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I have been making a two quart open pitcher. I have not figured out how to make them pour, and they tend to drip down the side. Fortunately, most people want them for vases, but I like to have things functional, and would like them to pour.image000000_02.jpg.8959dbaa1f1eb8593fabce0d94af3c4c.jpg

This is one of the first. I have tried a narrower spout, and a more pronounced lip, I haven't tried thinning the lip, mainly for durability. Also I've already changed the handle for better control and aesthetics. Any suggestions

 

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It's hard when you keep a round edge like that.  You can try scraping the glaze off after it's dried just on the spout, so when it fires its more of a sharp edge there that will cut the water off after a pour.  Other than that I am not great at spouts myself but if I don't make a sharp edge on my spouts whether it's tea pots, sake jars or pitchers, they dribble pretty bad.  

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Your rounded rim is not so much a problem, but the entire spout set up is. There are a few steps you can take to make it work better:

  • start the throat of the pitcher about a third of the way down the form.
  • use the thumb and curved forefinger to shape the spout once the shape you have presently by pulling upwards with the thumb inside the spout and the curved forefinger outside, use lots of water and pull so that the spout rises and things slightly. .  not so thin as to become weak, just enough to shape and thin the rim. Lastly on the spout use a damp finger on the inside of the spout rubbing back and forth to slightly widen the spout where at the rim.
  • Last step is to use the finger around the untouched rim to move it slightly lower than the area of the spout, this I usually do on the wheel with the wheel speed slow, first finger inside hooked over the top .

 

Hope my description is helpful, 

best,

Pres

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Just needs to have a sharp  edge. Often easiest to do after bisque as the clay can be block sanded to create a very uniform sharp transition  at the front edge.  Less surface attachment better chance for gravity to rip it away cleanly.

Interesting point, next time you are at a shopping center look up at the ceiling of most canopies (Stucco type). It’s common to place a V groove a few inches in from the edge so as the water rolls around the canopy edge to the canopy ceiling it has to go back uphill into the V groove. This gives gravity time to do its work. Worst case, pitchers could sport the same groove just under the trailing edge of the spout but in the end some liquid would roll down the pitcher. It would only be a fail safe against extended pouring dribbles. 

Basically anything you do to make this pouring angle more acute and sharp gives gravity an advantage for a clean separation.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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3 hours ago, neilestrick said:

You need a sharp edge on the spout. When you make the spout, first pull it up to thin it out, then shape it.

Blue-Pitcher.jpg

Forward cant of this spout helps gravity pull this down and away for most  all pouring conditions. Nice design!

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You might find some insights to the physics of the tea-pot dribbling phenomena by reading the recently published article (and all of the articles cited therein):

I'm a little teapot — 
Dribble no more: Physics can help combat that pesky “teapot effect”
Dutch scientists devised a model to predict flow rate when dribbling will occur.

Jennifer Ouellette - 5/17/2019, 5:45 AM
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/05/dribble-no-more-physics-can-help-combat-that-pesky-teapot-effect/ 


LT
 

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7 hours ago, Magnolia Mud Research said:


You might find some insights to the physics of the tea-pot dribbling phenomena by reading the recently published article (and all of the articles cited therein):

I'm a little teapot — 
Dribble no more: Physics can help combat that pesky “teapot effect”
Dutch scientists devised a model to predict flow rate when dribbling will occur.

Jennifer Ouellette - 5/17/2019, 5:45 AM
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/05/dribble-no-more-physics-can-help-combat-that-pesky-teapot-effect/ 


LT
 

Funny you should mention this article, I just read it recently and it prompted me to post this query.

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4 minutes ago, Johnmicheal said:

Funny you should mention this article, I just read it recently and it prompted me to post this query.

Teapots definitely more involved. Suggested viewing for some more insight and general  pleasure: smarter everyday - laminar flow.  (You tube)

free education and super high speed camera. Sometimes seeing is great for analysis.

