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medoll

High School Ceramic Teacher

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Pres, Benzine, Natania, et al;

Are you are aware that there have been over 80,000 views of this post.A great conversation, all of you!

Looks like we have some common concerns.

TJR.

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Pres, Benzine, Natania, et al;

Are you are aware that there have been over 80,000 views of this post.A great conversation, all of you!

Looks like we have some common concerns.

TJR.

 

 

 

And who said no one cares about art education?

P.S. my first art teaching job was In a windowless basement room that was so damp that nothing dried unless placed near a firing kiln. Why are we always in basements or attics? Now I teach a class in the basement, and one at the top of the building on the third floor (in the attic), and this is similar to another school where I taught a class (cerx) in the basement and then a drawing class in a studio on the 5th floor! I certainly do get my exercise! Not good if you forget to grab something after climbing up three flights of stairs though.

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Pres, Benzine, Natania, et al;

Are you are aware that there have been over 80,000 views of this post.A great conversation, all of you!

Looks like we have some common concerns.

TJR.

 

 

 

And who said no one cares about art education?

P.S. my first art teaching job was In a windowless basement room that was so damp that nothing dried unless placed near a firing kiln. Why are we always in basements or attics? Now I teach a class in the basement, and one at the top of the building on the third floor (in the attic), and this is similar to another school where I taught a class (cerx) in the basement and then a drawing class in a studio on the 5th floor! I certainly do get my exercise! Not good if you forget to grab something after climbing up three flights of stairs though.

 

 

 

They put us in attics and basements, to keep us separated from the normal folk, lest our crazy ideas infect them. Sad thing is, most the art rooms I've seen, are never on the main floor. So if a ceramics course i offered, that clay has to be lugged up or down stairs. My ceramics room at my first school was on the top floor. We ordered a couple tons of clay each year, and had no freight elevator. One year, the clay order was late, so we didn't get it until after students had arrived. So we had some free labor, in moving the clay. It was funny to see the "Tough Guys" grabbing two boxes at a time, despite my warning on the weight. I felt bad for the custodial staff, who were responsible for moving the clay, when it arrived before the school year started. At least at my second school, the studio, was not only on the ground level, but had a big garage door, and the clay could just be moved on the palette.

 

Sometimes being "segregated" from the rest of the school isn't a bad thing. You kind of get to do your own thing.

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Pres, Benzine, Natania, et al;

Are you are aware that there have been over 80,000 views of this post.A great conversation, all of you!

Looks like we have some common concerns.

TJR.

 

 

 

And who said no one cares about art education?

P.S. my first art teaching job was In a windowless basement room that was so damp that nothing dried unless placed near a firing kiln. Why are we always in basements or attics? Now I teach a class in the basement, and one at the top of the building on the third floor (in the attic), and this is similar to another school where I taught a class (cerx) in the basement and then a drawing class in a studio on the 5th floor! I certainly do get my exercise! Not good if you forget to grab something after climbing up three flights of stairs though.

 

 

 

They put us in attics and basements, to keep us separated from the normal folk, lest our crazy ideas infect them. Sad thing is, most the art rooms I've seen, are never on the main floor. So if a ceramics course i offered, that clay has to be lugged up or down stairs. My ceramics room at my first school was on the top floor. We ordered a couple tons of clay each year, and had no freight elevator. One year, the clay order was late, so we didn't get it until after students had arrived. So we had some free labor, in moving the clay. It was funny to see the "Tough Guys" grabbing two boxes at a time, despite my warning on the weight. I felt bad for the custodial staff, who were responsible for moving the clay, when it arrived before the school year started. At least at my second school, the studio, was not only on the ground level, but had a big garage door, and the clay could just be moved on the palette.

 

Sometimes being "segregated" from the rest of the school isn't a bad thing. You kind of get to do your own thing.

