Jump to content
liambesaw

Monotyping ink or technique?

Recommended Posts

I've seen a lot of monotyping articles and blog posts, but I haven't quite nailed down exactly what they're using for the ink.  Some say slip, some say underglaze, but I know that it can't be just that.  I'm using the smallest xiem needle on my slip trailer and it gums up and runs as I'm using it.  It's also really hard to draw with!  

Just wondering what people are using with it, both the technique and the medium.  So far the ink I use is black underglaze, mason stain (best black), glycerin and veegum-t.   Works fairly ok, but still wants to flow straight out.  I don't want to thicken it up much more because it's already like snot in the trailer and if I get it much thicker I think I'll run into issues with clogging.

 

IMG_20190804_214432-1209x1612.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seriously, though, My students who do paper transfers just use a slip trailer and underglaze or Stroke-n-Coat. I think there's just a limit to how thin a line you can get with that method. Also try different types of paper. The more absorbent the paper, the less it will run out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@liambesaw, any chance you have a laser printer? I've done fairly fine lines using a reverse image (black toner for what I don't want to come through with the underglaze application) and leaving the lines you want to be black underglaze as plain white unprinted paper. Print off the image with as dark a black as your printer allows, you want a lot of toner on the paper. Brush diluted underglaze over the unprinted lines, the toner repels the underglaze. When the underglaze is bone dry dampen the back side of the paper with a wet sponge then flip it right side up and allow it time for the water to wet the underglaze then use it as a regular underglaze transfer. Damp sponge and rib it onto the pot / slab. I did have to do a bit of clean up of the underglaze but it works pretty well.

edit: would waxing over the leatherhard greenware then using a needle tool or pin to draw the images then brushing black underglaze over be an option?

Edited by Min

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard of the laser printer resist, I'll have to give that a shot.  I have a laser printer even!

Mishima is fun and all, but super labor intensive, I was just making a bunch of basically monotype decals I can store and use when the moment strikes.  I can bang out like 30 of these an hour this way, I was thinking of trying silk screening but I don't really have room for a setup right now.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The finest line i have ever achieved  is with an exacto knife. From a potters video online.  It sorta is the Mishima technique but quicker.

Brush on wax resist. Wait for it to dry well. Then draw your lines with the exacto brush. Then brush on underglaze and wipe off. Super easy and quick (if you don’t count the waiting time). One time i spent hours doing Mishima with different colored slip. Swore never again till I learnt to play with wax resist. 

however drawing with an exacto knife is not easy because of its flatness. It still does a finer line that a sharp needle.

I prefer layering. I prefer thick and thin line. I prefer drawing with a brush though. Though i have yet to find a good brush without spending oodles of dollars. Am thinking of making some from my friend’’s dog. It is so hard to find a sumi brush that has a point. 

Edited by preeta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.