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catpaws

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I bisque fired my kiln as per normal using the programmer and firing overnight. I go in the next evening to unload and open the door to have the entire contents have all exploded....yup, every single piece. The kiln was off and cold by this time.

The next time I try to fire up, I find the controller won't register any other temp apart from 0 degrees. It's clearly had it.

I don't know if the thing just kept getting hotter and hotter til everything blew up or what. The kiln had switched off though so I can't imagine it did otherwise it would still have been going wouldn't it?

Also, how do I check the elements are ok? and how can I check what's wrong with the controller....it still has the ability to show a temp. even if it is 0.

 

I'm moving abroad soon so may well scrap the damn thing and buy a top loader which I can use on an ordinary domestic supply, any suggestions?

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Also, how do I check the elements are ok? and how can I check what's wrong with the controller....it still has the ability to show a temp. even if it is 0.

 

Disconnect the power for 10 seconds and restart the controller. Clean the broken clay from the kiln--especially the element grooves. Did you include witness cones with that firing?

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

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catpaws is totally correct! First order of reprograming is... turn it off or unplug it! Saved a repair many times... on many things. But... remember to plug it back in! Nothing more embarrassing then for a repair man to come in and plug it in for you... sigh... Scout

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When controllers go bad they do all sorts of weird things. If there is a problem with the thermocouple input portion of the board, it may have tried its hardest to heat up, which was too fast and blew up your pots. Then when it didn't get hotter it shut down. Did you get an error code? If not, then you may be looking at a fried board. If there's any chance there is moisture on the board, open up the panel and dry it out with a hair dryer. Check the connection where the thermocouple joins with the board, making sure the terminals are still firmly attached. A new board for Skutt or L&L runs about $260.

 

To check elements, you'll need to find out the element resistance. Call the manufacturer or look it up in your manual or online. Then use a meter to check the resistance (ohms) from inside the panel, where the elements enter the panel. If they are more than 10% off from the original, they are due for replacement.

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May I make a suggestion? Change your firing schedule, instead of turning on the kiln and going to bed how about turning it on first thing in the AM and letting it cool off while you are sleeping? I realize it is cheaper to fire at night and less likely to have brown outs but you really need to be around and awake while the kiln fires, if you can. You may have been able to hear what was going on and stopped the firing.

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May I make a suggestion? Change your firing schedule, instead of turning on the kiln and going to bed how about turning it on first thing in the AM and letting it cool off while you are sleeping? I realize it is cheaper to fire at night and less likely to have brown outs but you really need to be around and awake while the kiln fires, if you can. You may have been able to hear what was going on and stopped the firing.

 

yeh, you could be right there!

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May I make a suggestion? Change your firing schedule, instead of turning on the kiln and going to bed how about turning it on first thing in the AM and letting it cool off while you are sleeping? I realize it is cheaper to fire at night and less likely to have brown outs but you really need to be around and awake while the kiln fires, if you can. You may have been able to hear what was going on and stopped the firing.

 

yeh, you could be right there!

 

Maybe this is a stupid question here, or maybe insulting to some, but are you certain the work was bone dry before firing? At the same time was this during or after a rainy day where the atmospheric moisture was up? It does happen to effect the way a load fires.

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I bisque fired my kiln as per normal using the programmer and firing overnight. I go in the next evening to unload and open the door to have the entire contents have all exploded....yup, every single piece. The kiln was off and cold by this time.

The next time I try to fire up, I find the controller won't register any other temp apart from 0 degrees. It's clearly had it.

I don't know if the thing just kept getting hotter and hotter til everything blew up or what. The kiln had switched off though so I can't imagine it did otherwise it would still have been going wouldn't it?

Also, how do I check the elements are ok? and how can I check what's wrong with the controller....it still has the ability to show a temp. even if it is 0.

 

I'm moving abroad soon so may well scrap the damn thing and buy a top loader which I can use on an ordinary domestic supply, any suggestions?

 

 

You would be able to tell when the kiln went off by how fired your clay looks. Is it bisque pink? or high fired looking? Is it still basically raw?

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May I make a suggestion? Change your firing schedule, instead of turning on the kiln and going to bed how about turning it on first thing in the AM and letting it cool off while you are sleeping? I realize it is cheaper to fire at night and less likely to have brown outs but you really need to be around and awake while the kiln fires, if you can. You may have been able to hear what was going on and stopped the firing.

 

 

yeh, you could be right there!

 

 

Maybe this is a stupid question here, or maybe insulting to some, but are you certain the work was bone dry before firing? At the same time was this during or after a rainy day where the atmospheric moisture was up? It does happen to effect the way a load fires.

 

 

no it was absolutely bone dry, I'm always really really careful about that.

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