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SmartsyArtsy

experience with Bevel tools?

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My biggest challemge right now seems to be neatness and I suck at bevels which I need to form neat seams. I have been researching and found 4 tools, 3 of which were mentioned on this site-- Dirty Girls Slab Bevel Tool, Xiem’s rib-shuaped and AccuAngle sliding beveler. There is one more -- van Gilder product which doesn't appear to be available any longer.

 

What I am looking for is real-time experience and pros and cons by a user. Thanks

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I make my own . . . 45, 60 and 30 degrees. With a little application of geometry, it was not hard to figure out. I used some thin/narrow scrap wood, thin wire, and two small washers/wood screws. I started out using them for making boxes from hard slabs, where I wanted a wider, stronger seam than just a plain butt joint and a clean cut. I had tried using an exacto knife, but that was not accurate or consistent enough. I now use them even on soft slab vessels. The 60 degree tool really allows for a smoother join of two slabs with little evidence of the overlap and a nice wide surface for getting a good join. Mine are among the essentials of my hand-building tools.

 

I think the Van Gilder tool you are looking for is actually his edge rounding tool . . . basically a chamfer tool used in woodworking to round sharp edges, not for beveling/mitering edges for scoring, slipping, and joining.

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I make my own . . . 45, 60 and 30 degrees. With a little application of geometry, it was not hard to figure out. I used some thin/narrow scrap wood, thin wire, and two small washers/wood screws. I started out using them for making boxes from hard slabs, where I wanted a wider, stronger seam than just a plain butt joint and a clean cut. I had tried using an exacto knife, but that was not accurate or consistent enough. I now use them even on soft slab vessels. The 60 degree tool really allows for a smoother join of two slabs with little evidence of the overlap and a nice wide surface for getting a good join. Mine are among the essentials of my hand-building tools.

 

I think the Van Gilder tool you are looking for is actually his edge rounding tool . . . basically a chamfer tool used in woodworking to round sharp edges, not for beveling/mitering edges for scoring, slipping, and joining.

 

 

I have also made my own bevel tools when teaching. I made multiples of the same tool by gluing 3/4 inch stock of different widths together. cut into 3" L shaped blocks, and add a cutting wire in a notch. These were very stable and worked well.

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Am I correct in thinking that these L-shaped tools (pic1) are used with the clay edge standing vertically? as opposed to the design in the second pic, which is used with the clay edge on a flat surface.

 

 

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/116857054891054246514/CeramicTools?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCMq0zdGmpLem4QE&feat=directlink

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Am I correct in thinking that these L-shaped tools (pic1) are used with the clay edge standing vertically? as opposed to the design in the second pic, which is used with the clay edge on a flat surface.

 

 

 

https://picasaweb.go...feat=directlink

 

 

Imagine that this is a cross section and that it could be 2-5 inches long, depending on how you want to use it. If you had made one 2 feet long you could cut it into 2" sections and have a ton of them for classroom use. Change the dimensions for different angles. Some of them I built I used a threaded insert, drilled a hole through a thumbscrew and inserted the wire ends-tighten and its works fine.

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Thanks Pres. My damaged brain (real injury) has trouble with neg/pos, directional thinking. Makes me nuts sometimes!

 

 

No problem, my visualization skills are great. . . .I'm waiting for the rest of me to catch up.

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