs across Eastern Europe. I will post more images as it is quite amazing to note some of the forms look very contemporary.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users