Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Humping


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 two dog

two dog

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 03 June 2010 - 10:44 AM

Hi

This is my first post; so I am not sure if this subject is in the correct catagory.

I can throw off a hump but I cannot figure out how to get the repeated vessel to the desired outside height which includes the foot. The shape, inside depth, and diameter of lip and base of the vessel -exclusive of the foot- are no problem. However, when cutting the vessel from the hump, I cannot gauge how much clay to leave for shaping the foot. Of course, ideally, one should be able to cut the vessel from the hump without leaveing an exacessive of raw clay to be trimmed.

Can anyone give a clear word picture on what and how to do? TJ

#2 hansen

hansen

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • LocationAlexandria, Virginia

Posted 08 June 2010 - 07:08 AM

The dirt cheap answer on this is that - if the form you are making is meant to be held in the hands - then it is the hands which must determine how much physical mass of clay above the proposed trim line responds to the needs of the hands. Remember you need to triple-compress the bottom of that form!!! Consider that the process of trimming the foot to be a separate design, you are wedding two designs together. Your customers are getting twice their money's worth. When you trim you foot remember to "feel out" the form before you start cutting. Usually works for me.
h a n s e n

Hi

This is my first post; so I am not sure if this subject is in the correct catagory.

I can throw off a hump but I cannot figure out how to get the repeated vessel to the desired outside height which includes the foot. The shape, inside depth, and diameter of lip and base of the vessel -exclusive of the foot- are no problem. However, when cutting the vessel from the hump, I cannot gauge how much clay to leave for shaping the foot. Of course, ideally, one should be able to cut the vessel from the hump without leaveing an exacessive of raw clay to be trimmed.

Can anyone give a clear word picture on what and how to do? TJ




h a n s e n
Stone House Studio, Alexandria, Virginia

americanpotter.blogspot.com
thesuddenschool.blogspot.com

#3 Togeika

Togeika

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • LocationMinneapolis, MN USA

Posted 28 June 2010 - 03:45 PM

Hi

This is my first post; so I am not sure if this subject is in the correct catagory.

I can throw off a hump but I cannot figure out how to get the repeated vessel to the desired outside height

Can anyone give a clear word picture on what and how to do? TJ


TJ,

I throw with a tombo (dragon fly) measuring gauge. It gives me the lip diameter and the inside depth. If you hold the gauge so the inside stick is on the outside of the vessel (yunomi for instance), the bottom of that gauge will tell you where the inside bottom is. If you are not trimming, allow around 1/4" more than the inside depth. If you will trim a foot, also ad that (if your foot is 1/4" tall, you need at least 1/2" on the outside, but you can leave a little more, incase you don't cut the bottom off straight. When trimming the foot, you can always err on the side of "extra."

Good luck!
--
Lee Love in Minneapolis
http://www.facebook.com/togeika
http://mingeisota.blogspot.com/

"Ta tIr na n-óg ar chul an tI—tIr dlainn trina chéile"—that is, "The land of eternal youth is behind the house, a beautiful land fluent within itself." -- John O'Donohue

#4 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,833 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 13 July 2010 - 10:44 PM


Hi

This is my first post; so I am not sure if this subject is in the correct catagory.

I can throw off a hump but I cannot figure out how to get the repeated vessel to the desired outside height

Can anyone give a clear word picture on what and how to do? TJ


TJ,

I throw with a tombo (dragon fly) measuring gauge. It gives me the lip diameter and the inside depth. If you hold the gauge so the inside stick is on the outside of the vessel (yunomi for instance), the bottom of that gauge will tell you where the inside bottom is. If you are not trimming, allow around 1/4" more than the inside depth. If you will trim a foot, also ad that (if your foot is 1/4" tall, you need at least 1/2" on the outside, but you can leave a little more, incase you don't cut the bottom off straight. When trimming the foot, you can always err on the side of "extra."

Good luck!


When I am throwing off the hump, I begin my making the small center lump and then mark the potential bottom of the pot with a finger mark.
I then finish throwing the form, . I use a pointed modeling stick to cut the foot and finish cutting it off with a wire. I take practice to repeated get the same size.
Use extra compression moves as one person suggests. I use the hump method for small pots, tea bowls, and teapots throwing the spouts, lids and then body of teapots.





#5 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,991 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 15 September 2010 - 06:46 PM



Hi

This is my first post; so I am not sure if this subject is in the correct catagory.

I can throw off a hump but I cannot figure out how to get the repeated vessel to the desired outside height

Can anyone give a clear word picture on what and how to do? TJ


TJ,

I throw with a tombo (dragon fly) measuring gauge. It gives me the lip diameter and the inside depth. If you hold the gauge so the inside stick is on the outside of the vessel (yunomi for instance), the bottom of that gauge will tell you where the inside bottom is. If you are not trimming, allow around 1/4" more than the inside depth. If you will trim a foot, also ad that (if your foot is 1/4" tall, you need at least 1/2" on the outside, but you can leave a little more, incase you don't cut the bottom off straight. When trimming the foot, you can always err on the side of "extra."

Good luck!


When I am throwing off the hump, I begin my making the small center lump and then mark the potential bottom of the pot with a finger mark.
I then finish throwing the form, . I use a pointed modeling stick to cut the foot and finish cutting it off with a wire. I take practice to repeated get the same size.
Use extra compression moves as one person suggests. I use the hump method for small pots, tea bowls, and teapots throwing the spouts, lids and then body of teapots.





I start my hump throwing by seperating the piece of clay from the rest with a rib mark and finger indent, then I open out flat making a pancake-draw the pancake up to make the form, and finish throwing. When making the pancake the compression is easier, and then drawing up the sides make the clay particle alignment more consistent throughout the pot. I have had problems in the past with the "S" shaped cracking, but no longer since I started this technique. I learned to do it when I took a job for 2000 small containers of 1/2 lb a piece. First few loads were really frustrating. But in the end, I learned a lesson!

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users