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Just how much weather protection does a kiln need?


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#1 Isculpt

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 04:47 PM

I don't have space for a kiln inside my newly remodeled studio (well, actually, in-progress remodel), so my intention is to put it on a wood-decked porch that is quite small -- 6'x10'. I intended to close the space in with panels of durarock or something similar that may not quite reach the ceiling and floor. Open exposure would be maybe a foot top and bottom. I live in South Carolina, in a valley that gets very humid in the summertime (and wintertime and springtime....) The side of the house where the porch is located doesn't get much mold on it, so I'm guessing that it's the least humid spot, which isn't saying much. The location is "temporary" -- for a year or so. Is there any way to make this situation better or -- Is this an all-around bad idea?

#2 minspargal

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 06:11 PM

Is it an electric kiln?

#3 pw1

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 11:32 AM

I live in Mississippi, very humid!! I have had my electric kiln outside since I bought it about 4 years ago. My husband made a rolling cover out of hardy board. The cover has a top and 3 sides with handles to help me roll it. The kiln sits on the East side of the house at least a foot away from the brick exterior of the house. The kiln is on the leg base and the area where it is sitting is brick pavers. He used large casters on the bottom so when I am ready to use the kiln, I am able to roll it away and the cover is large enough to cover the kiln even when it is firing. The only problem I cannot load/unload when it is raining! However, I have been able to work around the weather. He used anchor bolts in the brick exterior in order to anchor the cover to the house to keep the wind from possibly catching it and blowing it around. The kiln is beginning to show a little rust in places, particularly on the handle, but that will be easy enough to replace. I am just a hobby potter and have only about 100 fires on the kiln but so far everything has worked great.

#4 Isculpt

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 06:12 PM

Yes, it is an electric kiln. It sounds as if my kiln will be alright if a kiln can survive Mississippi outdoor conditions! (Although I don't see how even Mississippi could be more humid than South Carolina!) Ugh, I hate humidity, I hate humidity, I hate humidity....

#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 06:23 PM

I would make sure you protect the kiln from dew as well as rain.
Tropical South Texas has serious humidity and dew drips off the roof every morning. Usually if something has a cover, the dew is no problem.

Marcia Selsor

#6 DirtRoads

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 09:37 PM

I don't have space for a kiln inside my newly remodeled studio (well, actually, in-progress remodel), so my intention is to put it on a wood-decked porch that is quite small -- 6'x10'. I intended to close the space in with panels of durarock or something similar that may not quite reach the ceiling and floor. Open exposure would be maybe a foot top and bottom. I live in South Carolina, in a valley that gets very humid in the summertime (and wintertime and springtime....) The side of the house where the porch is located doesn't get much mold on it, so I'm guessing that it's the least humid spot, which isn't saying much. The location is "temporary" -- for a year or so. Is there any way to make this situation better or -- Is this an all-around bad idea?


Wood deck ....... you will have to have something for floor that is fire proof like concrete pavers.

Why do you have to leave a foot space on top and bottom? I am guessing you have more than 8 foot height? I used a fiber board to enclose a carport and it has worked well. If you have more than 8 feet (the length of all building panels), consider starting the panels at the top and cut another piece for skirting so you won't get any water blowing in. You have to consider the wind factor. Most open carports and patios in the south get water blown in all areas at some time or another if not enclosed. Here's a picture of my enclosure. (I've forgotten what those panels are called but they are like $25 for a 4' x 8' at Lowe's) I dropped a two foot piece over door way and then set another panel about 4 feet in. I get no rain at all in the carport now. It's my understanding you need to protect your kiln completely from rain.

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#7 Isculpt

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 10:15 PM


I don't have space for a kiln inside my newly remodeled studio (well, actually, in-progress remodel), so my intention is to put it on a wood-decked porch that is quite small -- 6'x10'. I intended to close the space in with panels of durarock or something similar that may not quite reach the ceiling and floor. Open exposure would be maybe a foot top and bottom. I live in South Carolina, in a valley that gets very humid in the summertime (and wintertime and springtime....) The side of the house where the porch is located doesn't get much mold on it, so I'm guessing that it's the least humid spot, which isn't saying much. The location is "temporary" -- for a year or so. Is there any way to make this situation better or -- Is this an all-around bad idea?


Wood deck ....... you will have to have something for floor that is fire proof like concrete pavers.

Why do you have to leave a foot space on top and bottom? I am guessing you have more than 8 foot height? I used a fiber board to enclose a carport and it has worked well. If you have more than 8 feet (the length of all building panels), consider starting the panels at the top and cut another piece for skirting so you won't get any water blowing in. You have to consider the wind factor. Most open carports and patios in the south get water blown in all areas at some time or another if not enclosed. Here's a picture of my enclosure. (I've forgotten what those panels are called but they are like $25 for a 4' x 8' at Lowe's) I dropped a two foot piece over door way and then set another panel about 4 feet in. I get no rain at all in the carport now. It's my understanding you need to protect your kiln completely from rain.



Yeah, you're right. I was going for the easy way out....



#8 trina

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 03:46 PM

I have one small kiln outside under a porch at my house, I live in very dry conditions but had to make sure that the kiln is covered when not in use. I really suffered from some growing rusty spots. I use this kiln for smaller objects or tests, so maybe that it is not in regular use has something to do with it as I havent had any problems with my other equipment. T

#9 neilestrick

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:08 PM

Moisture destroys electric kilns. Sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly.

The kiln must be completely protected from rain at all times. Just covering when it's not firing does not cut it. You need at least a 48 hour window to load, fire and cool the kiln. If a storm rolls in, will it stay dry? Think worst case scenario here- an inch an hour with 60mph winds gusts.

Dew is definitely a problem. A lot of moisture can be taken into the bricks and drip into the control box if it's exposed to the morning dew.

Moisture will slowly rust and corrode the metal parts in your kiln, including element connections, the kiln sitter, hinge, hardware, etc. The humidity alone will increase the rate of corrosion, even if it's out of the rain and dew.

Moisture will kill the circuit board on a computerized kiln. Would you feel safe leaving a laptop computer out there?

You cannot put a kiln on a wood deck unless you lay down 3 layers of cement board that extend at least 2 feet past the edge of the kiln. But even then I wouldn't recommend it.

I vote all around bad idea.
Neil Estrick
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com




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