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Nelly

Commercial product review--Can I post this?

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Nelly    16

Dear All,

 

I am not sure if I can review a product on this site but thought I would try anyway to see where it goes and/or if anyone else has tried this glaze.

 

I have just used two Potter's Choice glazes on my platters. Fired to cone 6. Application methods researched thoroughly. Salt Buff and Saturated Iron were the colors used. Applied directly to the body with some overlapping and changes of painting stroke direction as indicated on the instructions.

 

I put the salt buff which is supposed to look like a salt fire glaze on a mixed red/white mid-range fire clay body. It look okay. Just okay. I thought with the mixed color surface it would have some interesting effects but nada. Sort of looked like one of those older chesterfields that were beige and gold flecked. The kind made with solid polyester material from the 80's.

 

The saturated iron, which they say to put on in a thick manner in different directions is, I think, as they say something you have to learn to use. On some areas of my platters I could see the gold really coming through. On others, it appeared as a simple flat black.

 

Will I use them again? Yes. They were very easy to apply and did not require as much clean-up as say using the pouring and dipping methods of regular glaze.

 

I think it is a matter of learning what they can do. I did even try to overlap as they suggest with some interesting effects but none that I am over the moon with excitement about.

 

I had no blistering or pin holing in anything fired-- believe it or not.

 

The matt glaze that I know and mixed myself turned out perfectly. Puuurfect!!! I know this glaze well. I know how far I can push it and what it will do with with different oxides and other known glazes that are mixed from dry ingredients.

 

So what is the bottom line with my review...???

 

I like the commercial products but will likely use them as additions to my repertoire of decorating tools. They will become useful for accents only. Not full coverage. I will stick to the dip and pour glazes I know. I will use slips and oxide colorants primarily and will look to these products as fun extra experiments.

 

That's it folks. While a tiny bit disappointed with the results, I will not despair. I will gently do some retouching and fire a cone down to see if there is any huge changes. What is it they say when you first learn to work with clay--"it is only clay."

 

Nellie

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Lucille Oka    16

What is the number of the glaze you call 'Saturation Iron'? There is a PC-1 Saturation Metallic and PC-2 Saturation Gold, there is PC-33 Iron Lustre, and PC-36 Ironstone.

The Potter's Choice glazes thrill me; especially the layering techniques which are absolutely beautiful.

The layering techniques they suggest for the PC-1 Saturation Metallic, is over PC 59 Deep Fire Brick, or over PC 12 Blue Midnight, or over PC-29 Deep Olive Speckle. The combination they suggest for PC-2 Saturation Gold is over PC-12 Blue Midnight. The combinations they suggest for PC-60 Salt Buff are over PC-59 Deep fire Brick, or over PC-12 Blue Midnight, or over PC-29 Deep Olive Speckle.

If you want layering combinations for the other glazes mentioned above you can go to the Amaco website- http://www.amaco.com...g-amaco-glazes/ and see them all for yourself.

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teardrop    2

We chose these glazes to use on our klunkery...beginners that we are and all. We probably bought too many colors...but again...we're beginners! "Confusion, will be my epitath.." KC

 

The Saturation gold needs to be applied thickly. Too thin (from our experience so far) and you will get a jet black. A bit thicker and you will see the metallic start to come into play.

 

In fact, all of these glazes need to be applied fairly generously from what we are seeing. Fun stuff!

 

good luck finding the magic

 

teardrop

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Nelly    16

Can you upload pictures?

 

 

Dear All,

 

Thank you all for the replies. I did not apply them super thickly but will in the future. As for the images, believe it or not, I still use an old Nikon and only shoot black and white. No digital yet. I should get one though to share.

 

I am encouraged to hear that the glazes do work to some degree (i.e., from what I am reading in these posts). And yes, I did make a mistake. Saturated gold is what I used.

 

My hope was to come up with something I used in my old studio called " gold dust." It was an oxide creation but I do not have the recipe and the woman who made this has since passed away. If any of you know of how to create simple gold fleck accents with little trouble except some oxides, do let me know.

 

I have searched on the Internet for "gold dust" but have been unable to find a recipe.

 

Anyway, thank you all for the replies.

 

I think I will simply order a few of the recipes I am familiar with from my old studio.

 

Nellie

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teardrop    2

We are finding that all of the PC glazes need to be applied liberally.

 

I took a couple of pics of the saturation gold and the variations we are seeing with thicker/thinner coats. (please ignore the noob klunkery we used as testers)

 

The smaller star peice has 3 good coats inside (more gold color)...2 on the outside (looks almost identical to an old penny).

 

The larger peice has 3 coats on the center star/peices radiating out.

 

One coat of Saturation Gold ranges from dark to BLACK in our tests on b-mix. Beware.

 

good luck

 

teardrop

post-8561-133416753565_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133416754827_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133416753565_thumb.jpg

post-8561-133416754827_thumb.jpg

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Nelly    16

We are finding that all of the PC glazes need to be applied liberally.

 

I took a couple of pics of the saturation gold and the variations we are seeing with thicker/thinner coats. (please ignore the noob klunkery we used as testers)

 

The smaller star peice has 3 good coats inside (more gold color)...2 on the outside (looks almost identical to an old penny).

 

The larger peice has 3 coats on the center star/peices radiating out.

 

One coat of Saturation Gold ranges from dark to BLACK in our tests on b-mix. Beware.

 

good luck

 

 

Dear Teardrop,

 

Thank you sooo much for these images. I had one really true color of gold on my platters. The rest were pretty dark. So, at least I know it can be done. I will just keep playing with them as I said, as accents only.

 

Thank you for taking the time to send off these images.

 

Nellie

 

teardrop

 

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