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MisterP

Does a glow in the dark lustre exist?

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Don't know about lustres, but there was a flurry of interest in "glow in the dark" glazes some years
ago.  I even saw small quantities of the phosphors for sale, with low-fire glaze recipes. Sadly a quick
look didn't find anything currently available on the retail market. Probably a fair amount available
wholesale from China!

Like most "luminous" substances they probably require some exposure to sunlight/UV to "charge" them.

A few urls to give you the idea:
https://ceramicartsnetwork.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/cmjja04glowingglaze.pdf
http://www.potters.org/subject94692.htm
http://www.gtamart.com/mart/products/phspgmnt/glaze.html
http://www.luminggroup.com/english/product/index.asp?sid=165&sel_id=151&sel_id_02=165
 

There seem to be other pigments (perhaps glazes) that simply glow under UV light.
https://www.darkniteglow.com/product/uv-light-reactive-powder/

Regards, Peter

PS A search with a more scientific terminology "photoluminescent glasses" found
https://tinyurl.com/y2aw55bo
The ones based on strontium aluminate may well work in a  low-fire glaze which doesn't dissolve it.
... wiki gives "temperatures above 1090 °C is likely to cause loss of its phosphorescent properties"

Vaguely relevant paper https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/6ecd/665a0fcfe721fd4431e40583faac200e80fc.pdf
... which unfortunately doesn't seem to say what glaze they used, nor why they mixed it with alcohol rather than water.

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When I was in grad school I knew Brian Jensen, who developed the glow in the dark glaze in those links. It was pretty cool stuff. I've still got a little fired sample here in my studio. You have to charge it with light, then it glows, just like glow in the dark stickers. It really glows well, too. Bright stuff.

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This  paper discusses a low-fire glaze for strontium aluminate based pigments. https://tinyurl.com/yyvafwbl

Bottom line is 80% borax, 10% potash feldspar & 10% kaolin.

Consistent with my suspicion that high-alkali glazes might be best avoided as they might attack phosphor grains.

Presumably needs reformulation ... non-soluble ...  frit based.

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6 hours ago, PeterH said:

This  paper discusses a low-fire glaze for strontium aluminate based pigments. https://tinyurl.com/yyvafwbl

Bottom line is 80% borax, 10% potash feldspar & 10% kaolin.

Consistent with my suspicion that high-alkali glazes might be best avoided as they might attack phosphor grains.

Presumably needs reformulation ... non-soluble ...  frit based.

Peter,  

From what I have read the "solubility" issue is that the "strontium aluminate based pigments" must NOT be soluble in the melt.  Aqueous solubility probably is also important, for if the pigment is dissolved in water, the doped crystals may not reform as doped crystals on drying and therefore will not available for storing the energy need to produce the "glow" (that would answer your earlier question "why they mixed it with alcohol rather than water"). 

Am I close or way off base in my understanding? 

LT

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2 hours ago, Magnolia Mud Research said:

Peter,  

From what I have read the "solubility" issue is that the "strontium aluminate based pigments" must NOT be soluble in the melt.  Aqueous solubility probably is also important, for if the pigment is dissolved in water, the doped crystals may not reform as doped crystals on drying and therefore will not available for storing the energy need to produce the "glow" (that would answer your earlier question "why they mixed it with alcohol rather than water"). 

Am I close or way off base in my understanding? 

LT

You are absolutely right, I very much doubt that doped crystals could reconstitute themselves, even if the firing conditions were ideal for
recrystallization of the host crystal itself.

Regards, Peter

The "why they mixed it with alcohol rather than water" point I'm less clear on. I mentioned it in case anybody else could spot it's significance
(if any). As you bring the point up I'll elaborate on my position.

I didn't believe that strontium aluminate was water soluble, but I couldn't find a handy reference giving an actual number. I did find several
data-sheets claiming that it was insoluble in water -- but also one that suggested that is was soluble in water. However use of water-based
media such as acrylic seems to be recommended for the pigments. So my current belief is that water solubility just isn't an issue.

I suspect that the chemists used alcohol-based techniques in the preparation of the glaze because (in their line of work):
- It's what they are used to doing (accuracy and reproducibility are important to them, so tried-and-tested is rightly valued)
- You can evaporate alcohol easily, especially with a mild vacuum (time is money)
- The cost, H&S and waste-disposal issues are insignificant in a lab context

But that's probably because it's the only vaguely plausible explanation I can come up with.

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