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Glaze firing schedule for gas kiln


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#21 gypsy

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:00 AM

^You folks are so lucky to have this knowledge and understanding of gas kilns and reduction. I want so badly to own a gas kiln but can't afford one and am afraid it would be too difficult to fire. I am humbled by the knowledge you guys have Do used gas kilns ever appear for sale? I have never seen on advertised...but who would want to give one up.

#22 neilestrick

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 10:49 AM

You don't need a gas kiln! I fired cone 10 reduction for 15 years, then switched to cone 6 electric and never looked back. I'm making the best pots and glazes I ever have. Don't feel like gas is better than electric. It's not. It's just different.
Neil Estrick
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#23 Red Rocks

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:45 PM

You don't want to put anything directly in front of the burner port. Assuming we're talking about burners going in horizontally, there should be a target brick in the middle of the firebox that breaks up the flame.



Actually the burners are vertical - coming up through the floor - right in front of the bottom peep. The idea is to put a post or refractory across the middle of the port so that you are not blocking it - just moving the flame to each side.


I also heard today that a local teacher user a rebar pole and he touches the cone when he can't see it. This seems to make the cone easier to see. I am going to try that next time.

#24 Red Rocks

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Posted 27 April 2013 - 07:46 PM

A solid thin piece of soft brick or hard behind cones works like a post -anything to set the cones off visually.
Spiting the flame with a post may or may not help
Darker glasses will help as well as a laser pointer (or so I'm told)
Mark



I actually have a laser pointer, so I will try that as well.

#25 Mark C.

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 12:01 AM

Red Rocks
My little 12 cubic Burman updraft has 6 burners pointing up like yours-(Its almost to cone 10 now) and I do not even put cones on bottom as its always hotter there and I fire it only with top cones.I load all the need heat glazes on bottom and cool glazes on top and its worked great like this for past 20-25 years.I know its always a cone or more off on bottom and just accept it.
Mark
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#26 Red Rocks

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 06:34 PM

Red Rocks
My little 12 cubic Burman updraft has 6 burners pointing up like yours-(Its almost to cone 10 now) and I do not even put cones on bottom as its always hotter there and I fire it only with top cones.I load all the need heat glazes on bottom and cool glazes on top and its worked great like this for past 20-25 years.I know its always a cone or more off on bottom and just accept it.
Mark



Mark


Sage advice as always from you. That is probably where I will end up as soon as I figure our which glazes thru at each temp.....

#27 neilestrick

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:07 AM


You don't want to put anything directly in front of the burner port. Assuming we're talking about burners going in horizontally, there should be a target brick in the middle of the firebox that breaks up the flame.



Actually the burners are vertical - coming up through the floor - right in front of the bottom peep. The idea is to put a post or refractory across the middle of the port so that you are not blocking it - just moving the flame to each side.


I also heard today that a local teacher user a rebar pole and he touches the cone when he can't see it. This seems to make the cone easier to see. I am going to try that next time.



I wouldn't put anything across a port. It would probably cause back pressure more than anything, unless the block was above the port at least a couple of inches.
Neil Estrick
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L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com




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