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Cones got to have them


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#1 Mark C.

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:52 PM

My (Got Cones) bumper sticker suggestion got me thinking how special these little critters are to us. They really make or break our work.

Melt at exact temperatures and measure more than just temp.They melt at the right time with time and temperature work on them. That isthey melt with the time it takes to get to a given temperature. Which effects the glaze melt-faster fires melt it less slower rises melt it more. Only cones reflect this factor and melt accordingly.

We take these little things for granted but they really arefantastic

I have been lucky enough to have a huge collection of cones mainly from buying out 3-4 potters who thru in the towel years ago. Also back in the day (1971) was told to throw away all the old cones from the university clay shed I worked in from the 50’s.Those cones missed the dumpster and ended up in use. I have given boxes of extras to our now defunct ceramics guild members over the years.

No matter if you use pre made pads or self supporting or youare like me and always make your own pads.

Next time you place a cone consider what they really do.



I have my cones organized by those used every week and those needed only rarely. I do not use cones for bisque in car kiln anymore and only use two cones per glaze fire-cone ^10/^11 .I’m not suggesting this for anyone. Us old times have our own ways

It is suggested to put 3 cones in with your main cone being the middle cone in pack. This is good practice

Melted cones in the photo are ^10’s and ^11’s.

Get to coning.

Mark

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Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#2 DAY

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 01:59 PM

Speaking of "old timers", draw rings predate cones by a year or two. Or three.
And the REAL old timers (circa 1000 AD, or so) used experience- and their forefathers'- as 'cones'.
Today, thermocouples and digital readouts claim to do the job, but you are right: cones are the jury of last resort for some firings.
I use the "set it and forget it" to fire my L&L kilns, but than I'm not really a potter; just an artist who works with clay instead of wood or canvas. And I do stick a cone or two on the shelves on occasion. Sort of like wearing suspenders AND a belt!

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 06:08 AM

I agree, Mark. ..especially when pyrometers seem to be inaccurate. See John Baymore's post on the celedons today. I use pyrometers on my raky work because I use matt glazes. Firing by eye is tough. It is too fast for cones. But I can put 2 pyrometers next to each other in the same hole of my raku kiln and they can be 100 degrees different.
I use cones in my electrics to assure the temperature is where the digital readout says it is.
On gas firings, it is absolutely necessary and I put cones all over until I know the kilns better (this comes from taking temp. jobs at universities and being unfamiliar with the kilns).

Marcia

#4 Pres

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:57 AM

My (Got Cones) bumper sticker suggestion got me thinking how special these little critters are to us. They really make or break our work.

Melt at exact temperatures and measure more than just temp.They melt at the right time with time and temperature work on them. That isthey melt with the time it takes to get to a given temperature. Which effects the glaze melt-faster fires melt it less slower rises melt it more. Only cones reflect this factor and melt accordingly.

We take these little things for granted but they really arefantastic

I have been lucky enough to have a huge collection of cones mainly from buying out 3-4 potters who thru in the towel years ago. Also back in the day (1971) was told to throw away all the old cones from the university clay shed I worked in from the 50’s.Those cones missed the dumpster and ended up in use. I have given boxes of extras to our now defunct ceramics guild members over the years.

No matter if you use pre made pads or self supporting or youare like me and always make your own pads.

Next time you place a cone consider what they really do.



I have my cones organized by those used every week and those needed only rarely. I do not use cones for bisque in car kiln anymore and only use two cones per glaze fire-cone ^10/^11 .I’m not suggesting this for anyone. Us old times have our own ways

It is suggested to put 3 cones in with your main cone being the middle cone in pack. This is good practice

Melted cones in the photo are ^10’s and ^11’s.

Get to coning.

Mark


I don't use cones either in my bisque. Color temperature for me is close enough for a bisque load. I do use a 3 cone pack for my glaze firings, and only one of them. Over the years I have come to know the cone pretty well so that my firings are even from top to bottom. I don't have automation or a sitter so all of it is by feel. Not that I reach inside!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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