Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Cremation Urrn


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#21 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,625 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:07 AM


I will also say I have cremated my own two cats in my gas kiln so I have some experience in this .
Mark

I don't mean this to sound callous or judgemental, I'm just curious, did you really do this? Having just lost a dog a bit ago, I can imagine this must have been difficult. Thanks for your response.


Let me tell you my story about my cat Xeno. He was my pick of the litter and was Abyssinian .
I had him for 19 years-he was a great tabby tiger striped Manx with no tail-we were very close -we shower together -me every day he choose once a month. I have had animals my whole life and this cat was very special-he was more like a dog -followed me around and waited all day outside the potshop for me to finish up.-I bring home food from the sea and he liked fresh abalone /scollops and tuna with some salmon tossed in. As the years went by we became a close nit pair. He slept with me after his showers and always had a great attitude. As he aged he lost most of his hearing and when he was 17 he got into a tuff and had some nerve damage-I drove him 6 hours to UC Davis veterinary school in Davis Ca. He eventually healed up again. A few years later his heart started to get elliptical and smaller-eventually his heart gave out-but for a while i injected him with fuilds for months to keep him chipper. One knows the time when its time for them to check out.I knew his night has cone and slept with him and he died in my arms after taking his last breath in the middle of the night. I said and had my piece with him and put him in our chest freezer for about 6 months. After xmas I curled him in a large bowl and fired him to-ash temp. My good friend Woody the vet gave me the specs-We have been friends for over 40 years. I had made my urn and will take a photo of it in am.I spread some of his ashes in his favorite spots like in the rows of corn in garden where he snoozed the summer away waiting for me to come out of the studio. I have a rough draft of a story about this cat with another artist who is great with cat drawing and some day may put this cats story to book form-I have about 7 ideas all going at once these days.
as far as firing him (I also did my friend cat a year later) this ashes thing was not callous as I loved this cat more than some people. But you see I've spread both my brothers ashes as well as both parents and a stepfather and a few dogs so ones gets a bit used to the procedure-its never easy just part of life and in my case a bit to much.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#22 trina

trina

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 437 posts

Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:29 PM



I will also say I have cremated my own two cats in my gas kiln so I have some experience in this .
Mark

I don't mean this to sound callous or judgemental, I'm just curious, did you really do this? Having just lost a dog a bit ago, I can imagine this must have been difficult. Thanks for your response.


Let me tell you my story about my cat Xeno. He was my pick of the litter and was Abyssinian .
I had him for 19 years-he was a great tabby tiger striped Manx with no tail-we were very close -we shower together -me every day he choose once a month. I have had animals my whole life and this cat was very special-he was more like a dog -followed me around and waited all day outside the potshop for me to finish up.-I bring home food from the sea and he liked fresh abalone /scollops and tuna with some salmon tossed in. As the years went by we became a close nit pair. He slept with me after his showers and always had a great attitude. As he aged he lost most of his hearing and when he was 17 he got into a tuff and had some nerve damage-I drove him 6 hours to UC Davis veterinary school in Davis Ca. He eventually healed up again. A few years later his heart started to get elliptical and smaller-eventually his hear gave out-but for a while i injected him with fuilds for months to keep him chipper. One knows the time when its time for them to check out.I knew his night has cone and slept with him and he died in my arms after taking his last breath. in the middle of the night. I said and had my piece with him and put him in our chest freezer for about 6 months. After xmas I curled him in a large bowl and fired him to-ash temp. My good friend Woody the vet gave me the specs-We have been friends for over 40 years. I had made my urn and will take a photo of it in am.I spread some of his ashes in his favorite spots like in the rows of corn in garden where he snoozed the summer away waiting for me to come out of the studio. I have a rough draft of a story about this cat with another artist who is great with cat drawing and some day may put this cats story to book form-I have about 7 ideas all going at once these days.
as far as firing him (I also did my friend cat a year later) this ashes thing was not callous as I loved this cat more than some people. Bt you see I've spread both my brothers ashes as well as both parents and a stepfather and a few dogs so ones gets a bit used to the procedure-its never easy just part of life and in my case a bit to much.
Mark


i have tears.... T

#23 christerrell

christerrell

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 23 November 2012 - 05:03 AM

Thank you, that's very helpful. Thanks also to the other Community members who have responded to my question on this; I appreciate it.

Chris

#24 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,625 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 10 January 2014 - 04:05 PM

My pot in the moniker photo (the orangish one with bamboo handle) is an urn for some friends in Atlanta currently-It was a gift to them.

Porcelain fored to cone 10 reduction .

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#25 bny

bny

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 05:44 PM

I would not try firing cremains in a sealed container.  In an experiment a few months ago, I mixed some nutritional supplement bone meal with feldspar and kaolin and fired a small amount.  I got a sort of ceramic foam: glassed outer surface, foam-like interior.

 

A quick look online suggests cremation temperatures of 1400F to 1800F, versus 1100C (2012F) for calcining bone ash.  A reaction with gas going into or coming out of the reaction seems likely, and you are nearly certain to have previously absorbed water coming out as vapor, even if there is no reaction.

 

Even if there is no reaction, nor evolution of water vapor, you must deal with the ideal gas law: PV=nRT.  R and n are constant, you say that you want to make V constant (sealed system), and you are proposing to make T large.  That is guaranteed to make P large (pressure increase).

 

All of that aside, ask yourself if there are any other circumstances under which you would try to fire a sealed container with a large interior void space.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users