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Digital scale help


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#1 confused_yet_curious

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 02:02 PM

Hi everyone,
I'm drawing an blank, when I'm making an glaze recipe, and I'm using an digital scale, should I use the 0.00 reading or the 0 one? Sorry but I'm seriously am drawing an blank! All commits are welcomed.

#2 neilestrick

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 03:23 PM

Assuming it's reading grams, and you are making a larger batch, like over 1000 grams, there's little reason you should ever need to measure 1/10ths or 1/100ths of a gram. Even at 1/2 of 1%, like for cobalt, you'll still need 5 grams in a 1000 gram batch.
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#3 icyone

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 03:45 PM

It mathematics. If you need to go down to fractions and be more precise use the one with decimal places (0.00) if not use the one without

1 is the same as 1.00 however the first I assume can only go up in increments of whole numbers like 1, 2, 3, etc so you may have something that weighs 1.95 pounds and yet it will still show up as one pound until it reaches 2 pounds

The second one has decimals so you can have the fractions like 1.5 (one and a half) or 2.75 (two and 3 quarters) and so on

so if you need to go with fractions or be more precise go with the second setting that has decimal points 0.00

#4 neilestrick

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 03:55 PM

Unless you are making small test batches, you shouldn't need to measure 1/10ths or 1/100ths of a gram. Even in a 1000 gram batch, 1/2 of 1% will be 5 grams.
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#5 JBaymore

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 07:21 PM

Is you scale one that maybe shows weights in either ounces and pounds and also in grams as options?

If so, it is possible when you see the 0 it is in pounds and ounces mode and when you see 0.00 it is in grams mode. Some scales are like that.

Look at the docs on the scale. And look and see if a little tiny pointer might also show up next to a Pounds or Grams word when you cylce through some of the settings.

best,

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#6 yedrow

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:21 AM

I like to use a scale that gives me at least the same degree of accuracy as glaze recipes(0.00). Most glazes that I've seen give 3 points of accuracy; if you're making 100kg then 22.5kg, or 14.2kg, for instance. If you are mixing 10kg this would change to 2.25kg and 1.42kg. But if you drop to 1000g it would be 225g and 142g. So, you want your scale to have a degree of accuracy relative to the amount you are mixing. My large platform scale measures to the 1/10kg (10g), while my triple beam measures to the 1/10g (10mg). The platform is for mixing production batches, the triple beam is for test batches.




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