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Jack Woodhull

Hudson River Valley clay

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Hello all -- I am new to this forum, so apologies if this is not the right place for this post. 

I am a third grade teacher conducting research for a Hudson River curriculum. I enjoy giving my students opportunities to work with clay in an arts-related setting, but am looking to consider its natural science and social studies implications. I am particularly interested in looking for opportunities to see/feel clay in its natural state. Does anyone know of any clay exposures near/along the Hudson River I might visit for some first-hand research? 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions/input, and once again apologies if this question is misplaced. 

 

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one of our memebers, Greybird, has done extensive testing of hudson river clay.   look for her profile, then her content to see how much help she can be.

 

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You are probably more aware of the PCB's than most but I'll leave this: PCBs and the Upper Hudson River Floodplain for consideration.

I always thought a Winogradsky column would have been fun to make or study in high school or even jr. high.

I'm unsure how much elementary school kids would appreciate the complex microcosm but they are fun to watch grow none-the-less.

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Yes, thank you! I should have qualified this by saying I am not looking to put found clay into the hands of children, as I am aware of the toxicity issues, but mostly want to document through photographs and perhaps a sample to look at but not use.  

Thanks for the suggestions and the links!

 

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Yes! Go to Croton Point, park in the big parking lot facing the playground. Walk in past the playground parallel to the river. You'll be walking South. When you come to the end of the field you'll see a path/dirt road that goes up and to the left a bit. Follow that up about 100 yards and you'll see a path on your right which leads down to the river. Now just keep walking South along the river and look to your left. There are many places where trees have fallen over and you can see the clay entangled in their roots. Also where the walls of the river get steep and high you will see clay there. You'll need to check the tide chart and go at low tide. I imagine if Croton Point is not close to you you can probably find the same anywhere that you have the river walls exposed.

PS... I had the clay analyzed and it came back surprisingly clean :) 

Edited by GreyBird
Spelling, more info.

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