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mrpeders

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mrpeders    1

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

 

I found the youtube video by Michael Wendt. "Stack and Slam Wire Wedging"

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Christine    4

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

 

Most of my studio furniture (but not the slabroller) is on wheels - including glaze buckets which stand on pieces of wood with a caster on each corner (home-made). I use a decorator's mixer attached to an electric drill to stir glazes, and a domestic hand blender to mix small quantities of glaze. I have a stool with a back support at just the right height for my worktop .... and a comfy chair and CD player in my "creative corner"

 

Christine

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Pres    896

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

A few other things that may help you out. Instead of rolling out your slabs, try cutting them with a cutting wire and some form of harp or wooden block set up. A bartenders blender works really well for mixing up small batches of slip, engobes and glazes. Many times the tools that you use can be modified for easier use-angled handles on needle tools and knives, smaller lighter paddles etc. All of these techniques have helped handicapped students I have had in the past, but amazingly enough for many of these students, modification of tools allowed them to start, and then as their strength improved they were able to do much more in the studio and in life.

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Kabe    7

So many tasks, done in my past. I now in pain review and wonder why I chose brute strength and left my brain unused.

There are a lot of tasks that can be out thought and an easier way can be found. Two smaller buckets hold as much as a big one and wiegh half as much. Aint Clay Fun Kabe

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Nightshade    0

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

 

I too have problems with strength and energy due to health reasons, so I understand . Tell me, what is the slash and smash technique? I'd really appreciate it. I'm also looking for information along these lines so any little bit helps.

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Pres    896

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

 

I too have problems with strength and energy due to health reasons, so I understand . Tell me, what is the slash and smash technique? I'd really appreciate it. I'm also looking for information along these lines so any little bit helps.

 

 

Place the clay to be wedged as in a block-cut one "bread slice at a time" and throw on top of each other. Variations on this would include using two blocks, one with wetter clay, one drier-or spraying water between layers. Messy, but once you cut and slam-then re-block clay and put on different face and repeat. do this several times to wedge the block. Hope this makes sense.

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mrpeders    1

I'm wondering if there are tricks that you know that would help a older or handicapped potter who has less strength. I just discovered the slash and smash technique of wedging clay which seems much less taxing. Any ideas?

 

 

 

I too have problems with strength and energy due to health reasons, so I understand . Tell me, what is the slash and smash technique? I'd really appreciate it. I'm also looking for information along these lines so any little bit helps.

 

 

 

I found the youtube video by Michael Wendt. "Stack and Slam Wire Wedging"

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Kabe    7

This Stack and slam method is a way to reclaim clay when it is just a little to dry to wedge. If you slice it and spray it with water or even dip it in water and do the same to the next piece. stack them up and let it set in a bag and it will soften your clay back up. like prez said it can be messy.

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Nightshade    0

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

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Pres    896

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

 

 

 

Working with the clay has benefits to the body, but can also be detrimental. That is why I workout with a total gym type machine, do push ups, pull ups, and a device the strengthens the wrists. It is quite simply a short section of broom handle with a rope attached in the middle with a weight on the end. Every other day I lift the weight by rolling the rope around the handle with my hands held at arms length on either end of the rope turning the handle to raise the weight. Helps a lot to use the muscles in other ways. I also exercise because I am a PWD T2 on no medication. At 62 you have to do anything you can to keep from losing your strength-I still have a lot of big pots in me!

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Lucille Oka    16

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

 

 

 

I mix and wedge alot 'today', (humps and single cones) and throw 'tomorrow'. There is no rule that says you must throw immediately after wedging. Just wrap the wedged clay well in plastic, go relax and drink a cup of tea. Tomorrow when you prepare to throw it feels so much better to have done the prep.

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Nightshade    0

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

 

 

 

Working with the clay has benefits to the body, but can also be detrimental. That is why I workout with a total gym type machine, do push ups, pull ups, and a device the strengthens the wrists. It is quite simply a short section of broom handle with a rope attached in the middle with a weight on the end. Every other day I lift the weight by rolling the rope around the handle with my hands held at arms length on either end of the rope turning the handle to raise the weight. Helps a lot to use the muscles in other ways. I also exercise because I am a PWD T2 on no medication. At 62 you have to do anything you can to keep from losing your strength-I still have a lot of big pots in me!

