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What rutile to get?


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#1 Bobg

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:59 AM

I'm going to be experimenting with a new glaze from John Hesselberth book and it calls for rutile. I get my supplies from the Clay Art Center in Seattle and they have two diifferent ones, one is milled ( thinking this is the one) and the other it says is "ceramic rutile", say's it should be screened before using due to various sized particles. I'm assuming that I need the milled rutile, but wanted to make sure.


Thanks for the help.

Bob

#2 Mark C.

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 10:15 AM

I buy Rutile in 50# bags-just checked bag and it does not say milled anywhere. It must be ceramic grade.
I always screen my glazes anyway.
Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#3 TJR

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:01 AM

You want the fine rutile-probably milled. You can also buy granular Rutile which is used to put "iron" spots in glazes when you fire in an electric kiln.It is a coaser grind and would have to be seived out if you want a smooth glaze
TJR

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:12 PM

I looked up my records-I get my rutile by the 50# bag from Laguna Clay Co.

They sell 3 types

Milled

Ceramic Grade-which is plenty fine

Granular –which looks sort of darkish

I have been using ceramic grade for 30 years as I go thru lots

The brands have changed over the years but its all been ceramic grade for me.

I just check both my bags and they are really fine powder.

Your supplier may have only two kinds

Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#5 Bobg

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 09:34 AM

Thanks for the responses. I'm looking at making a smooth glaze so the milled would work the best. But, I've also been interested in adding to a glaze to add iron spots to it. I think I will buy the ceramic grade and screen it to take out the larger pieces to use later.

Thanks again.

Bobg

#6 TJR

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 10:07 AM

Thanks for the responses. I'm looking at making a smooth glaze so the milled would work the best. But, I've also been interested in adding to a glaze to add iron spots to it. I think I will buy the ceramic grade and screen it to take out the larger pieces to use later.

Thanks again.

Bobg


Bobg;
I don't know if you are familiar with Dansk Pottery. They make a high end stoneware dinner plate in Albany slip colour[brown] and a white matt that has speckles. They are fired in oxidation in an electric kiln. [I think]. Potters add speckles to their glazes to get that stoneware reduction effect. You can use granular rutile, and you can also use granular illmanite. Don't quote me, but I think 2% would give you the effect you are looking for.I do not use these techniques in my own work, but remember them from art school.Good luck.
TJR.




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