 

 

I liked being in my basement. I could play my music louder, I could yell if I wanted to, especially about a pot that really turned out neat, I could have kids wedging on the floor in the hall on boards of course, I even would have my student in a wheel chair roll out slabs using his chair in the hall! At the same time the School board meeting room was down the hall and around the corner from me. When they came down the stairs they went by my room, with my portable bulletin boards out, my display stands, and pottery sitting for them to see before board meetings. Hooray basements!

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The Superintendent's office, along with the rest of the district's Central Office, were on the main floor, of the old building, where my first room was. This was handy, if I needed to get anything to Central Office. However, despite its close proximity, the Superintendent, never once stepped foot in my room.

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Benzine;

I was at the bar last night. Not my usual haunt, but I was with an English teacher from my current school, and the guy who replaced me as the art teacher at my last high school. The English teacher said;"Hey, that's our new superintendent, having a beer. " He said;"I'm going over to introduce myself."

We both went over to talk to him. Turns out he lives in our neighbourhood, on the next street over from me. He seemed really approachable.Maybe things are looking up!

TJR.

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That's good TJR. I've never really got to know my Superintendents well. My current one, actually has an optional meetings at the various buildings each month. Just a way to inform everyone what's going on, and accept feedback. I like that he does that.

 

Now Principals, those are the administrators, that you want to be good, as you deal with them the most. Of the three schools I've been at, I've had three good Principals, and one bad one. In the mean time, two of the good ones, have gone on to become Superintendents at other districts. My current, good, Principal is working on his doctorate, so I'm worried, he'll move on. And the bad Principal, is still at his position at one of my former schools.

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Benzine;

This is who you need to know in this order-and I don't mean know, I mean be friends with;

1. The custodian for your area, and probably the head custodian

2.The secretaries.

3.One administrator who can get the job done, as in discipline

4.Your principal

The Superintendent is probably 10 or lower in importance to you directly, as they are so busy that you never see them-unless you are in trouble.:lol:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif">

Tom

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Benzine;

This is who you need to know in this order-and I don't mean know, I mean be friends with;

1. The custodian for your area, and probably the head custodian

2.The secretaries.

3.One administrator who can get the job done, as in discipline

4.Your principal

The Superintendent is probably 10 or lower in importance to you directly, as they are so busy that you never see them-unless you are in trouble.:lol:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif">

Tom

 

 

Hmmm I agree with all of those folks on the list. However, it helps to do a few other things. I was president of our high school faculty for several years and would deal with the superintendent across the table on issues of interest to the faculty-one putting in zerox copiers when we still used mimeograph. I also served on many committees with directors for curriculum planning, middle state evaluations, and other district committees. These things would get my face known among many. I became friends with the director for federal programs, and he helped me write grants for the animation classes=one biggie got approved. I also got assistance from him when it came to adding air collection systems to the ceramics room. The head of purchasing also was important when getting new brooms that would handle the dirt-not dust in the room

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Benzine;

This is who you need to know in this order-and I don't mean know, I mean be friends with;

1. The custodian for your area, and probably the head custodian

2.The secretaries.

3.One administrator who can get the job done, as in discipline

4.Your principal

The Superintendent is probably 10 or lower in importance to you directly, as they are so busy that you never see them-unless you are in trouble.:lol:src="http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/public/style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif">

Tom

 

 

My list would look almost exactly like yours'. In fact I tell students that all the time. "Here are the people, you want to befriend, or at least not upset."

In the past, I got on the good side of the custodial staff, because not only did my classes make a bigger mess, but because, they would also help me with any maintenance items I needed. At my current school, sadly only the former is true. They really cut back on custodial staff, so I rarely see them, and most of them can't deal with equipment issues anyway. I have a leaking darkroom faucet, that has been leaking since last year. The custodians I see, forward the information on, but I'm still waiting. I said, "Buy me the hardware, and I'll do it".

Anyway, I agree with the custodial staff, being that high on the list.

 

Secretaries, definitely want to be on their good side as well. I'm not going to lie, I don't always get attendance done right away, but since they like me, they don't call up screaming, on the odd occasion, I forget to send it in.

