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So Lost, help with glaze mixing!


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#1 DMCosta

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 11:15 AM

I am trying to order my raw chemicals online to make my own glazes and I've noticed a lot of them have more than one type, whereas the recipe itself doesn't specify. The following chemicals have a lot of variations and I am unsure which to buy: Flint (which I believe is Silica), Feldspar, Bentonite, Rutile, calcium borate (I think Ferro Frit 3195 may work) all have many types. Can anyone recommend any books etc. that can help? I am making all low fire oxidation glazes. Feeling very overwhelmed and concerned I'll buy/use the wrong one when I go to mix my glazes.

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:21 PM

Yes, you have to stop first and do some reading but it is not as awful as it seems at first!! It's like baking a cake ... what a difference it makes if you know the difference between flour and salt.

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#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:05 PM

there are many good books
what temperature are you using?
Mastering Cone 6 Glazes is good
Michael bailey's Cone 6 glazes
John Britts articles and blog spot on glaze sharing

Marcia

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:06 PM

Making your own glazes will take a good understanding of all the materials-As noted above take the time to read and understand the whole process-This is a slow process and mistakes will be part of the learning curve.Start out with small test batches and fire them before making large batches. Learn as much 1st from books or better yet from a class if available .Its a big jump from commercial glazes to making glazes without understanding all the materials.Even if you do understand them its a big jump.
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#5 DMCosta

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:34 PM

Hi Marcia,

I am using cone 06 glazes recipes for low fire clay. I did see the books you listed but they all seemed to be for cone 6. Thank you for all your help everyone!

~Dianna

there are many good books
what temperature are you using?
Mastering Cone 6 Glazes is good
Michael bailey's Cone 6 glazes
John Britts articles and blog spot on glaze sharing

Marcia



#6 Tom

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 01:15 AM

What are the Recipes you are using. This may help us direct you to the right starting point. But doing your own research is best and test the glazes until they fit right and hold up over time. Some glazes can start to craze as much as a year or two after firing.

Tom

#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 06:11 AM

My predecessor has the walls covered with ^04 test tiles..some are very nice. I may copy some while I fire the big car kiln today.
Will post a few.
Marcia

#8 TJR

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 10:34 AM

DMCosta;
Start with some 100 gram tests. All recipes are listed as a percentage of 100. You mix them up in a disposable coffee cup, label the back of the test with iron oxide or a glaze pencil. Make careful labels of each test and fire them. Don't forget to sieve your glaze before applying it to the tile. Tiles should be bisqued first. Mixing your own glazes is a big step.Is there a class you can take in your area?
TJR.

#9 neilestrick

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 11:04 AM

glad makes reusable plastic containers that fit 100g batches nicely. empty sour cream, cottage cheese, yogurt containers work in a pinch. old coffee cans and peanut butter jars come in handy too.


I often use Solo cups if I'm doing a large triaxial blend or a lot of tests at once.
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#10 Nelly

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 03:59 PM


glad makes reusable plastic containers that fit 100g batches nicely. empty sour cream, cottage cheese, yogurt containers work in a pinch. old coffee cans and peanut butter jars come in handy too.


I often use Solo cups if I'm doing a large triaxial blend or a lot of tests at once.






Here is a good how-to glaze mixing video that may be of help.



I do agree, it is as easy as mixing a cake. You just have to learn the ingredients.

I like to assemble everything first. I also try to work through any ingredients I am not knowledgeable from the onset (i.e., your situation with the silica...phone of find out what they sent you and if it is something you can substitute in your recipe). Start, as mentioned with small batches. Put small cookies under the glaze tests if you are unsure about how they will react. You will need a weigh scale and good respirator. Big bowl. Water. I like to seive but some prefer the drill to mix ingredients. I know, also, ceramic arts daily has a download on cone 4 recipes that maybe helpful to you. Good luck.

Nellie

#11 DMCosta

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:43 PM

Thank you everyone for your continued help with my glaze mixing issues! I got my earthenware recipes from "The Potters Book of Glaze Recipes" from Emmanuel Copper so I'd assume they're probably somewhat reliable. The book however is british so I think that's partially my problem because the names of the materials listed for the recipe differ slightly than what's available here. Although I live in a busy suburban area, there aren't any glaze mixing classes by my house, hence why I have my own studio because there aren't many ceramic studios either. I have been a potter for years so I am aware of the fundamentals of clay but mixing of glazes I have little to no experience with. Once again I appreciate the help and welcome any additional suggestions anyone has, thank you!

#12 Kabe

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:41 PM

DMCosta;
Start with some 100 gram tests. All recipes are listed as a percentage of 100. You mix them up in a disposable coffee cup, label the back of the test with iron oxide or a glaze pencil. Make careful labels of each test and fire them. Don't forget to sieve your glaze before applying it to the tile. Tiles should be bisqued first. Mixing your own glazes is a big step.Is there a class you can take in your area?
TJR.


I posted something about this one other time. It has been a godsent for me. when you mix up you 100 gram batch, write the name or mumber on a plastic spoon and leave it in the container. when it comes time to do more testing or to add it to a larger batch you will not have a bunch of unmarked containers. just a marked spoon with the glaze stuck to it. If I am done with the glaze I put the spoon and the dry glaze in a sandwich bag so I can have it if I want to do more tests later. you can add water and see how a glaze will look if it is put over the top of another. saves having to mix up a new batch. the iron oxide works good. I add it to wet bentonite and it works about like an ink the iron stay suspended instead of stuck to the bottom. Happy firing Kabe




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