 

 

 

I wish it were as simple as that for me. I have had Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, as well as some other things, for the past 4 years. Not fun! I basically have a set am out of energy per day. If I push it too hard, my body shuts down. I've learned to balance it out over time and know when to quit. Right now other people wedge my clay for me lol. I like being independent as much as possible, so that's why I'm asking for help. I appreciate the advice though. Thanks! :)

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Pres    896

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

 

 

 

Working with the clay has benefits to the body, but can also be detrimental. That is why I workout with a total gym type machine, do push ups, pull ups, and a device the strengthens the wrists. It is quite simply a short section of broom handle with a rope attached in the middle with a weight on the end. Every other day I lift the weight by rolling the rope around the handle with my hands held at arms length on either end of the rope turning the handle to raise the weight. Helps a lot to use the muscles in other ways. I also exercise because I am a PWD T2 on no medication. At 62 you have to do anything you can to keep from losing your strength-I still have a lot of big pots in me!

 

 

 

I wish it were as simple as that for me. I have had Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, as well as some other things, for the past 4 years. Not fun! I basically have a set am out of energy per day. If I push it too hard, my body shuts down. I've learned to balance it out over time and know when to quit. Right now other people wedge my clay for me lol. I like being independent as much as possible, so that's why I'm asking for help. I appreciate the advice though. Thanks! :)

 

 

At this point the only thing that comes to mind in your case is out of an old Clint Eastwood movie ". . . we shall endeavor to persevere." Good luck, each day one at a time. If I come up with anymore thoughts I will send them your way here.

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deHues    3

I set a canvas covered heavy board on the floor, then kneel on a firm cushion and wedge using my body weight more than muscles. I'm 65 and find this way of wedging much easier. I also agree that wedging can be done at a different time than throwing.

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Nightshade    0

Messy is fine with me. It's just frustrating to be done wedging your clay, then be too fatigued to do anything with it lol. Any other tips on anything else?

 

 

 

Working with the clay has benefits to the body, but can also be detrimental. That is why I workout with a total gym type machine, do push ups, pull ups, and a device the strengthens the wrists. It is quite simply a short section of broom handle with a rope attached in the middle with a weight on the end. Every other day I lift the weight by rolling the rope around the handle with my hands held at arms length on either end of the rope turning the handle to raise the weight. Helps a lot to use the muscles in other ways. I also exercise because I am a PWD T2 on no medication. At 62 you have to do anything you can to keep from losing your strength-I still have a lot of big pots in me!

 

 

 

I wish it were as simple as that for me. I have had Chronic Fatigue and Fibromyalgia, as well as some other things, for the past 4 years. Not fun! I basically have a set am out of energy per day. If I push it too hard, my body shuts down. I've learned to balance it out over time and know when to quit. Right now other people wedge my clay for me lol. I like being independent as much as possible, so that's why I'm asking for help. I appreciate the advice though. Thanks! :)

 

 

At this point the only thing that comes to mind in your case is out of an old Clint Eastwood movie ". . . we shall endeavor to persevere." Good luck, each day one at a time. If I come up with anymore thoughts I will send them your way here.

 

 

 

 

Thanks. It sounds funny but it's been a very very long 28 years of life, and I just keep on truckin!

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Nightshade    0

I set a canvas covered heavy board on the floor, then kneel on a firm cushion and wedge using my body weight more than muscles. I'm 65 and find this way of wedging much easier. I also agree that wedging can be done at a different time than throwing.

 

 

Ooo, that sounds great. Who says those extra pounds get in the way :)

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bciskepottery    925

I've seen pictures of a potter (hand-builder) in England who wedges with his feet . . . and a young guy, too. He puts the clay in a large, thick-mil plastic bag and works it with his feet. A pugmill could help, although they tend to be a bit pricey.

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Christine    4

I've seen pictures of a potter (hand-builder) in England who wedges with his feet . . . and a young guy, too. He puts the clay in a large, thick-mil plastic bag and works it with his feet. A pugmill could help, although they tend to be a bit pricey.

 

 

 

Pity this didn't come with a video, but it might be helpful http://www.potters.org/subject26583.htm/

 

Christine

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