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Carbide Trim Tools


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#1 Mark C.

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 01:48 PM

These tools are not for everyone. If you are a hobbyist orjust having fun with clay these are most likely not for you. If you are in ashared tool situation stay away from these. These are only for someone who doeslots of trimming.

If you findyourself buying trim tools buy the gross and going thru them like butter onflapjacks then a carbide tool is what you need.

As a full time studio potter I used to buy kemper R2’s bythe Gross (as they where cheaper). I even at one time bought just the tips and replaced as I went thru them. Kemper no longer sells just the tips. Porcelainis hard on steel trim tools. I tend to use up the curved end sooner than the straightend.

Years ago I found out about Phil at Bison Tools in Las Vegas(he has a web site)-he made me some special double mini ender tools from Carbide. He has many different types. These tools are pricey but last me for years before needing replacement tips. If I recall these were about 100$ each. The single tip ones are about ½ this cost. My go to for many years was a R2 (6inch) from Kemper so I sent him one and he made me these 7 inch ones. I have a few extras so I always have one when I’m getting service on the others or if one gets broke (happened once in 10 years). These carbide tools will break i fthey are dropped or whacked and need to be handled properly. They are fragile tips and are not metal. I keep one at my trimming wheel in a small plastic tube fastened down and only have it in my hand or in the tube. They last thru more pots that one can imagine. I have seen others now make a few shapes as well in carbide.

As noted not for everyone but for the few who need them really a great item. And Phil can custom make what you need.

Mark
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#2 bciskepottery

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 08:26 PM

My wheel instructor uses Bison tools for trimming; he works in either porcelain or Soldate 60. He swears by them. Pricey, yes; worth the investment, absolutely. Can't wait to get my own.

#3 Nelly

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:43 AM

My wheel instructor uses Bison tools for trimming; he works in either porcelain or Soldate 60. He swears by them. Pricey, yes; worth the investment, absolutely. Can't wait to get my own.


Dear All,

I was told by someone who attended NCECA, that they saw a new type of trimming tool presented. They said it was not a Dolan or a Bison. They said it had characteristics that seem in between these two trimming instruments?? My friend did not know the name of this manufacturer. Did anyone see this company at the conference??

Nelly

#4 Pres

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:06 AM



These tools are not for everyone. If you are a hobbyist orjust having fun with clay these are most likely not for you. If you are in ashared tool situation stay away from these. These are only for someone who doeslots of trimming.

If you findyourself buying trim tools buy the gross and going thru them like butter onflapjacks then a carbide tool is what you need.

As a full time studio potter I used to buy kemper R2’s bythe Gross (as they where cheaper). I even at one time bought just the tips andreplaced as I went thru them. Kemper no longer sells just the tips. Porcelainis hard on steel trim tools. I tend to use up the curved end sooner than the straightend.

Years ago I found out about Phil at Bison Tools in Las Vegas(he has a web site)-he made me some special double mini ender tools fromCarbide. He has many different types. These tools are pricey but last me foryears before needing replacement tips. If I recall these were about 100$ each. Thesingle tip ones are about ½ this cost. My go to for many years was a R2 (6inch) from Kemper so I sent him one and he made me this 7 inch ones. I have afew extras so I always have one when I’m getting service on the others or ifone gets broke (happened once in 10 years). These carbide tools will break ifthey are dropped or whacked and need to be handled properly. They are fragiletips and are not metal. I keep one at my trimming wheel in a small plastic tubefastened down and only have it in my hand or in the tube. They last thru morepots that one can imagine. I have seen others now make a few shapes as well incarbide.

As noted not for everyone but for the few who need themreally a great item.

Mark







I use a variety of tools for trim with, from wooden ones that I have made to hack saw types also, along with several different commercial ones. I used to love the old trim jim tool. I have found that I like the open tools better these days than the loop tools for trimming and ease of sharpening. The bison tools look great, and it would be nice to have some, but at that price I'll pass.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 JLowes

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 01:26 PM

I wasn't at NCECA, but have noted that Xiem Studio Tools ( http://store.xiemcla...ools_c_112.html) now markets carbide tools. I know nothing about them, I just saw their ad in PMI or CM magazines recently. They are pricey as well. It looks like you can buy a universal handle and buy what blades you need to use, thus saving the cost of a handle each time you buy a blade. Bison offers a sharpening service, nothing about that on Xiem's site.

John

#6 SShirley

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:09 PM

Mark,

I just had a friend pick me up a Bison tool when when went to NCECA. She gave i to me on Monday and so I played with it some today but am having a hard time avoiding chattering. I'm sure it takes some practice to hold it just right. But I like the fee of it and it really is sharp.

Sylvia

#7 Mark C.

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:10 PM

It may chatter less if the pot is wetter when trimmed.
Mark
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#8 Chris Campbell

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:16 PM

I have two Bison tools that never leave my studio ... I don't even like to share them! Super sharp and very comfortable in the hand. The only other carbide tools I saw at NCECA looked machine/production made ... I prefer Phil's human touch.

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#9 Mark C.

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:32 PM

I heard thru a friend who went that Phil from Bison tools was at NCECA-He makes his all by hand as woodworking is his thing.
Mark
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