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pottery with elementary students


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#1 meisie

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 09:24 AM

I have the opportunity to put a kiln in my classroom and I have one that was given to me. It's a kiln that goes as high as cone 6 for which I have used it. However as I look though my school catalogs many of the glazes are low fire. I need to write a grant for the supplies and I think I want to stick with low fire for a classroom but all my experience has been with cone 6 clay and glazes. Does anyone have any recommendations as to what would be best? I also wonder at the amount of glaze and clay I might need. At the moment we use air dry clay and I buy one 25lb bag for a classroom of 24 or so kids then we paint with acrylics. It will only be the 5th grade students which would be about 200 students between the two art teachers.
Suggestions
Things to look out for?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
Renee Popek

#2 oldlady

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:26 PM

I have the opportunity to put a kiln in my classroom and I have one that was given to me. It's a kiln that goes as high as cone 6 for which I have used it. However as I look though my school catalogs many of the glazes are low fire. I need to write a grant for the supplies and I think I want to stick with low fire for a classroom but all my experience has been with cone 6 clay and glazes. Does anyone have any recommendations as to what would be best? I also wonder at the amount of glaze and clay I might need. At the moment we use air dry clay and I buy one 25lb bag for a classroom of 24 or so kids then we paint with acrylics. It will only be the 5th grade students which would be about 200 students between the two art teachers.
Suggestions
Things to look out for?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you
Renee Popek


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#3 oldlady

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:28 PM

contact AMACO. they publish all kinds of stuff for teachers. low fire, cone 06 clay is easier on the kiln and simple to use. try it. no need for cone 6.
"putting you down does not raise me up."

#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 03:33 PM

Check out John Post, an elementary art teacher in Michigan and potter. His website, blog and youtube videos show a wide range of projects for different grade levels.

http://www.johnpost.us/

#5 meisie

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:30 PM

Check out John Post, an elementary art teacher in Michigan and potter. His website, blog and youtube videos show a wide range of projects for different grade levels.

http://www.johnpost.us/


Great site and great projects thanks

#6 Pres

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 01:08 PM


Check out John Post, an elementary art teacher in Michigan and potter. His website, blog and youtube videos show a wide range of projects for different grade levels.

http://www.johnpost.us/


Great site and great projects thanks


As with most Art Ed, the success for the project in Elementary falls entirely on the teacher, in Secondary it is a shared beast. When working with Elementary children don't make a common mistake and water the lesson down too far by oversimplifying the processes or the theories behind the project. When working with elementary kids slab projects that were well thought out, and had good visuals and demonstrations were very successful. They responded well to projects that they could take home to mom-narturally. However, they have matured way beyond the candy dishes, ashtrays and zoo animals of yesteryear.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#7 neilestrick

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 12:07 PM

I recommend using underglazes for color, and a clear glaze on top. Underglazes are easier for the kids to use, they don't change color from wet to fired, and they don't run. You won't have to worry so much about kids glazing too thick and puddling glazes on your kiln shelves.

Whatever you buy, double check that they are food safe, and that they are certified non-toxic and safe for use by your kids. These are two different safety labels. Food safety refers to the fired glaze. Non-Toxic refers to the raw glaze before firing. Some glazes are not Non-Toxic, some are only approved for use by kids over age 12.

Whenever you order any art materials, remember to request MSDS (Material safety Data Sheets) with your order. Schools are required by OSHA to keep a folder with MSDS sheets for all art materials. If you request them with the order it's much easier than trying to get them later.
Neil Estrick
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#8 meisie

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:32 PM

I recommend using underglazes for color, and a clear glaze on top. Underglazes are easier for the kids to use, they don't change color from wet to fired, and they don't run. You won't have to worry so much about kids glazing too thick and puddling glazes on your kiln shelves.

Whatever you buy, double check that they are food safe, and that they are certified non-toxic and safe for use by your kids. These are two different safety labels. Food safety refers to the fired glaze. Non-Toxic refers to the raw glaze before firing. Some glazes are not Non-Toxic, some are only approved for use by kids over age 12.

Whenever you order any art materials, remember to request MSDS (Material safety Data Sheets) with your order. Schools are required by OSHA to keep a folder with MSDS sheets for all art materials. If you request them with the order it's much easier than trying to get them later.


Thanks that's a good point and I wasn't thinking in that direction. I like that idea. Less work for me. Also with the MSDS. I will keep track of that I hadn't thought of that either.
Thank you very much
Renee

#9 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 06:07 PM

I used Amaco Teachers Choice glazes when doing a mask project with 6th graders -- low fire red clay and low fire glazes. The glazes are certified for school use. Colors are what you see is what you get; plus, you can blend them just like other types of paints for colors. Mostly, the glazes were very stable, with little to no movement during firing. Bright colors.

#10 meisie

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 04:24 PM

I used Amaco Teachers Choice glazes when doing a mask project with 6th graders -- low fire red clay and low fire glazes. The glazes are certified for school use. Colors are what you see is what you get; plus, you can blend them just like other types of paints for colors. Mostly, the glazes were very stable, with little to no movement during firing. Bright colors.




Thanks they are in the catalog that I order my supplies from that's good to know.
I appreciate your time.
Renee




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