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I was going thru an old filing cabinet and found my orginal receipts for my 1st Giffen grip and a letter from Brian the owner thanksing me for buying it. Dated 1984.

I know these are still controversial but for me they are (I own 3 of them now as well as the larger one) just another tool in the tool box the past 35 years

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I understand the view, of those opposed to them, as they see it as a crutch, to a process that potters should know. 

But it is a quick way to center, especially in the bulk, that you are dealing with Mark.  It is also a good way to recenter for decorating.  I just used mine to day, to recenter a leatherhard piece, right side up, to apply even coats of underglaze.  Tap centering that form, right side up, would have been quite difficult.  Plus, the feet hold the ware in place, without leaving clay dust on the outside areas, I already underglazed.

Also, in my classroom, the Giffen Grip is invaluable.  I barely have time to teach the kids to use the wheel to throw the form, so I definitely do not have time to teach them tap centering.  So I can still teach trimming, without that extra step and frustration.  I still talk about tap centering, and show it to them, I just don't expect them to do it.

 

Regardless, tap centering isn't going anywhere.  The Giffen Grip does not work well for altered forms, that aren't symmetrical, and of course, not everyone wants to spend over a hundred bucks, for a Giffen Grip.

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bet the receipt for your giffin grip showed a very small amount of money for such a great tool.    today they cost as much as my first kiln did, with shelves and posts.

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Bought the first one for the HS in mid 80's, and they weren't what I would call cheap back then. . . .the years and popularity  has not really increased the price more than inflation.

IMHO

best,

Pres

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OK I have been cleaning out recieptrs long buried -heres is an up date on Old Westwood ceramics receipts before Laguna bought them out

price of large cones in 9/1977-2.15 cents per box

1975 1# cobalt carb $7.35

9/1977-back when 100# bags where the norm-

#100s of Kingman $6.00

#100 Kentucky ball $6.15

#10 red iron ox. 5.60

Those where the days my friends

 

update bought my second Brent wheel in 4/30/1982 a CXC from Kickwheel Pottery Supply cost delivered $631.70 with splash pan

wheel was $570-splash pan $25 shipping $35.70

 

One last note is I saw an old wholesale tag from 1980 and my ceral bowls where $4 each as well as the mugs.so its all relative .

Edited by Mark C.

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In 1979, I paid $1000 for a catenary 12 cu ft hardbrick kiln and assorted shelves and glazes. 'Course, it had to be mapped, disassembled, hauled across town in an ancient pickup (stop loading when tires distort), bricks cleaned and reassembled. Oh, we were an energetic crew of potters and friends! 

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