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Shoulder Tendonitis/Bursitis


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#21 yedrow

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Posted 25 April 2012 - 10:48 PM

Thanks Pres, I'll look that up. The doc that operated on my hand told me the tendon was in excellent condition, especially after all the cortison shots. She expected to see burs all over it. I really don't see myself as being very old, but that is always a perspective issue, lol. I'm really thinking food and long-term unhealthy posture are the big culprits, but we humans tend too often to believe that we can conjure up remedies from deprivation and self-flagellation; so who knows?

Ack, I just remembered; there is a diclofinac gell called Voltaren that you can use if your stomach can't handle the pill. Come to think of it, there is also a patch that works better than the gell.

Edited by yedrow, 25 April 2012 - 11:10 PM.


#22 ThisIsMelissa

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 06:44 PM

I did end up taking a few weeks off from pottery (throwing anyway).
My shoulder stopped aching. Last week, while working in the garden, I pulled something out of the ground wrong and that night, boom, shoulder pain.
Today, after pottery class.... boom, shoulder pain. With pottery, I notice it mostly when I'm centering anything larger than 4 lbs.


I'm quite aware of ergonomics at the PC. My monitor is sitting on a monitor riser at the right height and my keyboard and mouse are also at good positions. I've been in situations where they've not been good and have suffered. This is certainly not the same.


So, yes, I'm using Dr. Google to diagnose, but I do also have a friend at an orthopedist's office. When I told her about it (before even mentioning being a potter), she said, "sounds like tendonitis to me. Do you do this a lot" and she put her hands in a position as if she were picking something up. ... basically, a potting position. "Yup, I throw pottery on the wheel."

Bottom line, I'm 39 years old and my body is not what it used to be. I need to come to terms with the fact that I'm middle aged and need to start treating injuries properly!

#23 haresdehan

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 06:42 AM

Shoulder bursitis and tendonitis are common causes of shoulder pain and stiffness. They indicate swelling of a particular area within the shoulder joint.The shoulder joint is kept stable by a group of muscles called the rotator cuff as well as the bicipital tendon. When the rotator cuff tendon or the bicipital tendon becomes inflamed and irritated it is called rotator cuff tendonitis or bicipital tendonitis.An area called the subacromial bursa lies in the space between the shoulder tendons. The bursa is what protects these tendons. Subacromial bursitis occurs when the bursa becomes inflamed.Both conditions can cause pain and stiffness around the shoulder and may exist together.


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#24 Isculpt

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 03:12 PM

I suffered from shoulder bursitis and elbow tendonitis at the same time - MAJOR PAIN! I saw an orthopedist, he referred me to a Physical Therapist. I saw the PT perhaps half a dozen sessions with lots of "homework" -- daily exercise and ice packs fitted into my work schedule (which had to continue if I was going to eat and keep a roof over my head). After a few months, I was cured. Although I continued to work as I had before the injury (unavoidable repetitive motions), it is now 20 years later and I've never had a recurrence. There were no shots, no meds. He told me that I was his favorite kind of patient, because my livelihood depended on my following his instructions re ice packs (which I hate!) and doing the exercises as prescribed. Some states don't require the initial referrel to a PT, which can save you some money. Whatever the cost, I ABSOLUTELY believe in physical therapy.Twenty years without a recurrence -- how could I not? I wish you a speedy cure.

#25 Essaily

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 06:36 PM

Know what you mean Melissa, I'm too young too! I've been treating my bursitis with ginger and tumeric - plenty of curries! It's helped a lot as pain is not so frequent now. Recently I found out about fresh pineapple for inflammation, now I hardly ever feel pain any more and can walk without limping.

#26 Pres

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 06:57 PM

I've been treating my bursitis with ginger and tumeric - plenty of curries! It's helped a lot as pain is not so frequent now.


