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Firing of pots with cracks made with Sodium Silicate


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#21 oldlady

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 01:46 PM

for those unfamiliar with this technique, there are lovely pieces shown on the facebook website for Pottery Boys.  Glenn Woods has been doing this for awhile and his pots show the care he takes with every step.  watching his demos is a treat.  he showed us a new related step at the last guild meeting, where a thin textured slab was applied to a cylinder and stretched. they are fired in electric kilns to cone 6 using little loafers clay.  

 

mark, this makes the little loafers stop loafing!


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#22 Pres

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 03:01 PM

Welcome to the light Paul! We look forward to hearing more from you.


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#23 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 04:39 AM

Paul: welcome to this forum! We are happy that you finally decided to speak up! I like your glazed pot with the sodium silicate cracks. Funny, I never thought of glazing my pieces when using sodium silicate. I always either pit fired them or did Obvara. There are many most beautiful obvara'd (is that a word??) pieces in Marcia Selsor's gallery.

 

oldlady: thanks for the tip!

 

Evelyne


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#24 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 04:42 AM

 

 

The point is, when working with this technique one must be watching ahead to how to treat the surface in the final firing. Glaze the inside, leave the outside unglazed, glaze the inside, glaze parts of the outside, glaze in a transparent glaze, or work in some other direction. hmmmmm. ...

 

I second that Pres!

 

Jackie: welcome to the forum. Glad this topic is of interest to you.

 

Evelyne


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#25 JBaymore

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 10:02 AM

I've been using the sodium silicate business for probably 30 years or so now.  On a lot of work.  Someone from Japan or Korea first taught it to me.... but it is so long ago I can't remember who.  Tons of ways to work with the general concept.  It can be used on slab work also (think about it.)

 

The key here is to think of it as a path to an end... not as an end in itself.  It's a slick trick to create a (what used to be unique) surface.  The question is how do you mesh that technique and that surface into your own particular aesthetic expression.

 

I use up my photo file size allotment here on the anagama construction pictures I posted a short while .... so can't post any more here..... but in my gallery are a number of pieces that use that technique as a PART of the whole expression of the pieces.

 

Here's one:  http://community.cer...urd-shape-vase/

 

best,

 

........................john


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#26 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 18 January 2015 - 12:47 PM

 

 

The question is how do you mesh that technique and that surface into your own particular aesthetic expression.

 

 

 

Yes exactly. Good point John!

 

Addendum: I just had (another) look at your gallery. Boyoboy, I like that Oribe style glaze!!


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#27 Mouten Keramik

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 12:59 PM

So the first piece came out of the kiln yesterday. I'm somewhat satisfied with the results so far. The colors are as sharply defined as I could possibly have hoped. Next time I'll use gosh on the rim as well, and glaze the interior of the pot with something a lot darker.

 

The shape isn't that exciting, so I'll have to work on that going forward.

 

gallery_65534_859_51092.jpg

 

gallery_65534_859_65709.jpg

 

The other piece I mentioned in the last post went into a million pieces during the bisque firing. Furthermore I fell off my bike, and hurt my hand, so I won't be throwing anything before next week atleast :(

 

Oh, and yeah, when I wrote about throwing with one hand, I of course meant during the bellying out of the cylinder, having applied the sodium silicate.


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#28 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 January 2015 - 02:31 PM

Attached File  texturedpotsmall.jpg   47.75KB   1 downloadswelcome, PRankin.
Nice crackle surface. And Mouten, nice cracks on the greenware. It is a fun thing do.Here are some it did recently. Not bisqued yet. (in the kiln!)
the one on the right is just beaten then stretched. The one on the left is beaten, soldium silicate applied and then stretched. One handed throwing is a challenge!
The second image on the right is one of my favorites of obvara and was in the "History in the making" show in Rochester, NY. Pieces used historical techniques or reflected on ancient images, etc.
The third is larger, about 11" a richer coloration from obvara.I really find it fascinating how the clay makes those spiral lines. Your bowl is a good example of the equal spacing of the patterns.
Marcia

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