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those pesky air bubbles


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#1 smokin pots

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:32 AM

What is the best way to pop an air bubble that shows up when throwing a form on the wheel? Also, the ones
that you are trying to get rid of when smoothing out a hand built form. Is there a certain angle to go at it with
your pin tool so it does not reappear? I know there is a better way of going about it than I am doing, because I
have to keep popping that same pesky bubble over and over again even if I go deep.
Juli
la paloma texas pottery

#2 Denice

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:42 AM

I use a slab roller a lot and will discover bubbles now and then, I usually cut a small x and then gently work my way around the bubble pushing inward towards the x cut then smooth it over. Denice

#3 smokin pots

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:18 AM

I like the X idea Denice! I will give that a try.
Juli
la paloma texas pottery

#4 yedrow

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:38 AM

I have a personal trick that can work real good on the wheel. While your clay is spinning insert the needle tool a little under the bubble. Then, spiral the tool up the clay as you follow with your finger and press in the gap below it. This allows the air to escape from the gap while you seal it back up. A couple of passes usually does the trick.

Beyond that, outside of big air bubbles, unless they are on the lip I usually ignore them. We had a guy at work clean out the pug mill and not put it back together right, and we threw with 'rice crispy' clay for six months.

#5 Pres

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:42 PM

I have a personal trick that can work real good on the wheel. While your clay is spinning insert the needle tool a little under the bubble. Then, spiral the tool up the clay as you follow with your finger and press in the gap below it. This allows the air to escape from the gap while you seal it back up. A couple of passes usually does the trick.

Beyond that, outside of big air bubbles, unless they are on the lip I usually ignore them. We had a guy at work clean out the pug mill and not put it back together right, and we threw with 'rice crispy' clay for six months.


I usually ignore small air pockets as well when throwing. Larger one I put a pin prick at each end, and then rub in the middle to remove the air, then make a non pulling pull over the area, before continuing to throw.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#6 bciskepottery

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 05:15 PM

On slabs, I use my pin tool . . . making sure to poke a hole (2 if its a bigger bubble) completely through the slab. Straight down, not angled. Then recompress with rolling pin and/or rib.

#7 SusanM

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:15 AM

I have a question related to this topic- recently some of my pots have come out of the kiln with "blisters" and warts on them. Are these from trapped air bubbles? I didn't think there was any in the piece as I was throwing it, but they appear after the final firing.

#8 yedrow

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:10 AM

I have a question related to this topic- recently some of my pots have come out of the kiln with "blisters" and warts on them. Are these from trapped air bubbles? I didn't think there was any in the piece as I was throwing it, but they appear after the final firing.


The problem is likely in your bisquing. Air bubbles really only have a cosmetic effect, at least in my experience. You might first try going slower through your firing cycle, especially until 1500f or so. Also, make sure your clay is right for the cone to which you are firing.

#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:49 PM

Way back when (1968), I watched Don Reitz just slice open large air bubbles and fill them with clay from throwing the piece.
SOme were 2 inches long, but these were large pieces. So even the big guys have air bubbles.


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#10 Pres

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 09:31 PM

Way back when (1968), I watched Don Reitz just slice open large air bubbles and fill them with clay from throwing the piece.
SOme were 2 inches long, but these were large pieces. So even the big guys have air bubbles.


Marcia


Wedging large amounts of clay back then was not nearly as efficient as having a de-airing pug mill. Oh what a dream to figure that into my budget!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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