 

I will add one to your list TJR. The Technology Coordinator/ Tech Guy/ Techie. These days, with as much technology as we are cramming in our classroom, you want to keep this person happy. Being friendly with my tech guy, got me two digital projectors in the last year (the first one, and an upgraded model with HDMI, for the Apple TV input). I also got a second flat screen computer monitor out of the deal, which I have set up as an expanded screen.

So I'd put this person third or fourth on the list. Because of the modern school's emphasis, and dependence on technology, having this person against you, would be a bigger problem, than many others on the list.

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Benzine;

This is who you need to know in this order-and I don't mean know, I mean be friends with;

1. The custodian for your area, and probably the head custodian

2.The secretaries.

3.One administrator who can get the job done, as in discipline

4.Your principal

The Superintendent is probably 10 or lower in importance to you directly, as they are so busy that you never see them-unless you are in trouble.:lol:src="http://ceramicartsda...fault/laugh.gif">

Tom

 

 

My list would look almost exactly like yours'. In fact I tell students that all the time. "Here are the people, you want to befriend, or at least not upset."

In the past, I got on the good side of the custodial staff, because not only did my classes make a bigger mess, but because, they would also help me with any maintenance items I needed. At my current school, sadly only the former is true. They really cut back on custodial staff, so I rarely see them, and most of them can't deal with equipment issues anyway. I have a leaking darkroom faucet, that has been leaking since last year. The custodians I see, forward the information on, but I'm still waiting. I said, "Buy me the hardware, and I'll do it".

Anyway, I agree with the custodial staff, being that high on the list.

 

Secretaries, definitely want to be on their good side as well. I'm not going to lie, I don't always get attendance done right away, but since they like me, they don't call up screaming, on the odd occasion, I forget to send it in.

 

I will add one to your list TJR. The Technology Coordinator/ Tech Guy/ Techie. These days, with as much technology as we are cramming in our classroom, you want to keep this person happy. Being friendly with my tech guy, got me two digital projectors in the last year (the first one, and an upgraded model with HDMI, for the Apple TV input). I also got a second flat screen computer monitor out of the deal, which I have set up as an expanded screen.

So I'd put this person third or fourth on the list. Because of the modern school's emphasis, and dependence on technology, having this person against you, would be a bigger problem, than many others on the list.

 

 

The purchasing agent also got me two downdraft tables. I told him originally that with the air cleaner in the room that I thought the air was pretty good. He insisted, I rarely used them for air handling/cleaning, but found that they would dry almost any pot evenly in 30 minutes. This often allowed quick firings of week long summer camp projects. Thing is they sound like turbo jet aircraft when they crank up, as the fan is about 4 feet across.

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No one really helps me, when it comes to ordering. I get exactly what I ask for, no more, no less. I'm not complaining mind you. My Principal told me, when I interviewed for the job, if I can justify a item request, he wouldn't turn it down.

Beyond that, the Principal let me purchase four new 35mm cameras, when Guidance filled my class beyond, what I told them I could handle. And because it was their fault, not mine, the cameras did not come out of my department fund.

Meanwhile, the Middle School teacher has to fight for every item he gets.

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No one really helps me, when it comes to ordering. I get exactly what I ask for, no more, no less. I'm not complaining mind you. My Principal told me, when I interviewed for the job, if I can justify a item request, he wouldn't turn it down.

Beyond that, the Principal let me purchase four new 35mm cameras, when Guidance filled my class beyond, what I told them I could handle. And because it was their fault, not mine, the cameras did not come out of my department fund.

Meanwhile, the Middle School teacher has to fight for every item he gets.

 

 

Isn't that something new-a smart, trusting administrator! I would never want to lose that trust. Keep up the good work!

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No one really helps me, when it comes to ordering. I get exactly what I ask for, no more, no less. I'm not complaining mind you. My Principal told me, when I interviewed for the job, if I can justify a item request, he wouldn't turn it down.

Beyond that, the Principal let me purchase four new 35mm cameras, when Guidance filled my class beyond, what I told them I could handle. And because it was their fault, not mine, the cameras did not come out of my department fund.

Meanwhile, the Middle School teacher has to fight for every item he gets.

