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Has a particular workshop or demonstration that you attended influenced your work? | May 14, 2012


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#1 DPancioli

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 08:33 AM

Has a workshop or demo influenced your work?



Did it "open your eyes" in some new way? Who gave it?
What did you learn? Was it early or late in your potting career?

Was there more than one influential workshop?


Diana Pancioli
Potters Council Board Member
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dianapancioli.com

#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 19 May 2012 - 06:22 PM

I am thoroughly enjoying a workshop by Tony Clennell this weekend.

Other standout workshops: Bill VanGilder (functional pottery), Michael Sherrill (extruder), Sequoia Miller (altered forms), Akira Satake (kohiki slip), Hank Murrow (tea bowls and other forms), John Britt (glazing).

#3 Nelly

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 02:38 PM

I am thoroughly enjoying a workshop by Tony Clennell this weekend.

Other standout workshops: Bill VanGilder (functional pottery), Michael Sherrill (extruder), Sequoia Miller (altered forms), Akira Satake (kohiki slip), Hank Murrow (tea bowls and other forms), John Britt (glazing).


Dear Forum,

I am lucky to have had many great instructors in career as what I would call a pottery "tourist." I have been to several Anderson Ranch workshops and been taught by Walter Ostrum and Victoria Christenson and Jan and Randy (I forget their last names--I am embarrassed).

I too have taken a one day workshop by Tony Clennell.

I am also an Internet Hound so watch for new postings daily.

For me, each of my teachers in whatever format has given me some great influence on what it is that I do.

Walter Ostrum made me think about color and working to my absolute best--details and finishing.

Victoria Christenson, in addition, helped me to see the pottery vessel as a canvas and that with some slip I could get some great results (i.e., both medium and low fire).

Tony Clennel said "if you are going to make a mark, any mark, make it strong so that it shows intentionality." He also helped me master handles.

Jan taught me that pots can be thick and still beautiful.

Randy taught me some wonderful ways to work with slabs and how to be free with my decoration.

Robin Hopper also helped me with his wonderful tapes of instruction. He has such an excellent series.

I didn't mention Allegany Meadows. He taught me a number of things (how to use plastic on a rim to smooth it out when you don't have a chamois, the variety of rim shapes, how to make a jug with cut out pieces etc.).

So many people have influenced me it is hard to tally up.

I revert to each of their styles or things I learned from the workshop when I am in need.

I have been told that I should develop one style and stick to it. But at this point I believe I am still just playing and trying out new things. I know what has sold for me (i.e., platters and bowls). This is where I have made my money. The bolder and stronger the design, the more people seem to like it at shows.

But I have to say, there is no one exact person who has influenced me 100%. I just use what they taught me and thank them silently when I use their specific techniques in my studio.

For example, right now, I have four large platters in the kiln. When these plates come out, I will think about how I used Robin Hopper's Mocha Diffusion technique in his video series.

Nelly

#4 Nutical

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 04:09 AM

I am thoroughly enjoying a workshop by Tony Clennell this weekend.

Other standout workshops: Bill VanGilder (functional pottery), Michael Sherrill (extruder), Sequoia Miller (altered forms), Akira Satake (kohiki slip), Hank Murrow (tea bowls and other forms), John Britt (glazing).


Also enjoying these workshops.

#5 JBaymore

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 09:24 AM

I'd have to say that this has happened for me countless times in 40+ years. Every workshop or conference presentation that I attend has had some impact on my work in some way.

Sometimes I pick up a new idea for a forming or decorating technique. Sometimes I get an affirmation that I actually DO have a clue what I understand about something. Sometimes I figure out why I have decided to never do something, and the presentation further cements that concept. Sometimes something said sparks an internal thought process that leads into new insights. Sometimes something makes me remember that working with clay FT is a real privledge and is a lot of fun.

The list goes on and on and on. NEVER stop learning!


best,

..............................john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com




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