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Amaco Potters Choice?

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Hi everyone:

 

I am currently experimenting with Amaco Potter's Choice glazes. I applied them to my no. 25 white clay, which was bisque.

 

I applied the glazes fairly heavily and fired to Cone 6. They came out rather muddy with some of the brushstrokes showing. Used Blue Rutile, using a few thick coats.

 

See pic below.

 

Are these glazes better suited for stoneware?

 

 

If I'm using regular bisqueware for the Potter's Choice glazes, should I try to fire to cone 7-8?

 

Thanks for suggestions in advance. :)

post-10505-133449824035_thumb.jpg

post-10505-133449824035_thumb.jpg

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Hi everyone:

 

I am currently experimenting with Amaco Potter's Choice glazes. I applied them to my no. 25 white clay, which was bisque.

 

I applied the glazes fairly heavily and fired to Cone 6. They came out rather muddy with some of the brushstrokes showing. Used Blue Rutile, using a few thick coats.

 

See pic below.

 

Are these glazes better suited for stoneware?

 

 

If I'm using regular bisqueware for the Potter's Choice glazes, should I try to fire to cone 7-8?

 

Thanks for suggestions in advance. :)

 

 

Dear All,

 

My pieces turned out similar. I first did a coat using long strokes. They said for salt buff to apply thin. My second coat was done using a sponging technique and the glaze slightly watered down.

 

Given that I now consider my platter work using Potter's Choice glazes experimental pieces, what I did was when they were still warm enough to accept new glaze (i.e., right out of the kiln), I applied another coat but this time heavier. I did it with brush strokes in select areas. I figure what the heck, it can't hurt. As for firing up, I am not sure.

 

I have always been told with refires to fire down. Someone else may have a different knowledge or an opinion. I am not sure. I just know for me, I am putting a hold on these pieces and waiting till I have a big kiln load of refires and doing a slightly lower fired glaze fire with the heavier application. Sometimes you just never know!!

 

Nellie

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I linked this page in another thread about these glazes but I'll link it here as well. http://www.brackers....s-choice-series Note that they distinguish between the glazes that will "float" and the ones that are more transparent. The floaty glazes need to go on VERY heavily to get an effect. In the pics here http://www.bigcerami...iceLayering.htm there are no less than 4 brushed coats >at a minimum< to get the effect seen.

 

I would not thin them if I were going to brush them on. To dip.....they need quite a bit of thinning.....and I found that if you buy the dry/25lb size you should weigh out and remove 1/3 of the dry mix (8 lbs) before adding the water or the bucket will be very full and the glaze is STILL to thick to dip in mixed as directed.

 

I'm waiting for another load of pitchers to cool.... but I liked what I saw via a quick peek.....

 

The Blue Rutile needs AT LEAST 4...if not 6 coats to get it to run/move/etc.

 

This was in the last load. It's Firebrick Red (from the dry mix)....dipped...twice...with 2-3 "coats" of Seaweed applied heavily with a bulb-type applicator till it ran down the sides.

 

I like it!

post-8561-133452755183_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133452755183_thumb.jpg

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Hi everyone:

 

I am currently experimenting with Amaco Potter's Choice glazes. I applied them to my no. 25 white clay, which was bisque.

 

I applied the glazes fairly heavily and fired to Cone 6. They came out rather muddy with some of the brushstrokes showing. Used Blue Rutile, using a few thick coats.

 

See pic below.

 

Are these glazes better suited for stoneware?

 

 

If I'm using regular bisqueware for the Potter's Choice glazes, should I try to fire to cone 7-8?

 

Thanks for suggestions in advance. smile.gif

 

 

 

Your clay and glazes don’t match. Amaco No. 25 White Clay is a low fire clay. It has an alternate range, but Amaco suggests for this clay, bisque firing to cone 04 and glaze firing to cone 05.

 

The Potter's Choice glazes are fired to cone 5/cone 6. If you have a lot of #25 White Clay you can try the Artist Choice Glazes. The colors and textures are similar to Potter’s Choice but they mature at the lower firing temperature of cone 05.

 

The Opalescent Glazes are beautiful too. But read the Amaco suggestions for these two families of glazes.

 

If you go to the Amaco website and research the glazes and clays you will see that Amaco states which clay they have used for particular results with the Potter's Choice Glazes.

 

The clays that Amaco has used for these results are medium fire clays; #65 Porcelain (matures at cone 5), #38 White Stoneware, (this is a cone 10 high fire clay which was fired to cone 5/cone 6) and #46M Buff Stoneware, (this has a wide firing range but cone 5 glazes are suggested).

 

Amaco also recommends testing before applying the glazes to important work.

 

They have a brochure Part No. 11744E which will show you the test results of the Potter’s Choice Glazes with light, slightly light and slightly heavy coats of glaze. This information is available on the website as well.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for the reply. I figured that it was the clay that I was using. Will look into Artist's Choice glazes for the #25 clay.

 

 

I just purchased a bunch of Amaco no. 48 stoneware, so will throw a couple of small tea bowls and try the Potter's Choice on those and see how they turn out! Thanks again! :)

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I'm about to load a 2nd glaze firing of Amaco's Potter's Choice layered glazes. The first load (cone 5) came out pretty nicely, although the Ancient Jasper may have been thin since it resembles stonewashed denim with red highlights. This load has Palladium in it, both alone and layered over Blue Midnight. Does anyone have a sense of whether cone 5 or 6 would be better? Also, has anyone had any feedback on a metallic taste from an Ancient Jasper bowl? Might this improve at cone 6?

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There are a couple of other threads going right now about these glazes that may answer your question(s), moon....

 

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/topic/2405-firing-scheudle/

 

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/topic/821-anyone-use-amaco-potters-choice-saturation-metallic-or-gold/

 

 

fun stuff. They like to be THICK..........

 

 

good luck

 

 

teardop

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My students love the pictures in the Amaco brochures on layering, but have had great trouble duplicating them. One has to really multiply the top layer several times to get close to the pictured results, in our experience. Still it's not the same.

 

On a similar note, I layered and refired Ancient Jasper over and over in my attempts to get anything but dark or dusty brown, but I had a kiln failure where it didn't get up to temp and the results looked great. That's why I'm intrigued by the comment that you need to fire these lower. I've been tempted, but hate to run the kiln almost empty to experiment. Now I think I'll try it on cone 5.

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My students love the pictures in the Amaco brochures on layering, but have had great trouble duplicating them. One has to really multiply the top layer several times to get close to the pictured results, in our experience. Still it's not the same.

 

On a similar note, I layered and refired Ancient Jasper over and over in my attempts to get anything but dark or dusty brown, but I had a kiln failure where it didn't get up to temp and the results looked great. That's why I'm intrigued by the comment that you need to fire these lower. I've been tempted, but hate to run the kiln almost empty to experiment. Now I think I'll try it on cone 5.

I think you'll be fine @ ^5 - my first kiln had a maximum temp of 1200°C -  I used to fire it to 1185°C with a 15 minute hold - all the PC glazes I used were fine if enough was applied.

 

There's a detailed post (linked below) from Steve Lampron who developed the AJ glaze.

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/476-amaco-ancient-jasper-question/?do=findComment&comment=3228

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