 

 

Isn't that something new-a smart, trusting administrator! I would never want to lose that trust. Keep up the good work!

 

 

 

He came in to observe me, last year. He really liked that I stated the goal for the day, so the students knew, what they were working toward. That's one of his big things, and he continues to remind staff to do so.

 

He was also very impressed with the Raku firing I did with my Art Club. He couldn't believe that a kiln I built at home, with some everyday objects, could work so well.

 

As I have mentioned before, I do worry that he might be looking for a Superintendent job in the near future. I hope I'm wrong.

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No one really helps me, when it comes to ordering. I get exactly what I ask for, no more, no less. I'm not complaining mind you. My Principal told me, when I interviewed for the job, if I can justify a item request, he wouldn't turn it down.

Beyond that, the Principal let me purchase four new 35mm cameras, when Guidance filled my class beyond, what I told them I could handle. And because it was their fault, not mine, the cameras did not come out of my department fund.

Meanwhile, the Middle School teacher has to fight for every item he gets.

 

 

Isn't that something new-a smart, trusting administrator! I would never want to lose that trust. Keep up the good work!

 

 

 

He came in to observe me, last year. He really liked that I stated the goal for the day, so the students knew, what they were working toward. That's one of his big things, and he continues to remind staff to do so.

 

He was also very impressed with the Raku firing I did with my Art Club. He couldn't believe that a kiln I built at home, with some everyday objects, could work so well.

 

As I have mentioned before, I do worry that he might be looking for a Superintendent job in the near future. I hope I'm wrong.

 

 

When you get a good administrator, it is really hard to give them up to a new job. You can only hope that if that happens he upfronts the guy coming in. I have had this happen to me, and it has been a big surprise. The curriculum coordinator that was leaving, talked up the program to the assistant superintendent that was taking over her job. It helped. Not completely, but some. Everyone has to make up their own mind as to the relevancy of something.

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No one really helps me, when it comes to ordering. I get exactly what I ask for, no more, no less. I'm not complaining mind you. My Principal told me, when I interviewed for the job, if I can justify a item request, he wouldn't turn it down.

Beyond that, the Principal let me purchase four new 35mm cameras, when Guidance filled my class beyond, what I told them I could handle. And because it was their fault, not mine, the cameras did not come out of my department fund.

Meanwhile, the Middle School teacher has to fight for every item he gets.

 

 

Isn't that something new-a smart, trusting administrator! I would never want to lose that trust. Keep up the good work!

 

 

 

He came in to observe me, last year. He really liked that I stated the goal for the day, so the students knew, what they were working toward. That's one of his big things, and he continues to remind staff to do so.

 

He was also very impressed with the Raku firing I did with my Art Club. He couldn't believe that a kiln I built at home, with some everyday objects, could work so well.

 

As I have mentioned before, I do worry that he might be looking for a Superintendent job in the near future. I hope I'm wrong.

 

 

When you get a good administrator, it is really hard to give them up to a new job. You can only hope that if that happens he upfronts the guy coming in. I have had this happen to me, and it has been a big surprise. The curriculum coordinator that was leaving, talked up the program to the assistant superintendent that was taking over her job. It helped. Not completely, but some. Everyone has to make up their own mind as to the relevancy of something.

 

 

 

No doubt there. For the first time I can say, all my Administrators are good. Our Assistant Principal/ Activities Director, will probably be on his way out in a couple years. I'll be really sad to see him go. He's been around enough, that he knows how things were done. For instance, the Art Club had some wood display boards constructed several years ago, for various art shows we do. I was given the run around by some of the maintenance staff, in regards to their location. I was basically told, that I should know where they are at. The AD called them out on the issue. Turns out, that the year before, one of the previous teachers tried to find them, and she was told, they were taken to the dump. Turns out, the wood from them, was used to create a storage area for softball. So that teacher had to have some new boards built. Then, when I get there, they almost go missing again. Without the AD on my side to say, "Wait, why does this keep happening?", I would have been in for an uphill battle.

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