Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I was given boxes of commercial manufactured ready to paint bisque pieces.  I teach middle school art and want to use this bisque in class, but how do I determine what cone I need to fire to?  What will happen if its ^05 and I fire it to ^6?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a kiln full of C05 fired to C5,  the pots were melted into a puddle and ruined the shelves.     You could put a small bisque piece in a tray to test fire a C6 glaze,  it is probably C05 clay.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you have a Paint your own Pottery store nearby, you can ask if they will look at some of the pieces to see if they recognize them.   there are not that many manufacturers of molds and the normal kind found all over the US is fired at 06 for both bisque and glaze.    as a precaution, never fire to cone 6 unless you know the source of the work to be fired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For potters, bisque is always done at low fire temps, from cone 08-03. If you go hotter, the clay will begin to vitrify and won't be porous enough to accept glaze easily.

Most commercial slip cast bisque is made of low fire clay. You'll be bisque firing and glaze firing to cone 05/04. If you fire it up to cone 5/6, it will melt and ruin your kiln shelves and possible the kiln, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, neilestrick said:

For potters, bisque is always done at low fire temps, from cone 08-03. If you go hotter, the clay will begin to vitrify and won't be porous enough to accept glaze easily.

Most commercial slip cast bisque is made of low fire clay. You'll be bisque firing and glaze firing to cone 05/04. If you fire it up to cone 5/6, it will melt and ruin your kiln shelves and possible the kiln, too.

Or if you're like me, someone does that, and you get a cheap kiln out of the deal...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Highly likely it's low fire.  Paint your own is rarely for functional ware, therefore it's  not worth spending extra on high fire slip. 

As above, test a piece by firing it on a lipped tray or saucer made from high fire clay.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.