Edited by Bill Kielb

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Try thinning that lip out, you want a sharp edge there to cut the flow so it doesn't dribble. On the next one try giving it a throat, see how on Neil's pitcher there is room for a swell of liquid on the approach to the lip. It could also be wider at the throat on the next one. You could make a practice pitcher, make the same shape cylinder then instead of putting a handle on it pull 4 spouts going around the edge then see which design pours the best.

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The 'sharp edge' needs to be at the edge where the liquid separates from the spout.  The photographs show the edge to be rounded.  The shape and thickness otherwise appears to be OK.  

Bill mentioned in an earlier post that he "files" the lip at the bisque stage.  It might be useful to bisque one of the pitchers and use it as a  prototype by pouring water from the pitcher and filing the edge away, and pouring, etc. until you find the right amount of "sharpness" of the edge.   I once made a deep bowl with a big bunch of spouts around the rim, each different in sharpness and thickness.  Then after it was fired I could pour from each of them and begin to get some real data on what works and what does not work.  


LT

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11 minutes ago, Magnolia Mud Research said:


The 'sharp edge' needs to be at the edge where the liquid separates from the spout.  The photographs show the edge to be rounded.  The shape and thickness otherwise appears to be OK.  

Bill mentioned in an earlier post that he "files" the lip at the bisque stage.  It might be useful to bisque one of the pitchers and use it as a  prototype by pouring water from the pitcher and filing the edge away, and pouring, etc. until you find the right amount of "sharpness" of the edge.   I once made a deep bowl with a big bunch of spouts around the rim, each different in sharpness and thickness.  Then after it was fired I could pour from each of them and begin to get some real data on what works and what does not work.  


LT

I love the bowl idea, and I am going file them at the bisque stage, I've got four to mess with.

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Spout day this am.The sun is out and pots dry well in that warmth. Its been raining here for days

Pulled them on large and small pitchers- and 48 spoonrests -all porcelain

Handles later today

 

 

IMG_0657.jpeg

IMG_0658 2.jpeg

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1 hour ago, liambesaw said:

Can I come work and live with you? What a dream.  Everything looks so nice, wish I could learn from a master

careful what you wish for.

Leave the dog and wife for clay dreams that ends with bad back and broken body parts 

 

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9 hours ago, Johnmicheal said:

Third try, I'll see how it pours when it's done, lolIMG_20190522_122957.jpg.e6fb81c7d64d07a5f513554220590f8e.jpg

This might help as a picture is worth a thousand words. So in addition to the edge that the fluid has to pour over or trailing edge being sharp and not rounded, the tilt of the spout can help. So if we use Neil’s pitcher (thanks Neil), notice the forward lean of the spout. Kind of counterintuitive but we know gravity always pulls things straight down, so a tilting picture of a pitcher is in order.

The yellow line is the default spout angle and the red arrow is the  pull of gravity. As the pitcher is poured gravity can help pull the liquid away from the dribble zone as long as the spout has this counterintuitive tilt. Add a sharp trailing edge and voila easier job for gravity.

Now depending on the shape and size, time to experiment with a piece of string with a weight on it. Just figure the amount of tilt for typical fill level and ya got an easy visual. Also can help determine what is the best angle to block sand your bisque product based on visualized fill levels and your handy gravity indicator (weighted string)

hope that sparks some thought!

Now as to laminar flow, Reynolds numbers, etc.... for another day. Let’s just say Smooth  flow terminates much more cleanly than turbulent flow.  Smooth, gentle with reasonable velocity , basically good, rough turbulent basically bad.

3D16A9A6-E01B-43BD-9EA7-40498B2D2809.jpeg

69E1CD23-3780-4547-93B6-28BAD8AD83F2.jpeg

E502A77D-458C-4E0E-84FD-72DB65A1B4A6.jpeg

1A5DB6C2-8A50-4D36-A06F-80924E10E8D4.jpeg

Edited by Bill Kielb

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18 hours ago, Mark C. said:

careful what you wish for.

Leave the dog and wife for clay dreams that ends with bad back and broken body parts 

 

Don't forget the arthritic joints in hand, elbows and wrists!

best,

Pres

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