Oh the injuries of getting older! In June I was doing my chin ups, and something ripped. Needless to say several weeks later and many PT sessions I am doing better, but the herniated disk is still there, but I will be returning to the shop-after my thumb heals from the being reacquainted to why I hate hammers and nails while building a kayak rack. The left thumb is pretty messed up. Hope to get in to the shop next week as my clay shipment has arrived and I have orders.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#27 Mark C.

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 07:46 PM

Pres
Heres a tip I learned the hard way

One thing I have found is hammer and nails are now replaced with screws and cordless screw gun-its a lot easier on one than the hammer deal
As one who lives and dies with hand injuries I found this out long ago
I just ordered a new tablesaw and It has all the new safety features and push sticks as we all need our fingers attached and in working shape.
Mark
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#28 yedrow

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 09:13 PM

One thing I have found is hammer and nails are now replaced with screws and cordless screw gun-its a lot easier on one than the hammer deal
As one who lives and dies with hand injuries I found this out long ago


You've got that one right. I built a shed a couple of years ago, for our lawn stuff. I used a hammer on much of it and a weekend of building did a number on the tendons in my arm. Now I use a nail gun or a drill/driver.

Joel.




#29 Chantay

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Posted 09 September 2012 - 08:02 PM

Ack, I just remembered; there is a diclofinac gell called Voltaren that you can use if your stomach can't handle the pill



I've also used this - works wonderful if you can afford it.

Seems like your getting a lot of good advice. I have suffered from the shoulder thing. I was working as a seamstress on sails, 100lb +. I now have arthritis, but not in the shoulder. I would just add, rest, alternate heat and ice and see physical therapist. Another very important thing: If you can take a NSAI such as Ibuprofen, you should take it countinously for about two weeks. Swelling prevents healing. Even after it stops hurting continue the Ibuprofen for awhile to give the joint a chance to continue healing. I learned this the hard way.
- chantay

#30 Pres

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 09:53 PM

Pres
Heres a tip I learned the hard way

One thing I have found is hammer and nails are now replaced with screws and cordless screw gun-its a lot easier on one than the hammer deal
As one who lives and dies with hand injuries I found this out long ago
I just ordered a new tablesaw and It has all the new safety features and push sticks as we all need our fingers attached and in working shape.
Mark


Most of the yak rack was built with screws, One are really needed longer nails-I even predrilled the nail holes. That said-I'll never be a carpenter.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#31 Ravyn

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 02:47 PM


Surely, some of you all suffer from the same issues. Does anyone know any exercises that can help reduce stress on that joint? I'd rather not grow reliant on Advil. I don't like to take meds if I don't have to, and would prefer a more proactive route to helping with this.

Suggestions?


First, find a great orthopedist. I have one and it has made a world of difference for me. You certainly do NOT need surgery if you just have bursitis. A well placed shot of cortisone and physical therapy will do the trick. The trick is to find a great doc. Mine works on the Portland Ballet troupe and a few sports teams. His shots are painless! I can't say the same for other ninnies I have seen. Good luck, do your pt and find an orthopedist that isn't a surgeon!






Actually, you might need surgery. I had to have surgery for bursitis for my shoulder and I am only 16. There is certainly a chance that you might need surgery. Just find a good ortopedist and they will tell you if you need it or not. But there is always a chance.

#32 Angi

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:03 PM

Hi, I had a similar problem, severe shoulder pain,i was diagnosed with a rotator cuff injury. I am a massage therapist, and found it was too deep inside for me to be able to reach / massage. The exersizes my Physiotherapist gave me were unbearable as I could not lift my arm above chest hight. After sleepless nights, and painful days, i was at the end of my tether. I was like a zombie for 6 months. The Physiotherapist said there was not much else that could be done except surgery. I asked if he had a machine that could send deep sonic pulses into where the pain was. We tried this and after the 1st session i slept the night, after 8 sessions I was PAIN FREE and have been for over 12 months now. So please dont have surgery, ask if there is a machine with sonic / sound
waves and give it a go. Hope this helps you xx Painfree Angi.




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