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Ravensara

Which Are Best Mfa Programs In California?

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Ravensara    0

I am looking for advice as to which are the best schools for an MFA in ceramics in California. I am a 34 yr. old student pursuing my BFA in ceramics and painting at East Carolina University in NC. It is my dream to go to California, get my MFA, and make utilitarian vessels and water fountains. I also am considering teaching at the university level. Can anyone help?

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Ravensara    0

I am looking for advice as to which are the best schools for an MFA in ceramics in California. I am a 34 yr. old student pursuing my BFA in ceramics and painting at East Carolina University in NC. It is my dream to go to California, get my MFA, and make utilitarian vessels and water fountains. I also am considering teaching at the university level. Can anyone help?

 

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hansen    3

I am looking for advice as to which are the best schools for an MFA in ceramics in California. I am a 34 yr. old student pursuing my BFA in ceramics and painting at East Carolina University in NC. It is my dream to go to California, get my MFA, and make utilitarian vessels and water fountains. I also am considering teaching at the university level. Can anyone help?

 

I was invited to San Diego State, but I really don't know to much about the place except the Professor, Richard Burkett, was the first potter to open up a major ceramics site for the internet, as well as authoring a fine glaze calculation program, Hyperglaze. I believe he was the first moderator of ClayArt as well.

h a n s e n

 

 

 

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Guest LGHT   
Guest LGHT

It is my dream to go to California, get my MFA, and make utilitarian vessels and water fountains.

 

 

Why do you need a MFA to make vessels and fountains? I know a potter who makes amazing fountains and make a great living without a B or M FA.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

It is my dream to go to California, get my MFA, and make utilitarian vessels and water fountains.

 

 

Why do you need a MFA to make vessels and fountains? I know a potter who makes amazing fountains and make a great living without a B or M FA.

 

 

She also expressed the desire to teach at the University level which requires the MFA certification.

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Guest LGHT   
Guest LGHT

She also expressed the desire to teach at the University level which requires the MFA certification.

 

 

Ohh ok it makes since now to get a MFA. I mean no way can you can make fountains AND teach without one.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I think it is good to pursue your dreams. And while degrees and certifications are not needed to creating functional ware or fountains, in today's world of employment, degrees and certifications are demanded by employers.

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I think it is good to pursue your dreams. And while degrees and certifications are not needed to creating functional ware or fountains, in today's world of employment, degrees and certifications are demanded by employers.

 

 

Pursuing dreams is a wonderful endeavor but on the practical side I believe that a formal education also serves a very valuable purpose. I know that there are excellent artists without formal education but I believe that a formal education also gives one tools that are not otherwise available. My formal education is only partially in the making of ceramics since I majored in Vocational Education as an undergraduate with an emphasis on craft industries but the the historical perspective I obtained from my professors is hard to put a price on. I decided I was not suited to teaching much of anything and so I went back to school and got my MSME (MS in Mechanical Engineering). While my formal education has little to do with my current vocation I still learned things I use daily. I learned critical thinking for one, for another I learned about furnaces and temperature control, I learned how to research subjects and develop my thoughts to provide practical solutions. I believe that a formal education can be very much a short-cut to success as well. I think that while some people are not suited to the academic lifestyle, to categorically write off education is extremely short-sighted.

 

 

regards,

Charles

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JBaymore    1,432

........... While my formal education has little to do with my current vocation I still learned things I use daily. I learned critical thinking for one, .................... I learned how to research subjects and develop my thoughts to provide practical solutions............. . to categorically write off education is extremely short-sighted.

 

 

 

Amen!

 

best,

 

.......................john

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AmeriSwede    5

........... While my formal education has little to do with my current vocation I still learned things I use daily. I learned critical thinking for one, .................... I learned how to research subjects and develop my thoughts to provide practical solutions............. . to categorically write off education is extremely short-sighted.

 

 

 

Amen!

 

best,

 

.......................john

 

 

Ditto from me on that point, as well...

 

Rick

 

 

 

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spring    8

So I do't know if you still need help but I thought I'd try. I'm currently a ceramics student at San Jose State and will be graduating this spring. I'm also 34 and looking to pursue an MFA in Ceramics.

 

SJSU is a great school. I've been here 1 1/2 years and feel that they offer the tools and expertise to really help you grow. Stan Welsh and Monica Van Den Dool are very down to earth, approachable, knowledgeable, and passionate. They also take interest in your personal development and help guide you. Not all teachers do this, trust me.

 

I also have attended San Francisco State and Cal State Long Beach. My experience at SFSU was not great and I wasn't impressed with the facilities or teacher, Jeff Downing. I found him difficult to work with. The studio is much smaller then SJSU and Long Beach, and they have VERY limited funds which really puts a strain on firing and materials.

 

Cal State Long Beach was like clay paradise. I went there about 14 years ago. Tony Marsh is the head of the department and a really cool guy. He is an insane potter and apprenticed with a Japanese master for three years, so that could be really helpful for you. Jean Peirre Laroque was the handbuilding teacher when I was there, but I don't know who is doing it now. Since i was there, they remodeled the facilities and added a lot of extra space (but I liked it the way it was). They also go on a field trip once a year. The year I was there we went to NYC and met Garth Clark and checked out his gallery, I know another year they went to China.

 

I also live down the street from California College of the Arts. I was just there checking out the studio and talking to Arthur Gonzalez, the department head. His work is amazing but totally not the dirction you are going. The studio is cool and is ok sized but it is pretty expensive to go there.

 

Hope this was helpful and if you have any questions I would be happy to help.

 

Spring

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Thanks, I will look into that. Are there any particular reasons you recomended those cities? Any schools in particular?

 

 

 

 

 

 

I look at the quality of the professors work, their resume and the students they turn out.

 

 

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So I do't know if you still need help but I thought I'd try. I'm currently a ceramics student at San Jose State and will be graduating this spring. I'm also 34 and looking to pursue an MFA in Ceramics.

 

SJSU is a great school. I've been here 1 1/2 years and feel that they offer the tools and expertise to really help you grow. Stan Welsh and Monica Van Den Dool are very down to earth, approachable, knowledgeable, and passionate. They also take interest in your personal development and help guide you. Not all teachers do this, trust me.

 

I also have attended San Francisco State and Cal State Long Beach. My experience at SFSU was not great and I wasn't impressed with the facilities or teacher, Jeff Downing. I found him difficult to work with. The studio is much smaller then SJSU and Long Beach, and they have VERY limited funds which really puts a strain on firing and materials.

 

Cal State Long Beach was like clay paradise. I went there about 14 years ago. Tony Marsh is the head of the department and a really cool guy. He is an insane potter and apprenticed with a Japanese master for three years, so that could be really helpful for you. Jean Peirre Laroque was the handbuilding teacher when I was there, but I don't know who is doing it now. Since i was there, they remodeled the facilities and added a lot of extra space (but I liked it the way it was). They also go on a field trip once a year. The year I was there we went to NYC and met Garth Clark and checked out his gallery, I know another year they went to China.

 

I also live down the street from California College of the Arts. I was just there checking out the studio and talking to Arthur Gonzalez, the department head. His work is amazing but totally not the dirction you are going. The studio is cool and is ok sized but it is pretty expensive to go there.

 

Hope this was helpful and if you have any questions I would be happy to help.

 

Great comment. The personalities of the 5 are also another major reason to choose a school. What kind of fit are you. Water fountains may be a turn off ... Anyway, Stan, Monica, Tony, Jean Peirre and Arthur are all great!!!

 

Spring

 

 

 

 

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